Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Preeminent Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 591 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 

Living in Raleigh

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $121,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $810.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Sweep tile
No Purchase Necessary. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes begins at 12:00:00 AM Pacific Time (PT) on April 1, 2014 and ends at 11:59:59 on April 30, 2014 (the “Promotion Period”). Open to legal residents of the U.S. and D.C., 13 years and older. Each school that receives a new, published review will get one (1) entry into the sweepstakes, up to ten (10) entries throughout the Promotion Period. See the Official Rules for details. Sponsor: GreatSchools, 1999 Harrison St., Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612.

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

17 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted March 26, 2014

I am the husband of someone who works as a substitute teacher at Preeminent. My wife experiences there are nothing to brag about. The discipline at this school is horrible or shall I say nonexistent. When the students do something inappropriate such as use profanity towards the teacher, there are no disciplinary actions. The child may be sent to the office but then they will just bring them right back! There will be no suspension or anything and the students know this. This is pertaining particularly to the middle school grades. I'm not talking about an isolated incident, this is a common thing st this school. I'm not blaming the students for there behavior, but I blame the administration and the parents who are not holding them accountable. The administration of the school doesn't seem to really care what the children do. There are many disrespectful behaviors committed by these students that would ordinarily call for expulsion at any other school, but I guess they need the money. Before my wife got a position there, we were actually considering sending our child there. I'm so glad we didn't. I wish more parents would learn more and speak out about this school.


Posted February 6, 2014

My grandson attended this school last year (2012-2013). His family had such high hopes for this school and his academic career there. As and educator, I was familiar with the Heritage Schools. I advised my daughter to remove him from this school and not consider returning him there under any circumstances. He attended 1st grade here, entereing as a model student (behavior, academics, etc) from a private school with a higher score than PreEminent. His teacher at PreEminent immediately determined he was a behavior problem and he spent most of the year trying to please her and stay on the color indicating good behavior. When asked about academics she could not deny his performance, but seemed to look for something wrong. I personally believe she had some personal dislike for him or something about him. This year he attends an elementary school in Garner. He is again a model student, making good grades, gets along with his teacher and classmates and is haveing a great year. The problem, PreEminent. Many of these reviews are old. Don't put your child in this school. If the Heritage Schools were actually monitoring what goes on here they would not allow an association.


Posted December 16, 2013

My daughter attends Kindergarten at this school. I must say I was a little hesitant about enrolling her at first because of the low review and test scores. But I was so impressed when she started, her teacher recognized in the 1st week that my child needed more of a challenge and placed her in an advanced kindergarten class. Her current teacher is excellent with challenging my daughter and always communicating about the lessons being taught each week. I find the parents of the K-1 hall to be very evolved with volunteering and donating items to the classes. My only concern would be the drop of process. At times it can be a little unorganized especially considering you only have from 7:45am- 8am to drop your child off. There needs to be a better system in place as after 8am there is no one outside to direct traffic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 14, 2013

My grandson attends this school and I find it to be an excellent school. The teachers are engaged and they keep the students interested and he is scoring well above his grade level. I highlt recommend the school.


Posted February 16, 2012

I have 2 children in this school 2nd and 3rd Grades. Both Teachers are excellent! I have no complaints. Both of my daughters have excelled as a first year student leaving a local public school. I feel they are cared about and I trust the staff. The Principal has proven to be OK with me. The office Staff is where the real value stands. Ms Shaw goes above and beyond and is the most Professional Member in the building. Ms Melody is worth her weight in GOLD! I would definitely refer anyone who is an active parent in their children's lives. As for the 6th Grader Review, I believe that the parenting begins at home. We must raise strong children and address issues with respect and responsibility. Otherwise, based on your approach people may seem UnProfessional and and Unresponsive to your Needs. Get a Grip.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 16, 2012

I have a son in kindergarten and a son in the first grade and they really love going to school. They are learning things far beyond what they were learning before we moved to North Carolina. I am pleased at the way they keep the children focused on their learning by sending homework packets home week. I also like how the principle has a face, not just someone who sits in his office and dictates but he gets involved with the students and the parents and that was definitely a plus for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2011

