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GreatSchools Rating

Sammamish Senior High School

Public | 9-12 | 1079 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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7 reviews of this school


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Posted January 6, 2014

Talented and caring teachers understand the range of student needs at this school, from kids bound for top colleges all the way to those struggling to stay in school and graduate. Staff and students create a culture of acceptance that is remarkable and one that will serve students well in their adulthood. Totem pride is amazingly high, despite having sports teams that struggle and a high level of poverty. SHS is full of opportunity to challenge oneself academically as well as in extracurriculars. A full range of AP classes is available to all, including those who need financial assistance. Frankly, the Athletic/Activity Director is out of touch with community needs, but one way or another that is going to improve with parent involvement and open communication. This isn't stereotypical Bellevue, so it may not be the right fit for those uncomfortable with economic, cultural, and social diversity. The building is in the midst of a major remodel and will be a beautiful state of the art facility upon completion in 2016. Hopefully the amazing school culture will remain intact as district boundaries are re-drawn and families pursue that fancy new building.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 26, 2010

Sammamish is special with a broad diversity of students and needs. The school responds with programs such as Jumpstart and AVID to a plethora of AP classes plus College at High School and Running Start. Additionally, school spirit is very strong with the State's biggest high school fundraiser, Walk for Aidan. The principal is working tirelessly to improve the school, its teachers and its offerings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2009

Sammamish High School was rated #48 in the nation by Newsweek magazine for the 2008 school year. My daughter has flourished there and I couldn't be happier with our home neighborhood high school. By the way, all of the six high schools in Bellevue made the top 100 list in Newsweek and five of them were in the top 50.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2009

As a parent of a student at SHS, I have found this school as having brought a well-rounded and strong academic experience for our child and future Totem. As a leader in the fine arts, math, and science depts., my kids will have a step up in their future academia world of college. The teachers actually care about their students and they hold the kids accountable for their actions. Tom Duenwald, current principal, works tirelessly in his efforts to hold the standards level high for the staff and the kids. The school spirit is much higher than other Bellevue high schools. SHS represents the real world of high school life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2005

School is quite safe, nice teachers except some mean councelors, who don't pay enough attention to the student's needs. Great classes and advance curriculum. Great after school programs, from sports to art to music. And the theater department is one of the best; the new theater just opened with the best teacher ever, Ms. Mordford. School had very good students a couple of years ago but the new incomming students seem to care less and less about academics. Parents are always involved in all aspects of the school, helping out at the PTA or whenever the school organizes fundraisers to help raise money for the school. The students are all very nice, although like I said, they were nicer. But all get along very well. Very low drug and alcohol use.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 14, 2005

Sammamish has the reputation of being inferior to 3 of the other high schools in town -- but if you look at the demographics, the school holds it's own. The teachers are more caring, the schedule is more flexible, and you can take as many APs as the other schools, more than anywhere else in the state. The principal and counselors are caring, too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2005

After originally picking an Eastside private prep school, we made an active choice to enroll our high schoolers in the public schools after meeting with SHS staff 5 years ago. Given the fact that Sammamish has successfully addressed the key issues of maintaining challenging studies within real world diversity, we couldn't be more pleased.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
24%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
96%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

146 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
77%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
60%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
43%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
13%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students54%
Female65%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income48%
Not low income67%
Special educationn/a
Not special education55%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students96%
Female93%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income93%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students88%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
White92%
Low income77%
Not low income94%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students61%
Female61%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asian89%
Asian/Pacific Islander89%
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income49%
Not low income73%
Special education18%
Not special education72%
Limited English76%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students64%
Female64%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asian56%
Asian/Pacific Islander56%
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income55%
Not low income71%
Special education65%
Not special education63%
Limited English24%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students59%
Female52%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income56%
Not low income62%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited English75%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Female40%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income33%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education33%
Limited English23%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

229 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

234 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

236 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
56%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

232 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students88%
Female89%
Male87%
Black72%
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanic76%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income78%
Not low income94%
Special education74%
Not special education90%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students89%
Female90%
Male88%
Black77%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic76%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income79%
Not low income95%
Special education73%
Not special education91%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 49% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 21% 7%
Hispanic 18% 20%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Black 5% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 111%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 240%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 9N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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100 140th Ave SE
Bellevue, WA 98005
Phone: (425) 456-7600

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