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GreatSchools Rating

Highland Park Elementary School

Public | PK-5 | 672 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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33 reviews of this school


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Posted January 2, 2014

Both of my kids have attended Highland Park since kindergarten and we have been EXCEEDINGLY pleased with the quality of education, amazing, caring teachers and the social atmosphere. We love, love, love this school. Our children have made great, solid friends, had a lot of fun and are very happy. Our middle school admissions officer told us that children from Highland Park are among the best prepared for middle school. I rarely write a review online, but am disappointed to see so many negative reviews and felt the need to provide my own candid input. No school is perfect, but HP is probably about at close as you could ask for, public or private. Because of the parent involvement, the school offers many benefits of a private school without the cost of tuition. I think this school should be STRONGLY considered by all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2013

Awesome school with great teachers. Separation of kids based on ability level works very well and my kids love it. As far as PTA - yes, PTA raises money and spends that money to improve this school - more money they raise, more activities/fieldtrips/supplemental material/teachers/etc. can be provided to the kids. Improvement suggestion - Wish the school would offered a more comprehensive language program introducing kids to Far East languages as well as Latin.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2012

If you read many of these reviews about Highland Park, you really pick up on the bitterness around the PTA and Fundraising. The PTA does raise a lot of money. Money which pays for positions that AISD won't fund. We currently pay for Technology teacher, Spanish teacher and a part time Reading specialist. We've help fund the Writing Without Tears program, the Math Attuned program and Fluency Centers. Plus we give money to grades to support them and enrichment fees for children who can't afford them. All which every kid in the school has access to. I don't agree that the PTA is cliquish. We BEG for help on a regular basis. Do we try to do too much? Maybe! As far as the academics go, I do agree with some of the other reviews. I have had a child in the high group, the medium and now a 504 kid. If you have a child with any kind of learning disability, this is the place to go! The high kids get great support too. In my experience, the middle kids can get missed. There are some some fantastic teachers and some that should leave. I have found that to be true at most schools. Even private. Overall, it really is a great public school! Just finished my 14th year at HP and still appreciate it
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2012

We've been extremely happy with the education our student is receiving at HP. Academics are very strong at HP--students average top 98% in standardized tests. Teachers assign projects beginning in K and students must learn to budget their time from an early age. Students also receive homework beginning in 1st but quantity does not seem over the top. The principal's blog provides details about each grade during the year. There may be a bit too much emphasis on raising money, at times all the events feel like a shake down, but we are thankful our school has the resources to support its teachers. We might consider pairing with another school, perhaps one that is minority-majority, on a community project to expose our kids to populations rich in other ways.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2012

While I agree with some of the reviews about the cliquish feeling within the PTA (I felt that way, too), I have found as I have gotten to know people over the past 7 years at the school that the people in the PTA now are more inclusive than they seem. My advice would be to for volunteers to approach the PTA president if there is a committee or an event. It seems they are always trying to fill positions. The PTA does do a bunch of fundraising, but it also buys educational materials for the kids, supports the library and specials classes, supports the teachers, etc. I feel like that PTA support is what makes our kids breathe a little easier when standardized tests come around. The teachers don't have to teach to the test because they have other materials to use to teach the foundation kids need. As for academics, I have mixed feelings. It seems that the kids who are placed in the middle classes are not challenged enough. My child in the highest classes was challenged more. For the most part, I feel the kids get a good education. They do some great, really fun projects.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2011

I love all the teachers that I have worked with as a parent. I don't like the entitlement of those who pay moeny for private parking spots and then are rude to other parents - in front of the children. Doesn't teach the children good values - and the PTA doesn't seem to mind as long as it brings in money. They sell parking spots, they sell passes so children can cut in line to games during Hoot. I don't understand how this reinforces any good values whatsoever. My parents attended Hoot and were mortified. Reviews are based on the lack of leadership of the principal and the PTA to practice what they preach.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2011

This school is over-rated. It may have been great once, but that was some time ago. The principal has no idea what is happening in the classroom and seems out of touch. The "grouping by ability" is a joke as my son has experienced it first hand. He's never been challenged in 3 years and is bored in class most of the time. Teaching quality in my experience has been poor - I've seen lots of preference issues which other reviewers have already mentioned. They are correct. There is way too much emphasis on parent funding of special events. The school should be focused on the learning aspect. I am now looking at private schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2010

Teaches entitlement while saying they promote "scottie" values. Raising money is key even if it means allow "rock star" kids whose parents have paid a lot of money to cut in line at the annual HOOT carnival. Kinder kids waited patiently in line while our future Wall Street jerks cut in line and played games over and over. Parents pay $20,000 a year for parking places. They don't practice what they preach. The teachers are great but values are important too and they are being lost by the actions of the PTA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2010

Lots of school spirit, plenty of money for extra programs. Education seems pretty good. Lots of emphasis on testing. Lots of emphasis on money and privilege. Too much fundraising -3 major events that the PTA strives to raise $50,000-$70,000 EACH event ask parents for $50-1500 sponsorship donations. They do help out students who can t afford things like $50 for trip to Sea World on a chartered bus for 1st graders (that's just one of the field trips).. Promotes entimtlement and they don t see it.. Worst example is raffle to be a Rock Start at the Halloween Carnival winner and 5 friends arrive in a limo and get to cut in line all night at the events and booths. Good character building for future real world execs and politicians I guess.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

Great teachers, great students, great staff!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2009

