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GreatSchools Rating

Casa Esperanza Montessori

Charter | PK-8 | 380 students

We foster enthusiasm for learning, independence and cultural awareness.

 
 

Living in Raleigh

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $155,200. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $970.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 12 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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37 reviews of this school


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Posted June 3, 2010

The school is a wonderful place for your child to learn. While some parents cannot be as active in the school, there are many parents assisting and the sense of family really shines through.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2010

As the parent of a first grader, there are regular writing assignments with a good focus on sentence structure. The children are encouraged to write in cursive, a Montessori practice, but are allowed to write in print for their personal work if they desire. There are daily cursive writing practices. the class size is just right. As a Montessori school, all classes have a lead teacher and a para professional - most of them are degreed teachers who may not have taught in a while or are changing professions. The classes are well-run environments for children to thrive. The administration is very responsive to reasonable requests.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2010

While teachers are caring and genuinely care about the students, I feel they are set up to fail, at least in the lower grades. Class size is a real concern. 28 students in my daughter's Kindergarten, 27 in 1st grade. I don't understand how basic reading and writing can be taught to this many students (there is one uncertified TA per class). The teacher called my daughter a 'model student', but I fear her good behavior caused her to be overlooked. I pulled her from Casa mid-1st grade. She was not progressing in reading and there was no applied writing practice (such as a journal)-- plus they learn to write in cursive only. The Head of School (principal) has an aloof, 'too good to be bothered' attitude which might work for high school but is hardly engaging for elementary. I do not recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

I love the Montessori learning style coupled with a greater emphasis on Spanish than you see in most other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

I love that CASA has a dual language program, and an emphasis on montessori education along with NCSCOS. My children have blossomed in this environment and at their own level. I also love the emphasis they place on healthy eating at school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

We have a wonderful Montessori school and active PFA. Despite receiving far less funding than other state supported schools, our test scores are strong and our programs are thriving. We are the first school in the Southeast to acquire a Touch Tank.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Where to start. The caring , dedicated, focused and highly qualified staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Casa is not just a school, is an amazing family-oriented diverse school with a wonderful dual-language montessori education for our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2009

I am a student at Casa Esperanza Montessori Charter School ,aka Casa or CEMCS! So I know more than the parents! Casa has been the best school I've ever had! Once you get in you don't want to get out of the school. They also have the best education. Right now I am doing AMAZING grades in spelling, math, and social studies! Casa's favorite word would probably be Hope. Every month the school gets together and sing songs. Our wonderful principal and teachers always remind us about friendship and respect. So if you are looking for a wonderful school for your child Casa is the school!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 12, 2007

My children have been attending Casa for a few years, and although there has been some teacher turnover, we have been pleased with the education that our children are receiving. The teachers are wonderful. Each teacher that my child has had has impressed me with their dedication and creativity. The school has incorporated worksheets but this is to ensure that there are no holes in the curriculum. They are working to ensure that our children will be well-prepared to move on and succeed in any other environment. We feel very lucky to be enrolled at Casa and my children love going to school there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2007

As for most schools i leave a star for improvement. teachers and always smiling and friendly. i enjoy then class envirment over public non montessori schools. alot less negative disipline. A+
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2007

Ended up taking my daughter out of the school mid way through her first year at Casa. The communication with the parents is very minimal. We only get a brief summary once a month about class activities and her weekly folder always had very few work items in it. Tried to be an active parent and participate in all school functions. Teacher was not receptive at all with communicating to the parents of the class - we (the parents of the class) ended up depending on each other to try to find out what was going on at the school. Even parent/teacher conferences gave very little clue to my child's learning or progress. Met with the principal who seemed receptive at the time but never followed up. 29 Students enrolled in the class by December four already left Casa to go to another local school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2007

My two children have been attending Casa Esperanza Montessori going on four years.They have an awesome,experienced group of teachers that makes the quality of the academic programs excellent!The only downside to the school is that there is no music/art program.The children still have plenty of opportunity to participate in their regular class with art projects and singing music.The school has a small community feel,like you're with a big family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2007

My two children use to go to Casa. I was unhappy with the lack of structure and holding the children accountable for their learning. Your child needs to be a self starter and push themselves to learn. There is not a good discipline plan in effect.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2007

We are on our 4th year at Casa and think it is Raleigh's best kept secret. There is a unique culture and philosophy you see in the students and teachers at Casa--one of respect, peace, acceptance and a love of learning. Children can work at their own pace, in groups or independently, and are free to move around the room, as opposed to being lectured to all day. A 1st grader can be exposed to 3rd grade work because of multi-aged classrooms. I am glad that Casa does not follow the 'traditional' Montessori curriculum. My children will probably be in public school in the future so I want them to be comfortable with End of Grade Tests and worksheets and not be dependent on Montessori materials to learn. With uniforms, it is about one's character, not one's clothes that matters, there's a reasonable amount of homework, and the Spanish is phenomenal!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 3, 2006

Because this is a charter school (public) it doesn not follow an authentic Montessori philosophy of education for children in first grade and above. There are a lot of workbook type activities going on with more focus on traditional curriculum rather than montessori curriculum. With the rapid growth of the school there has also been more shuffling of teachers and classrooms then is desirable in a montessori school. While the children's house teachers are well educated and experienced, not all upper level teachers are certified or have many years of montessori teaching experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2006

My child is in her 2nd year at Casa Esperanza & we have been overwhelmed with the kindness of the students, the invidualized education they are able to offer. They have made extra efforts to cover the simple, basic skills in math, reading, & writing while allowing each student to pursue more complicated, Montessori works at their level. The parent involvement is phenomenal. I've also substituted in a few classes & have been impressed by the work ethic of the students. The teachers are very qualified, capable, caring & many are bi-lingual. What a great resource in our area!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students69%
Female65%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female71%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students76%
Female83%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students83%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female70%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students66%
Female57%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female64%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students69%
Female71%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students85%
Female91%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female68%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students29%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students55%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students90%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students91%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students90%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 49% 52%
Hispanic 24% 14%
Black 17% 26%
Two or more races 7% 4%
Asian 3% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • School of Distinction (2012)

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Graphics
Clubs
  • Sewing/knitting club

Language learning

Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered
  • Spanish
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • School psychologist
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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School basics

School start time
  • 8:05 am
School end time
  • 2:50 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 7:30 a.m.
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Diana Bush
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Age at which early childhood or Pre-K program begins
  • 3 years old
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (919) 855-9813

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Dual Language
  • Montessori
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Global
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • Spanish
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Cycling
  • Soccer

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Graphics

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Chess club
  • Music Classes
  • Sewing/knitting club
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Monitor the playground
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
More from this school
  • The “Casa Way” is a Montessori focused philosophy emphasizing grace, courtesy, and respect for self and others. Our students are encouraged to develop a world view. Montessori students are self directed, creative, independent learners who become problem solvers, relate well to others, and grow into responsible world citizens.
School leaders can update this information here.

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2600 Sumner Blvd 13
Raleigh, NC 27616
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 855-9811

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