I have a 6th grader that attends, my experience with the authority there is unprofessional, you can express how you feel about something there as a parent that you don't like, instead of it getting handled the principal hold grudges and shows that he dislikes you in every way, and have attitude with you from that moment on, thinking that you have insulted them. So Unprofessional. This is what I see not some days but every time I pick my child up. To me if you don't want the kids to bully each other, Someone needs to lead a better example, because they only do what they see from those who teach them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2010

This school is a school with no real culture. This school is a bad mistake for me as a parent. The teachers do not know how to control a classroom setting.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 26, 2010

I have 2 kids at Preeminent. One is in 2nd and one is in K. Its been an experience to watch my kids mature academically this first year and I am impressed with the progress thus far. I will keep them there and see how this next year goes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2010

This is the worst school ever would not recommend it to an enemy. This has been the worst experience for my children & as a parent, I regret placing them there. I have two children that attend and have had to have them switched to different teachers. Both teachers seem to be overwhelmed by stress and do no know how to control their classrooms,children can do what they want. The Assistant Principle is very helpful and understanding and there are people there who mean well, but overall I am not pleased with the general enviornemnt and regret placing my children there. My children are advanced and the work the children recieve in class and for homework is simple, not challenging and there is very little effort made to accomodate children that know are ahead.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 30, 2008

I have 2 children at this school and Ms. Smith and Ms. W are amazing teachers. They do one on one time with the students and they make sure that each child understands and excells individually as well as with the class as a whole. This is my daughters second year here and she is above her grade level. This school is a great school. Although I would love for them to get more after school activities that the kids could be involved in, and a cafeteria. Otherwise this is a great school. If you want stress free schooling try Pre-Eminent!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 12, 2008

You better get on board with Preeminent. It's like a free private school. You don't have to worry about buying clothes beacue they wear uniforms. They have a new great principal who's turning things around. Soon you will not be able to get in this school, so if you want your child to be part of something great thats happening, call up Preeminent. By the way, my son is going to the 5th grade .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2008

I am a parent of a current (2007-08 school year) PreEminent student. While this year has been an adjustment for her (and me), she has excelled academically and I am very proud of her. Her teacher was able to, in a small period of time, change her from a child who was not interested in her education to one who is enthusiastic about school. While there are some issues at PreEminent, I feel that the faculty and staff are genuinely interested in the students and want them to be successful in life and in academics. As a parent I feel that if you find an area that is lacking in a school, you should become involved and see what you can do to help out...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

I have a child in the 6th grade at PreEminent and I am very concerned about what is going on. The 6th graders have had 6 new teachers since the beginning of the year. If something drastic doesn't change, the scores for this school will be even worse than last year's. This school has as much potential as any other school to excel, but maintaining good teachers and upholding high standards will have to begin to win before a change can begin.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2005

According to Spring's 2005 standardized test results this school continues to prepare students to achieve their greatest potential, as measured locally and nationally! You can expect great things from PreEminent.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 13, 2004

I am a parent of a student at Pre-Eminent. I have watched my son excell academically and gain self confidence as well as fantastic study skills. This school is incredible, has nurturing teachers and keeps children on the road to success. This school goes from K-7 this year and next year will go from K-8. I look forward to 3 more years with my son as a student here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2003

This school has been great for my three children. They are all on the A/B honor roll and they are above average in their academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
48%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
44%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
28%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
45%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-5%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
65%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students22%
Female28%
Male13%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English22%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students16%
Female26%
Male-5%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students17%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English17%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students16%
Female21%
Male12%
Black16%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged25%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students18%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English17%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students18%
Female27%
Male9%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students20%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English18%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant18%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students40%
Female54%
Male28%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students25%
Female33%
Male17%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students21%
Female17%
Male24%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students24%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students11%
Female13%
Male8%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged8%
Not economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students12%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English10%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant11%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students24%
Female32%
Male16%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students27%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students8%
Female-5%
Male10%
Black7%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged-5%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students9%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English8%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students29%
Female27%
Male31%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students-5%
Female-5%
Male-5%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged-5%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students-5%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-5%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-5%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students19%
Female29%
Male8%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English19%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students39%
Female50%
Male27%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 89% 26%
Hispanic 8% 14%
Asian 1% 3%
Two or more races 1% 4%
White 1% 52%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 65%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Melanie Butler-Williams
Fax number
  • (919) 235-0514

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3815 Rock Quarry Road
Raleigh, NC 27610
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 235-0511

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools




Bugg Elementary
Raleigh, NC




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT