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GreatSchools Rating

Hockinson High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted September 24, 2013

I am a senior at this High school, and I have seen a lot of change throughout the past four years, and I can certainly say that it has improved a lot. There is an emphasis on standards-based grading, which is different than other schools around, but this makes the grading more comprehensive, letting teaches and parents know where a student struggles. The academics are rigorous, and will challenge any student, though homework is a definite part of the student life.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 22, 2011

I think hockinson is a great school but the things everyone else talked do exist. Ya they are mostly rich kids, yes there are cliques, BUT i transferred in from another school last yr (freshmen yr) and a least one person from EVERY clique was nice and inviting to me! i have ots of friends now and im only a sophmore! another thing is that we honestly do need more class choices but the classes we do have are good classes. the honors program in english and science is a bit stupid but they seem to be improving it! overalll as long as you work hard its a nice school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 9, 2010

i dont like it its to hard for me but its a good school for how ever is really smart.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 2, 2010

While Hockinson drew a lot of attention from parents 10 years ago due to it's above average academic success and small class sizes, this has changed drastically in recent years. The class sizes have increased to nearly 30 children per class instead of the original 18-20 because of the increased home sales in the area. The teaching staff seems to be below average in my book with frequent miscommunications about assignments and what is expected of the student, as well as a substandard teaching curriculam that leaves students unprepared for WASL testing. Furthermore, the students at Hockinson come from mostly upper-class families with no understanding of the value of a dollar. Most of these kids drive nicer cars than I do and have no respect for other people. The groups in the school can be very hard to get along with and can leave a new student feeling unaccepted.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2010

Hi, I'm presently a Junior at Hockinson High School who is a full-time Running Start student. If you decide to attend HHS, you will be able to earn a great education. Sort of. Really, the curriculams for all but two classes that I have been in at HHS were horribly uniteresting. Also, when I was at HHS taking classes, I felt like my teachers wanted me to learn to maintain HHS's high status rather than for my own good. Also, the classes that you can take at HHS are so limited. Lastly, HHS is a beehive of cliques. It's a small school were there isn't much diversity of students- jocks, preps, people from only a few religions and races, rebels- and it can be really hard to make friends. I love my HHS friends, but many other people are so competitive. I am so glad that I'm a Running Start student.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 12, 2010

The school is horrible nobody is welcoming and it has tight knit cliques. Groups are based more off sport,band and religion. I have never liked it and I wished I have stayed in California. Do not waste your time here nobody is nice.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 7, 2010

My son was in the first graduating class of Hockinson High School. This school really prepared him to continue his education at the University of Washington. He left HHS and entered UW without breaking his stride. It is a wonderful school with outstanding leadership and curriculum. Their innovative teaching methods and strong instruction in writing really propelled my son to success. It is a remarkable place. Thank you HHS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 24, 2009

I'm a previous student and this was a pretty good school overall. Probably the most dramatic and gossip-hung school I've heard of, because with 700 students everyone knows everyone and their business. But still a fun school. Sports games were real fun, had a lot of participation. Academics were weaker in my freshman and sophomore year, and in my junior and senior year they strengthened with new teachers and weeding out of some of the less competent teachers. As a previous student, I must tell you: watch your kids on the weekends. If they're spending the night at a friend's house, make sure and talk to the kid's parents before you send your kid over. Because in a smaller community like Hockinson, a lot of people are sheltered and everyone looks innocent.. but partying exists here too.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 15, 2008

Excellent people and teachers. I got a great education from this district!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 18, 2006

Hockinson High school is getting students ready for a university. They only take pride and help those students who are already receiving high grades. Students who are not doing well in the high school get ignored or pushed through. The school needs to think out their priorities if they want to stay open, because I don't see to many students passing. I was doing absolutely horrible at Hockinson High school, however when I switched out to another school I am doing much better. My new school is actually getting me ready for the WASl's and I am now fully confident that I will pass. If you plan on sending your child to this school, I strongly suggest you reconsider.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 22, 2006

The high school is different from the other schools in the district. It has adopted weird teachings. Such as CPM math, where the students learn in groups taught by other students. I pay alot in property taxes, I want the teachers to teach! Teachers are not at the same level as far as character as the other Hockinson schools. Twenty years in Hockinson and very saddened about the high school. Maybe someday the district will again adopt a better standards, like they used to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2006

it is a goood school. i learned to read!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2004

In my opinion I think that this school needs a lot more choices in classes, events, and activities. Other high schools have many course choices and teacher choices for that matter. This school needs more activites and events to keep students busy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2004

I have a different point of view as a freshman at Hockinson High School. It's a school with very high expectations. The teachers are very strict and the rules are really inforced. It's not a bad school, you are just expected to know your place. I get homework in every class every night. Expect to be doing 1-2 1/2 hours of homework every night. If you follow the rules and do the homework, it's not so bad. I think will have definatly learned something by the time I graduate! I didn't want to go to high school and graduate not getting a good education. The teachers aren't very good at explaining assignments so make sure to ask questions! But if you're looking for a school that will give you a good education, Hockinson is the school for you.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 28, 2004

This school (although very good in the past) has declined in quality drastically over the past few years. Hockinson high school has introduced new 'teaching methods' that dont work and havent been proven; hockinson also uses the cpm math program with no alternative. CPM math has been proven to be inferior to more traditional math courses through standardized testing. This school seems to be all about 'new is better' and not always what has been proven historically. For these reasons, in addition to poor quality teachers i have transferred recently to CAM high school in the battle ground district.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 18, 2004

This school is extremely academic and if you would like your child to be prepared for college this is where to put them. Though Hockinson is much better than the lower standard schools such as Prairie and Battleground, Hockinson's academic programs are a little too risque. They have a program called SET where (S)cience, (E)nglish, and (T)echnology are intregrated which means you could be typing up a science experiment in tecnhology and doing a speech on technology in English. Its only downer is that you are stuck with the same students for three periods a day, though in tenth grade its only two periods a day and I'm not sure about 11th grade. Hockinson has took a very new approach to teaching, it's classes are challenging and it's rewards are limitless. It's computers are state of the art and it's teachers are easy-going. School starts at nine. So no early wake ups. It is very new and very small. Great building and great architecture. Though it sounds perfect. There are still little flaws that have many students transfering to nearby schools. As for my son he is now trying to attend a different school. For some reason Hockinson was just a little too crazy for him.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
15%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
73%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
64%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students70%
Female79%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income58%
Not low income75%
Special education15%
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students17%
Femalen/a
Male19%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Low income0%
Not low income26%
Special educationn/a
Not special education19%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students80%
Female85%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income62%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income66%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

187 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

164 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

156 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
62%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students90%
Female94%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income82%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students91%
Female95%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income91%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 94% 60%
Hispanic 3% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Two or more races 0% 6%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 18%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 222%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 8N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 64%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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16819 NE 159 St
Brush Prairie, WA 98606
Phone: (360) 448-6450

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