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GreatSchools Rating

Olympic Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 216 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted June 14, 2014

my child will start 6th grade this fall and I am very concern about the things I hear about the school. I have nephews and nieces that went to this same school and they all said if given the opportunity this would not be their first choice - but because of our address my daughter has to attend this school - my first impression was not so good when I attended open house a week ago -- while the principal was making a speech the teachers on the side lines were chatting away. I find that very disrespectful - the kids will see this behavior and do the same. I have my doubts about this school, test scores are horrible. the more I think about it, the more I would like my child to be transferred to a better school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2014

Kids never do work, teachers do not do anything bathroom is really bad and unhygenic. Posts a threat on kids' health
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2013

I have a son with Down Syndrome that attended Olympic Middle School for 2 years. This was actually not the middle school in our district, but this was the school that actually took an interest in him as a student and educated him. I am sure Mr. Hill hated to see me coming, but he was always personally involved in my son's educational program. That is truly a rarity. The school in our district had made it virtually impossible, for us as parents, to educate our son. My son was experiencing many behavioral issues when he was first in attendance. The teachers at this school really worked with him. I loved seeing the positive attitude! Most schools love the "gifted child". I have one of those as well, my daughter. Her educational journey was much different than my son's has ever been. But the school that takes an interest in the developmentally disabled child is far more rare. My son has made tremendous strides and I believe I owe this school my gratitude. Thank you Mr. Hill! If I could give you '6" stars I would!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2013

Olympic has many great teachers and my child loves the school. My child always has great stories about her teachers and saying how she enjoys her classes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2010

My son just started school here, and I think we made the biggest mistake bringing him here. From the first day it was utter chaos. The principle nor the vice introduced themselves to my husband or I and they had no idea what to do with my son the first day. Then they had lots of kids they would scold right in front of us. The teachers have no control of these kids and I think after 2 weeks I'm looking at my options to release him from this school. Please take this as a warning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

The parents and administrators care about the kids learning and their welfare
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 7, 2009

Im a 6th grader at Olympic Middle chool and i can tell you right now that i love this school and not only does it have great teachers but also great kids
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 12, 2009

We have two daughters. One just finished her time at the school last year. She is now going to a Kent High School. I kept asking the teachers last year if she was prepared for all her honors classes in high school. As it turns out, math she had to retake Algerbra 1 & 2 and after just six weeks, she was learning something new. The only response I got when I informed to school was sorry about that the teachers were lacking. Hopefully they have improved that situation for our daughter that remains there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2008

I am an 8th grader at oly. On the cougar crew. I agree that teachers need to notice the more obvious stuff. Texting in class, the fighting in the halls. It gets hectic. All though we have after school activities, not everyone feels they can par-take in most or all the activities during and after school. Pep assemblies. We can work on those. Besides all the negative attitude, oly is a pretty okay place and invites all students to be good learners, better friends, and be able to differentiate themselves. :]
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 26, 2008

i am a student at oly. i rate this school a One. i really dont like this school, its okay. but it can be way better on activties. and be more stirct on the rules. and get ride off all the gang signs and everthing with bad stuff! im going to the 8th grade and switching to baker!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 28, 2005

My 6th grader has had a really rough time adjusting to middle school. She was an exceptional 5th grader but is finding the lack of consistency and the larger class sizes a challenge. She has been physically injured 3 times this year by other kids with the school staff not taking any action to correct the offenders until I had called to demand corrective action be taken.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

214 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
34%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

214 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

211 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
31%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

211 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
42%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

209 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

205 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
50%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

205 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
52%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

202 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students29%
Female29%
Male29%
Black27%
Asian27%
Asian/Pacific Islander12%
Hispanic28%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander0%
White41%
Low income26%
Not low income41%
Special education0%
Not special education35%
Limited English5%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female71%
Male58%
Black67%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander44%
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander14%
White80%
Low income61%
Not low income77%
Special education11%
Not special education75%
Limited English23%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students41%
Female44%
Male38%
Black13%
Asian55%
Asian/Pacific Islander53%
Hispanic32%
Native American0%
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income38%
Not low income48%
Special education7%
Not special education47%
Limited English17%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female58%
Male48%
Black38%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic43%
Native American9%
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income47%
Not low income68%
Special education11%
Not special education60%
Limited English21%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students50%
Female62%
Male36%
Black44%
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic30%
Native American9%
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income43%
Not low income65%
Special education14%
Not special education55%
Limited English32%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students25%
Female32%
Male19%
Black30%
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander46%
Hispanic16%
Native American32%
Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Low income23%
Not low income31%
Special education4%
Not special education28%
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students49%
Female55%
Male44%
Black50%
Asian70%
Asian/Pacific Islander54%
Hispanic33%
Native American47%
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low income45%
Not low income59%
Special education4%
Not special education55%
Limited English21%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students39%
Female42%
Male36%
Black30%
Asian70%
Asian/Pacific Islander54%
Hispanic17%
Native American26%
Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Low income36%
Not low income47%
Special education13%
Not special education42%
Limited English13%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
98%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students88%
Female90%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income85%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 40% 60%
Hispanic 29% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 10% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 7% 7%
Black 7% 5%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 112%N/A8%
Special education 114%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 270%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1825 K St SE
Auburn, WA 98002
Phone: (253) 931-4966

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