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GreatSchools Rating

Elizabeth Lane Elementary

Public | K-5 | 965 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 11 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted March 11, 2014

I have three kids at ELE. I was horrified when reading the other ratings by parents. Our experience has been overall great at this school. As with any public school there are things I wish could be changed, but for the most part things are run very smoothly and the children are encouraged to their fullest potential. I would recommend this school to anyone looking for scholastic opportunities within CMS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2013

Communication is a major problem at this school. From the principal to the teachers, there is a complete lack of information sharing. I've found the staff to be extremely judgmental of single parents and parents of children with any type of learning obstacle. Behind the principal's fa ade is an attitude that the parents aren't very smart, which makes problem resolution very trying. The office staff commonly behave as if you are annoying them when you ask questions or ask something of them... On the positive side, this is a challenging school academically. Great parent involvement, and wonderful kids!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2012

My family moved within Charlotte so my kids could attend ELE. We have had incredible teachers and great support from the staff. My kids are getting structure and space to be themselves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2012

The problem with CMS in general is its "culture". Teachers and adimistrators don't care about the kids. They only care about statistics and rankings because that is how they get their money from the government. They could care less about the kids emotional, social or learning needs. These kind of needs are "irrelevant" to CMS and it's what makes CMS a failure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 27, 2012

Elizabeth Lane is a wonderful school. The teachers, are very involved and care a great deal for the children and their success. Academic expectaions are very high; but, why shouldn't they be? Teaching children to work hard and expect hard work is okay.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2012

My experience: School states that my child has a learning disability or rather insinuates. Now, 2 years later and a nightmare of an experience for our child in the kindergarten and 1st grade years, something that we as a family can never retrieve. Resolution: Come to find out after an expensive documented evaluation with a private therapist, our child was CLEARED of any type of learning disability. We home school our child and use alternative online education to exceed what our child would have acquired at ELE. The mastery level is overrated and antiquated for gifted children. The program is unappealing if you want to have your child explore their challenges. So again, sadly, there is no "hoorah" moment for this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2012

Elizabeth Lane is wonderful school that strives to educate their children. The staff teaches children independent work and study skills needed for middle school. The focus in this school is on the children and what will be best to meet the needs of their education. High volunteer involvement is key to their success giving teachers more time to focus on their teaching goals. The school is filled with children of all backgrounds as is the community. Supporting the school is a high priority as we all depend on ELE to help with our children's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2012

This is a GREAT school. The teachers and staff are very involved and nice. It does have a high expectations for its students but it is all for the good of the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2012

I don't know where race issues came into this school. I went there two years ago for three years, that's not very long ago either, and it was the best elementary school I attended. Parents were very involved, and I feel like all of the teachers (most of the teachers) were very sweet and caring to all students. No student was effected because they had "the wrong skin color". Yes, I've heard the school has gone down because of the principal changes lately, the old principal when I went there was amazing. I've heard from parents of kids who still attend that many teachers have had trouble adjusting to these changes, give it time. When they have a stable principal it will get better again. I always learned things in this school, and it helped me prepare for middle school. Overall I had great teachers and the students weren't so bad. I had a few bullying problems though, but it was mostly just the girls. You have to expect in this generation some of the kids are going to be mean to others. Remember not every teacher you have is going to be amazing, and as you get older things get tougher and you can't just quit when people are mean and things get hard. You never learn that way.


Posted February 17, 2012

I have had three children attend this school and have been very happy. Each of my children were very different and I have found they were very well prepared for South Charlotte MS. LIke all schools, some teachers are better than others but found overall that the staff was great! We are not a white family and have not found that prejudice is an issue. It is an AFFLUENT school and that has it's pros and cons.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2012

Finally, a parent that has been railroaded by this school. I have said as a parent over and over that there is a massive issue going on at Elizabeth Lane Elementary and it starts with the Head Staff. I have dealt with the Mecklenburg School System as an Employee and a Parent. "ELE" is one of the worst experiences I have ever had as a parent and professional. Parents consistently complain about race issues and inequality at this school. Very sad situation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2012

Everyone is entitled to their opinion here, and I will have to agree with the other parents who feel the staff at ELE is difficult to resolve issues with, my child is not new, and the constant change in principal, teachers, etc has really changed the reputation of this school. I can't proudly say that it is a top rated elementary school because it has went down hill since we initially enrolled our child, I wish our government would pay the great teachers, supporting staff and principals what they truly deserve so we can boost moral back into our schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2012

