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GreatSchools Rating

Socrates Academy

Charter | K-8 | 604 students

We are best known for teaching in English and Greek.

 
 

Living in Matthews

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $191,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $810.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 9 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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27 reviews of this school


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Posted April 9, 2014

This educational environment is so unprofessional and stressful for the kids and the educators, that makes me wonder "who can stand it?". The English program is pretty good, some of the American teachers are trying, but the Greek program is totally disorganized. My husband has Italian origin and he says that it's a Greek mentality not to have any specific Curriculum. My child had a Greek teacher who cried in the classroom every day, till she eventually went back to Greece. During this specific year my student changed 5 Greek teachers. I am surprised that most of the students speak very limited Greek, even if they have been attending since ever. I don't think that the Greek teachers are real educators or they can offer any high-level knowledge. Other parents say that the school used to be better in the past, the administrators were always very unprofessional though. If I had the chance to take my child from there and enroll it to another charter school, I'd do it now. It's my husband who hesitates. No differentiation, especially in Greek. It is a hard language to learn anyway, but the lack of using alternative methods like projects or theater or games is a big downfall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 25, 2013

Socrates focuses on high achievement through trackable individual progress year over year. Students are in Greek immersion for language and matematics 2 periods a day. The small class size & dedicated teaching staff makes Socrates second to none. Socrates has very little turn over as a charter school because of the tight-knit community. The best way Socrates could improve would be to take their concept from kindergarten to graduation by adding a high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 25, 2013

We were attracted to Socrates Academy because it is a semi Greek immersion school, focusing on reading, writing, and mathematics taught through the use of the Socratic Method. Small class sizes, uniforms, and no tuition were an added bonus in our eyes. I still remember the day our son got in through the lottery. I was shaking with excitement and told my husband, "We can never say we don't have good luck!". It has been a few years since that day in February, two children there, and we are all happy as ever. This school is more than just a place to "house" children during the day. It is a community, an extended family. With all families committing to volunteer a minimum of 36 hours a year towards the needs of the school. I am remind of the lyrics from the TV show "Cheers"', when thinking of Socrates. Sometimes you do want to go where everybody knows your name. More importantly, the faculty all know my children, and not for the wrong reasons. Being an Honor School of Excellence proves that in the few, short years the school has been in existence, that the methodology behind this unique program works. My children are flourishing, not just in English learning, but in Greek too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2013

We love SA. It worked well for both our kids one in second grade And one in seventh grade. The youngest is gifted And the eldest is special needs . SA has catered very well To the needs of both kids academically and intellectually. They do have great teachers who are able to provide Differentiated learning to all kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 11, 2013

My experience with Socrates Academy has been wonderful so far. I have a rising second grader and both years my son has had awesome teachers who care about him and want to help him learn as much as he can. Everyone I have dealt with from the school has been great and I think this is a wonderful environment for my son. There is a sense of community when you enter into the school. Every day there are plenty of parent volunteers helping with all kinds of activities to make this a wonderful environment. I look forward to the fall when both of my children will attend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 3, 2013

Great school! High academic standards, strong sense of community and a caring staff. We feel very fortunate that our children have the opportunity to attend such an exceptional school. Couldn't be happier!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 3, 2013

Socrates Academy is just what we were looking for. They offer a challenging curriculum in a nurturing environment. My daughter came to Socrates Academy after 2 years at our local CMS elementary school, which (like SA) is an Honor School of Excellence. Even so, the difference is night and day. My daughter is happy and excited to go to school every day. Her classmates have been friendly and welcoming; she has never felt like the odd one out despite being new to the school. Her teachers are very caring and the differentiated learning provided in the classroom has been wonderful. When we enrolled her last June, the administration put me in touch with one of the school's Greek language teachers who tutored my daughter all summer. This teacher was incredible. When my daughter started in the fall, her new Greek language teacher and Greek math teacher could not believe she'd had no prior exposure to the language before that summer. We're delighted she has the opportunity to learn in a rich, multi-cultural environment and hope the prospective high school will be a reality by the time our all children are old enough. We love this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 2, 2013

