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Morrisville Boro Middle School/High School

Public | 6-12

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2 stars


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15 reviews of this school


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Posted September 18, 2010

As a former student, I have to say this is by far the WORST school I ever attended. No offense, but the Morrisville Boro School District is an absolute joke; as well as a disgrace. Mediocre teachings, classes, and the school itself is in sorry shape. I only attended MHS for 6th grade before transferring to Pennsbury. MHS was a nightmare to me, I hope to NEVER relive. As I recall, in this school, I only had 1-3 decent teachers. Almost every bathroom was locked, so it's a wonder someone didn't have an accident or get a bladder infection. Students weren't interested in learning, teachers weren't interested in getting them engaged. I would never make my children attend this pitiful school. Morrisville needs to seriously wake up and improve their overall standing, education included!


Posted April 29, 2010

My children attend and I think it is an excellent school. Maybe these fund can help them move forward.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2010

I rate this school thus far as a 10, my son is a six grader at this school and I see the progression in him day after day. This school and the teachers are amazing at what they do. I just wish they had a better sports system.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2009

They worry about the buildings when the teaching is poor. The kids don't care to learn, the teachers don't care to teach. They think a new building will make it all better. Well, wrong. The State needs to come and clean house and get things right.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2008

As a current student of Morrisville High School, what I can say about it is that it has an amazing amount of teachers willing to put forth their full effort to teach students. However, despite the fact that while they put forth effort, the students do NOT succeed and fail constantly. Henceforth, they give the school a bad rep. To be blunt, the school has very few students that care about education. It's like any other high school, only with even more idiots to contend with. While you have amazing teachers, you have unimaginable morons. So I would suggest if you want a good school for education, you do not attend Morrisville High School. It would be a good place to learn if there were not so many distractions. I.E fighting, chaos, unruly students, sabotage, and idiocy and its finest. No, the staff is fine. Students? No.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 30, 2008

I am a former student of MHS, and what stood out to me most about the school was how caring and friendly most of teachers were. Everyone knows everyone, and in some senses that can be kindof homely. In another light, the fact that there isn't as many students causes a lot of social uproar. There's little to no security in the school, even after all it's been through. The staff is excellent, and if the students would make more of an effort towards class instead of drama, this school could exceed the expectations of most. Unfortunately, unless some changes are made, I can't see this happening. The school is very concerned about the emotional state of its students, which is great, but sometimes so much so to where things are expanded into bigger problems than they were. Excellent English programs. Terrible Science programs. I enjoyed my stay there.


Posted April 23, 2006

The academic programs range from wonderful-the english department-to lack luster-the math and science departments. The electives are wonderful and well developed. For some children the small amount of children in the school may be good. For those children trying to go into a specific field, the small school may be harder for them. The small amount of children in mhs has led to a small number of classes and many teachers who are seen as jokes. The small school also makes choosing friends harder as the selection is not large. The cliques are few and divided, and race and class are the main factors when it comes to deciding between social groups.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 7, 2006

Morrisville is a small school that is close-knit. The teachers truly care about the students and the community. Small class sizes allow lots of individual time for students, but funding is often a problem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2005

Morrisville is a small town. Unfortunately, our schools are not in a good place academically. The teachers are great, but the curriculum holds back our children's education. Our state test scores are below average in reading and math on all levels. Parent involvement is horrible. The same ones do everything over and over again, year after year. Parents who are involved with their children will succeed, otherwise, they don't stand a chance.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2005

The academic programs are not challenging enough to boost up the SAT scores. Extracurricular activities are unknown to me. Minimal parent involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 1, 2004

In my opinion Morrisville high school is one of the best schools out there. A lot of people underestimate this school but anyone who attended or actually attends this school know that it is a wonderful environment and its basically like home to the kids who attend the school so before anyone decides to judge this school i would truly appreciate it if they would get all the facts before they do judge.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 23, 2004

I am a former graduate of MHS. From reading the other comments here I can see that nothing has changed since I left in 1989. I live in the Borough and gladly pay for my children to attend other schools. After what I often went through at MHS it is hard for me to believe it has gotten worse. But obviously it has. Security was always a joke, teachers knew little more than some of the students they taught. I would never recommend any child being place in MHS. Why don't we do the smart thing and merge with Pennsbury? Or at least let the state of PA take over and straighten out the mess?
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 2, 2004

At the Back-to-School nights, my son's teachers gave me email addresses and the parents were told that we could email at any time if there was a problem. Not only have I emailed one of my son's teachers this year, but last year as well, and never received a response. Don't provide email addresses if you do not intend to write or even call us back. My son is in the 11th grade and even though he struggled with Honors US Cultures and I suggested to him that perhaps he take a Social Studies that wasn't as advanced, he did not want to change. After two years of below average grades, he finally changed. I feel that his teacher should have noticed this as well. Last year, there was an altercation after school and the vice-principal called our home and said someone told him that my son was one of the kids involved. After he was cleared of any involvement, the vice-principal never called to apologize for something that caused my husband and myself to be extremely worried. There also seems to be no interest in helping the parents with college planning, college fairs for the students, etc. Even though I have seen worse schools and my son wants to graduate with his class next year, I am glad my younger son is enrolled in private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2003

This school is not the best it could be. Morrisville ignores some of its larger problems in favor of smaller insignificant problems. But out of all the schools in the area I felt safest going to this school. The community is small so everyone is like family. Most of the teachers at this school were like friends to me. There is nothing greater than having a teacher who pushes you to do better everyday but can joke about each of your mistakes with you. Morrisville may not have the means to start a tutoring program but each teacher is willing to find the time to stay after school with you and help you out. I am glad my mother decided to stay in Morrisville when she moved her so many years ago. I would never have met so many wonderful people or recieved such a great education.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 16, 2003

My child has not had a particularly good experience at this school. The principal of the middle/high school seems to think he is too important to deal with parents. I had to go through the superintendent to get the principal to see me. The vice principal is rude and vindictive. Most of my child's teachers seem to think they are there to put the children down, too many negative comments are made to them. I also question the fact that their children do not attend this school. Not enough attention is given to correct English usage, grammar and punctuation. If your child does have a problem in a subject, be prepared to pay a tutor, there are none available through the school. Also, be prepared to be inconvenienced throughout the school year. The safety aspect of this school is questionable. Twice this year we have had children bring guns to school. There are no checkpoints, no metal detectors, no real security. Oh, they do require you to buzz in, but they can't see you, so they just buzz anyone in. I can't stand this school district, that's why we are moving.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

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69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2012.

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65%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

2012

 
 
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76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 76% in 2012.

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2009

 
 
71%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a

2009

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

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2009

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 60% in 2012.

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39%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 73% in 2012.

2012

 
 
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2009

 
 
54%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a

2009

 
 
41%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2012.

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56%
Science

The state average for Science was 42% in 2012.

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24%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 83% in 2012.

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2009

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
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Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Oops! We currently do not have any student information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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550 W Palmer at Cox
Morrisville, PA 19067
Phone: (215) 736-2681

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