If you don't invest money into the school, or have the right skin color this is not the place to send your child. The Staff is prejudice, they can't keep a principal, when was the last time this school received an excellance award?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2011

My child did not and has not learned a single thing at this school. I have placed ratings on this site before stating facts about the mistreatment and ill-education received at this institution, to only have them removed, this goes against my 1st amendment right as a citizen speaking about a public institution. The staff was very unprofessional and inappropriate on several occasions, which ultimately involved me withdrawing my child and handling issues on different level all together. I have a 1st Amendment right and plan to voice my concerns thoroughly about the poor education tactics rendered at "ELE."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2011

The person that said the school is difficult to deal with and parents are an inconvenience must be new to the school. ELE has always been an open door school and welcomes parent involvement to the fullest. We have a new principal and this is the 1st year that there have been some changes. We, as parents, who have been here, do notice the changes and are doing everything we can to get back to the "happy" ELE. Although change is good in some cases. You should never try to fix what isn't broke!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2010

As stated in many of the previous ratings this is a challenging elementary school. Lets not forget that the parents who send their children to this school must reinforce the schools teachings for the school to be such a success academically . Kudos to the community for outstanding parent involvement in their children academics. The staff at this school is very difficult to deal with when you have questions or want to volunteer. Unfortunately, it is a struggle to get answers and parent s are an inconvenience to the office when questions are asked. The schools green efforts are so extreme that communication with parents is difficult because the school does not consider all involved. Not everyone can go green or green is not always feasible to get your message across and so their messages are lost in cyberspace. I see so many frustrated parents because of the lack of communication and skill that should come from the suppose to be trained staff at this school. Having high scores on grade level material is fabulous but we must also be teaching our children respect for the community and its members.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 30, 2009

My mother, a veteran elementary educator of 25 years, said 'you can't beat a good public school'. Elizabeth Lane is this kind of school. The school works very hard to challenge every level of student; it just so happens that most of the school is performing at above grade level. This school has an amazing PTA that is very well run and is committed to supporting the school. I have had three children attend ELE (for that past 7 years) and I have not seen anything that I would say is a true 'discipline' issue. What I like most is that this school seems like a good 'moral' fit. There are well behaved and respectful students coming from good homes where the parents value education. You really can't ask for a better situation for your children. I would HIGHLY recommend E.L.E.!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2009

I completely agree with the parent from December 2008. Although the teaching and test scores in this school is second to none, I believe that the average, healthy, silly, fun loving child is looked at as a school disadvantage if they don't consistently exceed expectations. Only meeting expectations is not acceptable at Elizabeth Lane, not even in Kindergarten, and they take themselves way too seriously. There is also a strong bias against working mothers if they cannot 150% participate in their childrens class rooms.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 4, 2008

I've had 3 children in this school. My first 2 children were in all the Talent Development programs through 5th grade and had a wonderful experience. My last child did not test as a Talent Development child. He only did average. His teachers seemed to resent the fact that he was 'pulling down the average' in their class. My quiet, average son was worked harder and singled out in the class when he did not perform above grade level. He started hating the way his teachers made him feel so much that we had to pull him out of the school entirely. The school perceived that he was a problem if he didn't make their school a high scoring test school. If your child is above average and talented I highly recommend this school. If not, STEER CLEAR.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2006

As a single Mom, I was very disappointed with the bias opinion from not only the teachers but the office staff as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

166 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

166 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
>95%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

166 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students78%
Female74%
Male81%
Black27%
Asian95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiency50%
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students76%
Female78%
Male75%
Black46%
Asian90%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students80%
Limited English proficiency50%
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students78%
Female74%
Male81%
Black60%
Asian91%
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students83%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students75%
Female71%
Male78%
Black60%
Asian82%
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities36%
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students86%
Female82%
Male90%
Black69%
Asian94%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students89%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students80%
Female84%
Male74%
Black62%
Asian82%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students87%
Female87%
Male86%
Black69%
Asian88%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students90%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 76% 52%
Asian 10% 3%
Black 7% 26%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 11%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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121 Elizabeth Lane
Matthews, NC 28105
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-5700

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