We have decided to leave this school because the administration would not enforce the anti-bullying policy. The children who have been with the school from the beginning get preference over the ones who have come in at the beginning of Middle School. They have not addressed (at all) the multiple bullying issues we have faced. I am going to the county Superintendent over these things. We had to pull our daughter out of school on the last week of 8th grade because of bullying...and her teachers supported this. Her locker was vandalized all year (they do not allow locks on them) and a wonderful teacher provided a space in her closet for my child to store her things. I copied the Board of Directors on the emails I directed at the teachers and administration, but never heard from any of them. This school may be a "school of Excellence" in academics, but beware. It was more harmful to our Middle School daughter than helpful. I cannot recommend it to anyone now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 2, 2013

I don't know what is going on here, but I am very upset with the quality of teaching at this school. My child had challenges this year with his literacy teacher. I kept inquiring and working with him as he just wasn't getting it, but the teacher seemed unable to help him. Finally I learn at the end of the year that not only is this her first year of teaching, she is not yet qualified to be a teacher as she just STARTED going to grad school for her masters at the beginning of the year. She has an undergrad degree in something totally non-related and never taught before, yet they let her start teaching literacy, of all things, which is critical. Who lets someone with these (lack of) qualifications be your "literacy teacher?!!" I don't think this was fair to the students, and it certainly was not how the Administration represented this teacher at the beginning of the year. The word is that she is a friend of the Administration and several board members like her so that is apparently how she got the job. I am very upset as I feel my son basically lost a year of quality instruction, and I can't help but wonder who else they let teach here due to friendships without qualifications.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 2, 2013

This school once was a decent elementary school, but prematurely expanded into a middle school and things have declined. There are bullying problems with middle school, the Greek program is a total joke, and the board that runs the place seems more fixated on hiring family and friends than properly running this place. Once they hired well qualified teachers. Now the Greek program is a mix of qualified Greek teachers and former Greek preschool teachers who are not at all qualified to teach elementary Greek. You never know what your child will get from year to year, but they certainly aren't making the progress they should from a two hour so-called immersion program. You'll be more immersed if you hit the local Greek diner once a week than at this school. There's no supervision whatsoever of what the teachers teach in each class, so you may get a good teacher or a totally worthless one. None of the governing groups at this school get along - the board, the Administration, and their version of a PTA bicker and fight like preschoolers so nothing substantial gets done. If you have other options, run, don't walk because this place is going downhill fast
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2011

Socrates Academy is a great school. The teachers, staff and Board of Directors truly care about our children and work very hard to make the right decisions. The academics are challenging but there is so much more than that. Our children are learning at an exceptional level in a comfortable, friendly, and safe environment. Every new year brings more opportunities and options for the children. There is also great support from most of the parents who put in hours of volunteer time to support and better the school. I feel very fortunate that my child attends Socrates and know she is getting the best education possible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2011

Overall, the school is good. The challenge is the "Greek Boys Club" that is known as the board. The issues of nepatism (Sp) and hiring of daughters, nephews, cousins, etc.. is a bit disgusting and discouraging when it comes to trying to get things accomplished. The principal is not empowered to control things and it seems that the success of the school up to this point is largely due to her dilligence and hard work.... The board has rolled the parent faculty involvement (similar to PTA) up under THEIR control and therefore it is only an arm to facilitate their wishes and desires. If they can get past the issues,then maybe they won't get in their own way of becoming a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2010

I have been a student at Socrates for 5 out of 6 years. It is a great school and I learn so much. One of the best qualities that the school has is that it measures the different levels the students have so that they learn at their own pace. It is also a school that puts family first.everyone at this school is my family.If anyone asked me what what school would be best for their children, I'd say Socrates Academy.


