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GreatSchools Rating

Infinity Cs

Charter | K-8

 
 

Living in Penbrook

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $60,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $700.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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31 reviews of this school


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Posted August 22, 2014

I am new to this school and I am worring a little about this.My son was enrolled not by the lottery but by the waiting list.I am happy but at the same time nervous.He went to Christian Academy Private school for his kindergarten year and I was not satisfied-teacherhis ,Ms.Martin, didnt teach him anything extra even though he went there with the 1st grade knowledge-reading,counting,general knoledge in history,geography,they learnt how to write in script though through the school year which is really cool, but it was not enough for my son.He was bored all the time getting misbehavior notes,which was very upsetting for me.That is why I decided to try a new school-Ithis time Infinity.I hope it would be a wonderful year for my son there, and I will definitely keep you posted further.Good luck for every parent out there looking for a better school.Hopefully our efforts will pay off in future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2014

As a student who currently attends ICS, I will give you the facts and only the facts. Only send your kid here if you are looking for the education, not the art and music program. My 6th grade teacher was okay, but I've had better at Paxtonia Elementary School, the school I attended grades K-5. My 7th grade teacher is, by far, the best teacher ever! She is the role model everyone could look up to. But, Infinity tells parents one lie, "We don't give homework." I get homework, trust me. Not as much as my brother who attends CDMS, but still a fair amount. The art and music program is pretty bad though. Art class is boring and will positively give no beneficial information to your child. In music class, the music teacher gives you no instruction at all. She has the middle school singing songs that Kindergarten students should be singing. PE is okay, although many students don't think the teacher is good. German class is one of my favorite classes. The teacher is amazing. But, the paraprofessionals are mean and annoying. One always shushes you, even when you explain that you are consulting with a classmate for help. Danke f r das Lesen! (I think I spelled that right.)


Posted September 20, 2012

My child recently started HS after attending Infinity since it's inception. Infinity did a fantastic job of preparing my child for life long learning. Students at Infinity are required to present reports and presentations to their class from Kindergarten on up. They receive positive and constructive feedback on their work. Giving a 3 minute speech about "yourself" in HS was a no brainer for my Infinity grad, not so for kids of other schools. My child's typing skills, note taking skills, attitude towards school, teachers and learning are far above those of their HS classmates. The supurb, enriched, learning environment at Infinity is certainly missed by my child. I will be forever thankful to NJH and the Infinity Charter School staff for the amazing work they have done and continue to do with my children. As for art and music, take a look at Infinity's yearbooks. See the amazing artwork produced under Mrs. A's direction. See how many students participated in Dauphin County Chorus and Dauphin County Orchestra every year, thanks to Mrs. W. Incredible opportunities await your GIFTED child at Infinity Charter School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2012

Pardon abbrev's, but lot to pack in 1,200 chars. Many w/bad reviews just don't get it - CD would kill to have Infinity (INF) die, so a certain amount of protective behav by staff/admin is expected - have had to fight hard to exist. Kids that say they are always in trouble-wonder why?? INF has great discipline which pub school sorely lacks (anything goes). So if your kids like to cut up/misbehave, keep em in public where they will thrive! My daughter just finished 3rd, and worked her way from 3rd to 7th gr spelling in 1 yr-so much for no individualization! She had German in 3rd-not until high school in CD! For those who think that parents don't get a say-try public! Don't even get a parent-teacher conference in pub middle schl, and many at CD don't return e-mails/ph calls. My middle schl son heard so much positive from sis-now he is going to INF just for 7th & 8th. Yes, music, art, athl are weak-but because the school is so small-they do best they can. INF is for gifted, but cant discriminate-shy, mediocre, disruptive kids wont like it. Real vacations on INF calendar-way better than CD pub. New princp this yr will only make better. INF IS A GREAT SCHOOL-NEED MORE LIKE IT!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2011

I say this with all due respect (which is little) but this school is one of the worst I've ever heard of. I went there from its inception and graduated to go onto SciTech last year in 2010. The music and art programs are not only bad but insulting, the curriculum consists of not doing any real music or art but just doodling mediocre paintings and singing songs for 3rd graders (which is great until you graduated 3rd grade). The teachers of music and art rely more on keeping control of the students by putting them down (and sometimes insulting) then they do actually teaching. I won't lie this school is great but only if the teacher's like you, otherwise you're out of luck. I would not recommend this school for any child that actually has opinions and can differentiate from right and wrong conduct of a teacher. The only thing that stopped me from rating this a 1 is the fact that the 7th/8th grade homeroom teacher. She is supportive and will actually teach a gifted curriculum if you're an above average student (unlike most other teachers). Considering I only have like 120 characters left I will let my rating explain how good of a teacher she is, keep in mind she brought the rating up 3


Posted August 1, 2010

I currently attend this school and I love it! i've been at the school since it first opend and will be devastated when I have to leave in two years. I find the teachers to be very helpful, paitient and friendly. I have never had a teacher that I was never able to click with. I feel that the ciriculum is perfect. It's just the right mix of challenge and fun. I love the way the clases are combined and the way this school operates. I love how they have themes, and that every subject is centered around that theme. I could never pick a favorite theme. I would say the only downfall of this school is the building. It's a little run down, but I know that they are trying to build a new place. In all, it's an amazing school and I would highly reccomend sending your kids here.


Posted June 5, 2010

My family is continually grateful for the opportunities that this school has afforded us. The individualized learning has suited my three children well, as they are able to excel and advance in areas that they are strong, while still assuring that areas that need work are not ignored or pushed under the rug. While no school can meet all students needs all the time, this has been a great fit for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2009

I'm amazed at the disparity in these reviews; parents seem either to love or hate Infinity. My family has been here two years now and for us it has been a great fit. My kids were identified as gifted in their public school, and needed a richer and more challenging curriculum. Other parents I know with similar situations also love the school and find it to be a good fit for their children. I could be wrong, but I wonder if some of the negative reviews come from parents for whom the school was just not a good fit for their children. If your child does not love learning, has difficulty behaving and paying attention in class, and needs lots of drill/repetition and homework, Infinity is not for you. Alternatively, if your child has a thirst for knowledge, learns quickly, and is fairly well-behaved and respectful, you will love Infinity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2009

I was part of the first graduating class at Infinity, and I have to say that I look back at my years there with no regrets. . The curriculum offered unlimited possibilities, as I was introduced to the concepts of silicon based life forms and bioengineering in seventh grade. Infinity covered the basic material that you would learn during a year at public schools in a matter of weeks, and then challenged me to expand my thinking with delightfully challenging course material. As a public school student that STILL struggles to find adequate challenge even in college, I highly recommend Infinity to the parents of gifted students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 1, 2009

My child attended Infinity for 4th & 5th grade and is now back in public school for 6th grade. Up through & including 3rd grade she tested in the advanced range and upon leaving Infinity after 5th grade tested with a combination of basic and proficient. She was extremely bored with Infinity. My child is very shy and due to the despotic atmosphere strongly pushed at Infinity my child withdrew even more and became very anxious about going to school. Having two school aged children and trying both Infinity and public school, we realize the grass is not always greener and public schools have a lot to offer. To each his own of course but for our family we would not recommend Infinity for academics, learning social skills, nor for learning responsibility, independence, nor self confidence all of which are vital aspects of a well rounded education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2009

Disappointing is the word I would use to describe Infinity Charter School. I say this both as the parent of an Infinity student and as an educator who has taught gifted children. The school simply does not deliver the gifted curriculum that it advertises. Yes, it does have some of the elements of a gifted program such as ability grouping, but the academics are far from advanced. Contrary to what is advertised, instruction is NOT individualized and students are routinely shortchanged when it comes to resources. Plus the school s atmosphere is so repressive that the kids are not allowed to express their individuality or creativity. Not exactly the kind of setting that you would want, especially for a gifted child. A year at Infinity is enough. My gifted child will not be returning next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2009

Our children are new to Infinity Charter School this year, but will definitely be returning next year. Both now come home from school excited and anxious to share what they have learned at school. The most exciting details brought home from their previous school was 'we had fun at lunch and recess.' We feel that the individualized curriculum is wonderful and allows our children to easily challenge themselves to the 'next level' in learning. Previously, our children's teacher's did not have time to assist with accelerated learning. This was left to a gifted teacher to provide during a pull-out program twice a week. I must agree with something a parent posted yesterday; 'at this time, we could not imagine returning to a school where mediocracy and teaching to the middle are best practices..' . No one school is going to be perfect for everyone. You must be open to new ideas.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2009

My children have just thrived at Infinity. I feel that the idividualized curriculum has benefited both of my children. For the first time my children are allowed to go at their pace and are excited about school. My youngest is bright but struggles with processing issues and the staff and administration has bent over backwards to help him utilize and teach him skills that will help him. They both come home and eagerly share what they have learned at school (that NEVER happened before). I have seen a lack of respect to the children by some of the ancillary staff but I have brought it to the administrations attention and it has been dealt with. No school is perfect but for us, at this time I could not imagine returning to a school where mediocracy and teaching to the middle are best practices. We will definitely be returning next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2009

While we mostly agree with the post of May 4, the unfortunate aspect to Infinity is the lack of respect given to the children & parents alike. Sadly, the children seem to be treated as though they are in a detention type setting and the parents are asked to voice their opinion(s) but unless you have something positive to say...they really do not want to hear it. I feel this 'suppressive' type atmosphere is not conducive to healthy learning nor a healthy child. We have chosen not to trade in our childrens' self esteem for this alternative approach to learning...our children will not be returning. In addition, although they teach according to gifted practices, not all of the students are 'gifted' and this has also been a downfall for us. Our children, who were tested as gifted, have a hard time relating/understanding many of the students logic and behaviors.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2009

I would not recommend this school to the parents of any child, let alone a gifted child. My child attended Infinity for 2 years. The school did not even have a curriculum, let alone a gifted curriculum. The science and social studies programs were weak, and the music, art, foreign language & PE programs were very poor. The state academic standards were routinely ignored. The Director/CEO cared more about keeping her iron grip on the running of the school than she did about the students. I suspect that this school is being used to develop an Infinity Charter School franchise that will financially benefit the current operators of the school. Too bad students have to pay the price.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2008

Infinity has been an extremely good school for our two kids, who have hard-to-meet needs. Our son has dyslexia and has been given a customized program that has made a huge difference for him. Our daughter has graduated at this point and is doing extremely well in all Honors classes in high school. I understand the concerns from other middle school parents about transitioning to high school after not getting a lot of homework at Infinity, but this really didn't turn out to be a problem for our daughter. Kids get used to homework; the more important thing, I think, is that they be prepared academically, and Infinity certainly did a great job there. She found she was way ahead of her classmates from other schools, so kudos to Infinity on teaching a strong curriculum!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2008

This school is a Godsend for gifted children. This is my son's second year in this school and I am very pleased with his progress.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2008

After three years at Infinity...my child now in middle school...I must pass this on. My honest opinion...the worst aspect of Infinity's middle school is the lack realistic preparation to study & work that traditional school brings. Virtually no books come home to study from & do homework, a rude awakening when in 9th grade. One book came home in 6th & none after! New middle school teacher may help the other superior one change this problem. They don't supply enough textbooks for each child & are never 'allowed' to bring textbooks home...why? Almost no field trips due to lack of funds...why? Our tax dollars...children seem to be shortchanged...we need to address the issue of WHERE that per student cost allowance going? Outside audit & parent reviews & former students might provide honest evaluation to school board. More honest than 'crony reviews' I have read. Infinity not recommended for 8th graders!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 3, 2008

Our family loves Infinity. We have found that the teachers are concerned about the students and work to ignite the kids interest in the subject they are learning. The curriculum is challenging and allows each child to move at their own pace. The environment is caring and respectful among the children as well as between the teachers and students. I love the mixed age classes and smaller class size. The only drawback is the older facility which hopefully be remedied in the next few years and a high teacher turn-over. We have only left the school because we moved out of state. I am looking for a new school as much like Infinity as I can find.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2008

ehhh, infinity really isn't the best. it's my first year there and i already am wishing i would've stayed at my old school. Even though most of the teachers are nice, the 7/8 teacher makes us get in trouble for everything and the principal is way too overprotective. I don't really necessarily reccomend this school much.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

20 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 74% in 2012.

20 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
92%

2009

 
 
100%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2012.

17 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2012.

17 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a

2009

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2012.

17 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a

2009

 
 
100%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

12 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 65% in 2012.

12 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
86%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 64% in 2012.

12 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
90%

2009

 
 
86%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

12 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
93%

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2012.

12 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

11 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 76% in 2012.

11 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2012.

11 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

11 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 60% in 2012.

11 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 73% in 2012.

11 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female100%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female100%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students91%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 71%
Black 13% 15%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 3%
Hispanic 6% 9%
Two or more races 6% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 47%N/A49%
Male 53%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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51 Banks St
Penbrook, PA 17103
Website: Click here
Phone: (717) 238-1880

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