I concur w/ the parent who says 'They monopolize the high-profile PTA jobs, while many parents put in time but are not recognized.' Not just PTA but homeroom parent positions too. Every yr, it's the same clique revolving the spots. The last two principals have been asleep at the wheel. They have done nothing but collect their paychecks. And if you think your children's getting a good education, think again. My child got straight a's, and a gt student, throughout his 6yrs at HP. When he got into middle school, he failed math and science for 2 straight yrs. We had to pay handsomely to the Sylvan learning ctr to teach him what was not taught at HP. if I were to do it again, I should have enrolled him in Kirby Hall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 20, 2008

Highland Park has benefitted from the energetic leadership of a new principal 2 years ago. One of the most challenging aspects of educating students at Highland Park is the matching the expectations of the parents at the school. My own children have benefitted from exceptional teachers. Inconsistencies across grade levels are being addressed with alignment initiatives, but progress does take time. Parents are quite involved yet the school is certainly not driven by parents as the previous reviewer suggests. Every staff member has extensive professional experience in education, including parents who have been hired to serve as staff. I have 2 HP graduates and one current student and am extremely satisfied with the quality of education at HP!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2008

There's ability testing, and it's inconsistantly messured from grade to grade. There are children who are moved up to 'higher' classes based on their parents' involvement and popularity in the school, rather on their assesment scores. So the whole idea of seperating the children on skill level is a joke. Some parents have the attitudes that they own the school. They monopolize the high-profile PTA jobs, while many parents put in time but are not recognized. If you've done enough time on the PTA in the high-profile jobs long enough, you'll be hired on as a regular paid employee at our school! There's a lot of chronism based advancement, where the teachers and some parents are much too familiar, which leads to favoritism amongst certain students. The teachers are spoiled with gifts/money , but give nothing in return. We've had really great and poor teachers. 5th grade was terrible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2008

I was first attracted to this school because it supporting Levin's 'A Mind at a Time' which focuses on each individual child's differences, working on their strengths and not only putting the focus on their weakness. I was disappointed. My child not only lacked a challange in the area she was advanced in, but ended up in the lowests classes in the placement overall, with extra attention to her weakness in special ed, with teacher, Read, who was a waste of a year. Not only did my child not improve on her weak areas but she lost a lot of ground where she had been strong. I would not recommend this school. The principal is very nice but is not familiar enough with what's going on with the teachers in their classrooms. She should be more acquinted in this area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 18, 2007

Academics are terrific and most of the teachers are great but the principal exhibits weak leadership especially in cases involving teacher discipline and safety.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2006

My younger son just completed his elementary years at HP and I cannot imagine a better place for him. My older son also attended, and both were well prepared for middle school, even ahead in curriculum knowledge. The staff is friendly and truly enjoy working with kids. The atmosphere is positive and very safe. This is a school where almost all parents are involved and expect their children to learn and behave. Therefore, high academic standards are met. With a combined 12 years at this school, I only was displeased with one teacher. Some might think the school is too structured or make the students work too hard, but they really come out with an excellent knowledge base. I love the activities such as Halloween Hoot and the beautiful landscaping provided by parent involvement. You will love this school. Probabaly the best in Austin (private or public).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2006

Highland park has a great academic program. The students that attend are getting an excellent education. The major concern about the school is a lack of racial/cultural diversity. Also, there is a major emphasis on fundraising at this school, which can be disturbing at times. While it is great for parents to support the school and help it to have additional resources, it would be nice to see them give some to other schools in the district without resources so that the disparity is not so great. Other than that, it's a great school. The teachers are wonderful, and very easy to work with and very accomodating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2006

This is a wonderful school I love everything about it and the staff they are all great
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2006

Highland Park has been good for my kids,it is like a prep school, with a lot of parents involved fundraising and running the school. Homework was not too harrowing, but I think parents are inclined to help too much. Some of the projects are amazing work for this age group and kids should really own the work. Nice teachers who care. Support your art, music, and phys. ed. teachers and programs!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2006

Our child attended Highland Park for two years before we transferred. Although she is a very high tester and compliant - thus ideally suited for HP in theory - she and we have been much happier since we transferred. Highly structured (rigid?) environment, our teachers were indifferent in quality (perhaps we were unlucky), neither administration, teachers or PTA seemed inclined to hear anything about possible improvements. I think more flexibility about innovations with regard to best practices are preferable. Very weak leadership. Difficult environment for working mothers (PTA meetings at lunch time, many class events during the school day etc). We discovered that Austin has a cluster of excellent elementary schools in the central/west zone but their paths to excellence are quite different. We wish we had looked into this more closely before k.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

103 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 87% in 2011.

103 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 85% in 2011.

104 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 88% in 2011.

102 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
99%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 90% in 2011.

100 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 82% in 2011.

92 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 81% in 2011.

92 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 87% in 2011.

92 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education83%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students97%
Female94%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant97%
Gifted/talented100%

Writing

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education80%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%

Science

All Students97%
Female94%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant97%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 79% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 72% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
92%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 77% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%
Math

The state average for Math was 75% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 73% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students96%
Female97%
Male96%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant96%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted95%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students96%
Female95%
Male96%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Special education80%
Not special education96%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant96%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic94%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education100%
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted98%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students95%
Female95%
Male94%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian80%
Hispanic94%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a

Writing

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted98%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Science

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Exemplary".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 77% 29%
Hispanic 14% 52%
Two or more races 5% 2%
Asian or Pacific Islander 3% 4%
Black 1% 13%
American Indian/Alaska Native N/A 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 2%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 2%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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4900 Fairview Drive
Austin, TX 78731
Phone: (512) 414-2090

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