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GreatSchools Rating

Masterman Julia R Secondary School

Public | 5-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 12 ratings
2012:
Based on 9 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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71 reviews of this school


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Posted July 26, 2012

Masterman is great and all, but a lot of students cheat. That's how some of them get into the high school. The teachers at Masterman were, 3/5 of the time, awful. I didn't get accepted anywhere for high school and I blame Masterman a teensy bit. There is nothing for middle schoolers to do, unless you like track, yearbook, band, or choir. And the fact that Masterman is so academically far ahead, I'm talking high school material for 7th and 8th grade and some college stuff for high school. Even if you happen to fall behind, like I did, you're still on a 10th grade level by the time you graduate middle school. If you didn't get into Masterman for high school, you're at the biggest disadvantage. Your mates are progressing and then you have to take middle school all over again. Masterman should definitely be bigger, as to accept the population of 8th graders as a whole for high school. Still love Masterman, though.


Posted April 8, 2012

We came from a highly academic prestigious Quaker school. My son is eceptionally happy and intellectually stimulated at Masterman, and much prefers his current school to his previous one. There is no substitute for the real life lessons to be found in a truly diverse community of bright kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2012

Masterman definitely needs a new building;however, the district does not have financial means to do this. However, my daughter interview @ Penn Charter one of the most selective Private school in Philadelphia Area, guess what they were not far academically compare to Masterman Students. The teacher really teach the subject so not having science book may be a problem for student who teacher does not teach. Phillip Exeter one of the premier top academic program Private education does not use a text book for math, guess what the student still learn. I absolutely hate elitist; stop bashing Masterman. Masterman sends public school children to some of the best university and a lot of private school kids come to Masterman in the 5th and they absolutely love thrive academically at this school. World Class facilitate, no ? World Class students and teachers, yes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 18, 2011

Corrected review ....After extensive research my husband and I chose to submit an application to Masterman Middle School for our 5th grader. Coming from a private school we were a bit overwhelmed by the class sizes - 33 students per class, the deteriorating condition of the school building and the lack of resources and extracurricular activities offered to the students. Coming from a regular public school and being accepted at Masterman would be a great accomplishment but coming from a blue ribbon private school , I am not impressed. I believe the school is doing the best it can within it's financial constraints but the school is not the best fit for my son . I was quite surprised the students are not provided science textbooks nor does the school have a science lab. I was not impressed with the rooftop play area , I was not impressed with the cafeteria but what has impressed me is the dedication of the staff. The school staff truly cares about the students, so much so many teachers volunteer their time for extracurricular activities and tutoring. Although the school wasn't a good fit for my son, it really provides a good education for an above average self motivated
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2011

I came to this school expecting it to be good. The teachers vary from absolutely amazing to awful. There are more awful teachers than good teachers. It makes me wonder how they got to teach at this school in the first place. I am in 8th grade and have been here since 5th grade. I got into the high school, but I'm not going. Traumatizing experience over-all


Posted March 28, 2011

Hey so, i go here at masterman and i've been here since 5th grade. It's honestly a great school and i love it here, and i love my friends but sometimes it gets a little over whelming. 5th grade was a big adjustment from my other school to masterman, 6th grade was smooth sailing, 7th grade was honestly the worst for me. They put so much pressure on you saying that it's what matters for high school, and even though it is, i lost so much sleep from it. 8th grade is the best year of all and i feel like i've got everything together. Grades, Boyfriend, Friends, but the thing is, i didn't get accepted. I cried because i feel like it's my second home. I'm going to Saul, and I'm excited for that, but i really wish i was able to get in. Time to start a new chapter ... and so it begins ...


Posted February 23, 2011

I love this school for is wonderful reputation and I am pleased to have a son there in 7th grade whose first report card was all A's and one B!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2010

I'm in 6th grade at Masterman, and it's a good school, but it lives on its reputation. All year, especially in fifth and seventh grades, there is constant reminder of the PSSAs, that part is terrible. The fifth grade teachers are definetely not superior to any others, but there are some wonderful teachers in the other grades. I have learned a lot. Also, I am being challenged a lot more than if I had been back at my old school. Oh, and the homework is not all what it is worked up to be. We don't get a humongous amount, though there are a few nights a year when you are working from the minute you get home to bedtime. We have many extracurricular activities, and a wonderful arts program (the play each year). I do agree on the point of the lunchroom. It is not completely repulsive, as I have read, but it is not better in any way than any other school cafeteria, no matter what you hear about a cold/hot line. All in all, if you excell in anything acedemic, you would fit right in here at J.R. Masterman Labratory and Demonstration School.......whatever that means. -one happy camper at masterman


Posted October 10, 2010

National Blue Ribbon School and President Obama gives his Back to School address from this school. Highest SAT scores in Pennsylvania.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2010

I am an 8th grade student at Masterman School. I'll be honest to you. There is indeed alot of homework we receive each day, including projects and other things. But I feel at home in Masterman. I know everyne and everyone knows me. You have your variety of students and teachers so you'll never be bored, basically. You have that math teacher from last year who believes math is groovy (and it is). Then you have your science teacher who gives the best experiments. You have students in the hall waving hellos to you, and you have teachers from 5th, 6th, and 7th grade who ask you if you plan to stay in Masterman for high school. I just received my application for high school, and with no doubt, Masterman will be my first choice. I've developed a family in Masterman, and I guarantee you will too. :)


Posted May 27, 2010

My child is an 8th grade student at Masterman. Next year she joins the elite 100 as a 9th grader. Masterman is a school that virtually runs itself academically because of the students. The majority of the students are gifted and thanks to their own initiative or that of their parents they will always do well. My child has been fortunate because every year she has had at least one superior teacher. The teachers in the middle school do not appear to be as invested as the high school teachers but those that were invested were excellent. We are looking forward to our next four years at Masterman. The administration is very approachable and easy to work with. The building itself due to its age could use some updating. The School District needs to pay better attention to the needs of their gifted students too much emphasis lately on empowerment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2010

I simply love this school because it is the best!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 28, 2010

My daughter attended Masterman from 5th-12th grades. She graduated in 2007. She is a very bright 'MG' child who was challenged to the point that she actually had to work! I loved it. She learned how to organize herself and make better use of her time. She got into a good college and is doing well. She also made some amazingly incredible diverse friends, one she is rooming with in college. However, you must be your child's advocate, if you don't and they are quiet like my daughter, they will get lost or ignored by the teachers and administration. They do have some amazing teachers here, and at the same time because of the teacher's union they have some duds. I was sorry to Mrs. Bravo retire as Principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2010

While there are a surprising number of middle school students with discipline problems, students on average are good and their parents care about their education. Sadly, Masterman teachers take this for granted. They don't try to make learning fun or engaging. They don't much teach. Instead, students are subjected to a grinding schedule of homework and, in school, ill-planned unsupervised group work, which means Masterman students are mainly self-educated, in combination with the many hours parents must spend assisting them with homework and particularly massive, pointless, relentless 'projects' that invariably demonstrate teachers who have given very little thought to the pedagogical objectives of such time-wasters. This school has been a great disappointment. The only thing it has to offer is a reputation, and I suspect it's going to be losing that in the coming years, given how weak the teaching is (with a very few exceptions).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2010

Floored that the best school in Philadelphia has such a repulsive cafeteria. Shocked that the teacher in a wheelchair is given a substandard basement classroom. Ugly library. Dirty building. Why doesn't the administration take care of these issues, so easily remedied? Poor kids! They knock their brains out in grades five to eight , and then have to reapply for high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2010

I am in 6th grade and has been at Masterman since 5th grade! I absolutely love it! There are so many different cultures and opportunities! They teach about roman myths/history in Latin, they have music and gym also! Everyone has heard about the famous heavy load of homework we receive! Well it is true! There are a lot of projects, worksheets, and textbooks! Although, the teachers and staff are wonderful and well educated! They try their best to help you! There are a bunch of trips! My 2nd yr has been the best so far! It is very different from my old school, even though they're both public schools! Anyway, this school is awesome! I would really recommend this school to any child who would like more opportunities and better education!
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 24, 2010

My son is in the 8th grade, he simply loves his experience at Masterman, he is very comfortable with all aspects of academic life a Masterman except for one that often is a source of great frustration to him. For those that for watever reason did not move to Algebra II and were asked to repeat Algebra I, he felt that after being challenged in 7th grade by a wonderful math teacher and getting an A, repeating the same conceptual framework, regardless of the teacher skill and enthusiasm, severely bruised his self steem, disrupted his friends support base and mainly left a big hole in what was a sequence of continuouly challenging math sequence. My humble suggestion is that if assessment suggest that they are not ready to engage the demands of Algebra II, to at least explore some more advanced topics and / or applications
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2010

I am in 7th grade at Masterman, I started in 5th. While I love some teachers and classes, there are a few teachers who can't teach well, and/or act completely innapropriately. As for social stuff, I love that my friends are white, african-american, asian, hispanic, and anything else they may be. To me, and most everyone at Masterman, we are just people. We're friends. We're all one big family. As for the infamous workload? Please don't take this lightly. The amount of work we get is insane. Accept that your child may indeed get a B or occasional C on a test because there is no time to study because WE'RE TOO BUSY LEARNING ALGEBRA IN THE 7TH GRADE. Yeah, it's tough. But knowing that A's and B's at Masterman can take you to nearly any high school you want to go to, helps me keep my head high...and my grades.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 10, 2009

This is my son't first year at Masterman. He is in the 5th grade. I was very worried about the transition from a small prodimately African-American School to a larger setting. His adjustment was smooth. We both love that he has an opportunity to mix and mingle with all different types of cultures. Academically Masterman runs a tight ship. My son is being more challenged academically for the first time in his life he has to study. :) I love it! He has made the adjustment, we are still working on the organizational part but he has gotten better. He loves the new friends he has made and he loves the fact that being MG doesn't draw alot of attention because it's the norm at Masterman. I feel the school is safe. The building is a little old and can use some modifying. Its been a great experience so far.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2009

I so agree with the statement made on the Sept. 7, 2009 posting. I child's states that he has spent the last 3 yrs. at Masterman teaching himself, for the teachers I stopped. So I agree that a lot of the students are doing well because they are determined to learn. This is something that should be looked into. I have tried but I have not gotten anywhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

164 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 65% in 2012.

163 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
96%

2009

 
 
94%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 64% in 2012.

164 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
95%

2009

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

197 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2012.

197 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
95%

2009

 
 
97%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

196 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 76% in 2012.

196 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
99%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2012.

196 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

196 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
99%

2009

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 60% in 2012.

196 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%

2009

 
 
98%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 73% in 2012.

196 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
96%

2009

 
 
98%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2012.

104 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%

2009

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2012.

104 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%

2009

 
 
99%
Science

The state average for Science was 42% in 2012.

104 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
91%

2009

 
 
97%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 83% in 2012.

104 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%

2009

 
 
99%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students99%
Female99%
Male100%
Black100%
Asian100%
Hispanic93%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students97%
Female99%
Male96%
Black95%
Asian97%
Hispanic86%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students87%
Female95%
Male81%
Black89%
Asian86%
Hispanic79%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White90%
Economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students99%
Female98%
Male99%
Black97%
Asian98%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students97%
Female98%
Male95%
Black92%
Asian98%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female99%
Male100%
Black98%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female99%
Male100%
Black98%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female99%
Male98%
Black96%
Asian97%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnic100%
White100%
Economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black100%
Asian97%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnic100%
White99%
Economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students96%
Female97%
Male95%
Black90%
Asian97%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnic100%
White97%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students94%
Female96%
Male92%
Black92%
Asian95%
Hispanic100%
Multi-ethnic93%
White94%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black100%
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black100%
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female88%
Male91%
Black83%
Asian95%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 42% 71%
Black 26% 15%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 22% 3%
Hispanic 6% 9%
Two or more races 4% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
College counselor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff French
Italian
Chinese (Mandarin)
Spanish
American Sign Language
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • U. S. News and World Report Top 100 Public High Schools (2008)
  • Newsweek Top 100 Schools (2007)

Special education / special needs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Special education

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Industrial shop

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • American Sign Language
  • American sign language
  • French
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • American Sign Language
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • Italian
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School start time
  • 8:15 am
School end time
  • 3:19 pm
School Leader's name
  • Marjorie G. Neff
Fax number
  • (215) 299-3425

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Special education
Foreign languages taught
  • American Sign Language
  • American sign language
  • French
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • College counselor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • American Sign Language
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • Italian
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • Passes/tokens for public transportation
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Industrial shop
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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1699 Spring Garden St
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Website: Click here
Phone: (215) 299-4661

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