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GreatSchools Rating

Woodmont Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 480 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Parent involvement

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted February 27, 2014

I am a previous student and man wow. Ther were way too many rules i got a conduct report for jumping off a 2 foot ledge. I was in the gifted program and i liked that. I really did not like the principal and the p.e teacher. P.e, music and library are only a half hour , boring, and not even every day.


Posted August 27, 2013

Thoroughly impressed with the standards based education my kids have received! Kuddos to the hard working staff!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2012

I believe that this is a great school that supports your students independence and however the principal is often focused on the wrong things. Thier Gifted and Talented program selelction process is very flawed. However, when forced to make a choice about a good school in the district I would definitely choose this school for my child. Lots of nuturing success focused teachers and a family friendly environment. It has a private school feel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2012

So very sad, just a few short years ago Woodmont was an exceptional school. Many good teachers have fled, test scores down and a principal who boarders on the incompetent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

I love Woodmont K-8 because of their commitment to see students succeed! The staff is friendly and have been helpful and understanding in times of family difficulties. Also, the school is relatively small so the student teacher ratio is more balanced.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2009

This school has a fantastic staff. Everyone cares about the students. If you want high standards go here. If you want chaos go somewhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2008

My kids have been in this school since kinder and I have had wonderful results for my kids. Its easy to stay connected .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2007

I really like this school. I have learned so much and was pleased with the way they handle the WASL. I think that the teachers are often rude though. The teachers think that giving a piece of paper to a child will make them learn. If you get more than three a day, you sit in a room doing your work with no questions asked. Although the teachers and discipline are bad the principle is involved in everything. She comes in and checks the classrooms daily. The sports and after school activities aren't very educational. The school only provides track and choir. The parent invlolvement is pretty good. The school and PTA ask for as much volunteers as they can. The dinners and activities that the school has askes for as much parent involvement as possible. Overall i like this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 16, 2007

After a year here, we considered homeschool. Luckily we are now moving out of state to a place that values education. The staff is great, the parents are great, but the district and school philosophies are all wrong! They don't have enough funds for a librarian, however they can afford to hire a teacher to work with our students on taking the WASL. That is really all this school cares about. They don't take the WASL until 3rd grade, yet they had my 2nd grade son stressed out about it! I would say look into homeschooling if you move into this district!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2007

My child was choice enrolled at Woodmont because they offered a full-day Kindergarten program. My original plan was to move him to our local neighborhood school the following year. However, I have been so impressed with the teachers that my intention is to keep him there through 5th grade. I have found their policy of study hall for unfinished school work and/or homework to be a helpful consequence to remind him of when he does not want to do his work. He has only gone to study hall once ~ and he now does his homework and pays attention in class because he does not want to miss recess with his friends.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2006

This is one of the worst schools in the District. Students in grades 3-5 are not permitted to use the playground equipment. The students must wait in long lines to play games. The students are in an overcrowded environment shoulder to shoulder when on the playground. This kind of environment is an invitation to misbehavior. Threats and punitive punishment are the only methods used to guide children's behavior. Children are sent to study hall for unfinished homework assignments during recess. The school has a policy that the students can choose not to go, but if they do so they receive conduct reports, and suspensions. The principal is very hard nosed about everything. There is no room in this school for special education children, because of WASL scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2006

This school has been an great help to my family. I have a kindergarner that is doing very well because of the caring staff and the willingness to get to know each of the students. The children are reviewed often to see how well thier learning process is. The principle is very well involved in all of the classrooms she is allways availible to talk with the families if needed so. You may also call your childs classroom directly if any concerns come about. You can speck with the teachers durning school hours and before and after school over all just an all around friendly place to be. Someone is there if you need.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2005

This is a great school! The staff is great, and very helpful... I have two boys that go there and I could not be happier.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2005

This school provides an enviroment where students feel safe and can learn without the interruption of misbehavior. The Principal is an superb leader of an outstanding school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
62%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
33%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students71%
Female69%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income58%
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Female86%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic68%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income78%
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students66%
Female62%
Male69%
Black33%
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander55%
Hispanic82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income63%
Not low income70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education71%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female71%
Male79%
Black58%
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income63%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students54%
Female65%
Male45%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander64%
Hispanic46%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income42%
Not low income70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students77%
Female83%
Male72%
Black55%
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic67%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income65%
Not low income87%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female83%
Male78%
Black64%
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income73%
Not low income87%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students63%
Female71%
Male56%
Black36%
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income46%
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female85%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income72%
Not low income75%
Special educationn/a
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female100%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic91%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income94%
Not low income75%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students53%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students63%
Femalen/a
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Femalen/a
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students44%
Femalen/a
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 33% 60%
Hispanic 23% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 15% 7%
Black 14% 5%
Two or more races 11% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 117%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 249%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 9N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 61%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Donna Bogle

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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26454 16th Av South
Des Moines, WA 98198
Phone: (253) 945-4500

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