Posted October 17, 2010

I love this school. It is such an intimate caring school with great teachers. My child is treated like she is special and not just a number. The academics are challenging and stimulating and geared to each students level. They offer many enrichment activities which make it convenient for parents. I highly recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

We're just starting our second year with Socrates Academy and my wife and I have been very happy. Our son has been fully engaged in the curriculum; math, reading, writing, and yes even the Greek language. I've found some parents rate schools based on convenience or lack of frustration, but what really matters is passion. The teachers and staff (including the founders) all share a vision and demonstrate passion for building a educational culture that fosters and develops the children. Being a new school, there are growing pains and challenges, but communication amongst the parents, teachers and staff is open and constant. I'm looking forward to my youngest son starting kindergarten next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

I have two children at Socrates Academy. My older son is an "Original Scholar". What started in a temporary location with only Kindergarten and first grade now Socrates has become a K-8 school with the distinction of being an Honor School of Excellence for the second year in a row. The school has really grown over the years. There is a new gymnatorium, an AIG program, band, chorus, Spanish and Chinese in addition to Greek. My children love the school. Not only are they thriving eduacationally but socially as well. We love that even the teachers that have not taught our children know who they are. It makes them feel safe and happy. A new middle school building is in the works. We are very excited to see this next stage of growth at Socrates. My husband and I are grateful everyday for finding out about this wonderful school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

My son George started Kindergarten at Socrates Academy this year. It's a great school with a small teacher/student ratio. It is an academically rich and nurturing school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2008

As parents of two children at Socrates, we can't say enough great things about the school. Our daughter is in the 2nd grade and is adjusting well for her first year there. She came from a private school and was behind when she started Socrates. Her teacher tutors her on her own personal time free of charge. That would not have happened at the private school she attended. I also love the fact that they can attend extra activities such as Spanish and Drama for a very reasonable cost. Our only regret is that our oldest child is in the 5th grade and missed out on the opportunity. We simply love the teachers and staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2008

Socrates Academy is a Charter School with Grades K-4. It is a Greek Emmersion school, meaning that 1hr and 40 min a day is in Greek. We consider this a wonderful challenge and a great way to keep our children engaged. This year there are finally great efforts to teach a higher level of curricullum in core classes. Although there is still no Gifted Program, Acclerated Readers, Odyssey Of The Minds, AIG or any program in place for those children who are in need of a more challenging curricullum. We do in fact have 3 teachers for those children with learning difficulties. There is a lot of focus in place for those with learning challenges and no program in place for those with higher abilities. This seems to be very unequal approach to education. Communication about our children's daily lesson plan is extremely modest.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2008

This will be our third year here,and WOW has this school grown in so many ways!We LOVE the teachers and our children love the school and are very excited to get back to it!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students90%
Female85%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students94%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students71%
Female70%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Academically gifted95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female65%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students67%
Female68%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female57%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students58%
Female54%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically gifted85%

Science

All Students73%
Female64%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students77%
Female84%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students77%
Female82%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students76%
Female81%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students89%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students73%
Female74%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged83%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students77%
Female77%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students83%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students64%
Female64%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students81%
Female82%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 52%
Asian 6% 3%
Black 5% 26%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Greek and Chinese
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • NC Honor School of Excellence (2009)
  • NC Honor School of Excellence (2008)
  • NC School of Distinction (2007)

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Clubs
  • Student newspaper

Language learning

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Foreign languages
Foreign languages taught
  • Greek and Chinese
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Greek and Chinese
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Gym

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • Ms Kristen Priganc
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
Special schedule
  • Extended/longer school day
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (704) 321-1714

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Core knowledge
  • Gifted / high performing
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Foreign languages
Foreign languages taught
  • Greek and Chinese
  • Spanish

Resources

Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Greek and Chinese
  • Spanish
School facilities
  • Computer
  • Gym
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Student newspaper
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
More from this school
  • The Academy's multilingual/multicultural curriculum follows the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and the National Greek Curruculum Standards. Particular emphasis is placed on developing proficiency in mathematics, reading and writing, both in English and Greek through the use of the Socrates Method.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3909 Weddington Road
Matthews, NC 28105
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 321-1711

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