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GreatSchools Rating

Cedarcrest High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted December 2, 2013

My daughter attended. She has learning challenges, the teachers were very reluctent to accomadate her needs. Some were even reluctent to talk about how to give her the best chance of success. Very inflexable and nonresponsive. If you have the choice go somewhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2013

I went to cedarcrest for 4 years and while it isn't awful it isn't great either. Some of the teachers are super nice but when I think about it there are only about 5 I enjoyed having a class with. other teachers are awful! like a reviewer said before they should not be around children and are very unprofessional, same goes for many of the higher-ups in the school. The school is quite small but I liked that part about it. food is really bad, don't even think about enrolling your kid if they have any extreme food allergies, I did and the school did not care at all about cross contamination. I was out of school sick often because of this. The football games are fun because all of the funds for the school goes straight to football while other sports have to fundraiser to afford a bus to go to their own games. There is the average amount of bullying I see in other high schools but it really depends on the kids. If you can avoid it, don't bring your kids here
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 18, 2011

I'd been going to this school for going on three years, I recently switched to the CLIP alternative school. This school is a joke, the adminastration are rediculious, the teachers are unprofessional, and really shouldn't be around children. You'd be lucky to have 1 teacher a year that actually cared about you. I went through a tough time and my councilor tried to force me out of my school every chance he got, into clip, which is not the education I wanted for myself. The students are cruel, there's drama left and right. Just an all around bad environment for anyone. Don't send your children here. Please.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 3, 2009

Cedarcrest is a small high school with a big heart. The teachers are dedicated and the staff is awesome. The kids are a pretty tight bunch and really care about each other. We live 2 blocks away and love hearing the band practice, the football games and not having to drive our kids to school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2008

I am currently a student at CHS and the teachers there are willing to do what they need to do to get you to where you want to go. While offering only the classes that would be needed in the 'real' world, they make them incredibly fun and interesting. The teachers know how to put the fun in a class while still teaching you EVERYTHING you need to know. Although the hallways are crowded, that doesn't affect my school life at all, we just don't have the money to expand them. The teachers also show how tough real life can be and make it as realistic as life will be when we get out. Cedarcrest is a safe environment and is a great place to learn and have fun.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 17, 2008

i just moved to this school and i absolutely hate it. there isn't enough room for the students to walk in the classes and it takes about three minutes just to walk down the hallway!
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 8, 2008

I went to this school for 4 years and if I could go back I would...The teachers are amazing and their level of commitment is impressive. They totally care about how well the students do during class, I am an example of this. I had trouble through every math class I took, but each of my teachers were perfectly willing to help me find the proper answers. Without that there is no way I could have passed any of my math classes. And most of the teachers there have great attitudes towards the students and love to keep it friendly as long as everyone is still willing to do the work. The only people I can think of that ever suffered while going to this school were the people who did not try in class, and those who made a reputation for themselves of being 'bad'.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 3, 2004

I attended and graduated from CHS. It is not just school pride that causes me to proclaim that Cedarcrest is the best High school I have ever had the pleasure of being involved with. I have now taught in two states, which has given me the opportunity to see it from both sides of the fence. The faculty and staff at Cedarcrest care, however, they are not going to baby the students as they are preparing them for the 'real' world, or college. They will not coddle the students through school, if your child is struggling, they are always more than happy to help, however, do not expect them to give your child an easy A. The basis for education is learning.If graduating were easy the US gov. could just issue a certificate to everyone and save the tax payers a lot $. Take advantage of CHS's opportunities for your student.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 10, 2004

My son has been at CHS for three years. Each year seems to get better. As a parent, I find the staff & the teachers to be great to work with. They keep us very informed about the progress of our child. I feel they go the extra mile. The leadership at CHS is fantastic. The principal & vice principal are very approachable and very interested in what is best for the students. They put in a lot of time and energy and they too go the extra mile. I have a great deal of repect for these men. The environment at CHS is very friendly as well as very safe.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2004

Cedarcrest has wonderful teachers, administrators and coaches that care about each student as unique individuals. I have been a parent here at Cedarcrest since 1996 and I look forward to being here until 2008. It is sad to hear that parents have pulled their children out of the school and put the sole blame on a few uncaring students and busy faculty members. Much of the frustration, I am sure, has to do with the individuals and their own personal needs and attitudes towards life's daily battles. There are many different programs offered in our district and outside our bounderies that can help each student excel at their own pace and achieve success. It is obvious to me that those who choose to devote their time and energy to 'be the best they can be' will succeed. I applaud the efforts of the students and the faculty at Cedarcrest HS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2004

I teach the graphics program. We have a very strong vocational program. Students have access to excellent software in the engineering and graphics fields. Student interest is very strong. Many students go into graphics related careers after high school. Overall I think the school has quite a bit to commend it. Our students are great and we have many fine teachers.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 12, 2004

I totally agree with the first posting on this site. My daughter has had a terrible struggle at this school and alot of it has had to do with the terrible treatment by the seniors towards the freshman. I have brought it to the attention of the principal and counselor and they both deny that any abuse/bullying occurs. And the teachers attitudes towards the students is hardly anything that promotes a desire to be in school. After this year there is no way I will have my daughter in the Riverview school district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2004

Cedarcrest is a safe caring environment for our youth. The small town appeal of Duvall extends to Cedarcrest where everyone feels the warmth of our community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2004

Take it from someone who went to this school day in and day out for 4 years: It is awesome! I found the teachers were very helpful and would work with students until they understood. In reply to the comment before, there are always students who want to give up and you can find that at any school. The smaller school made the teacher/student relationship far stronger than those in larger schools. I loved attending CHS and if I could go back, I would do it again!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 9, 2003

As a former student at Cedarcrest, and now a college student, I can say that this high school gave me a great education, and has some of the most caring staff avaiable. Talking with fellow students at University I have discussed how they felt about their high school experience. I felt sorry for many because they had such a negative response. They were extremely impressed when I discussed the commitment of the staff at CHS, and the willingness to aid students in improving academically. Each deptarment has teachers that are more then qualified to teach their subject, and provide material that is challenging to every student. The Englsih and Math deptparments are extremely challenging and provide an education second to none. Not only are the academics excellent, but the extracurricular activities at Cedarcrest encourage not only success on the playing field, but promote the growth of the student athlete socially and emotionally. Being heavily involved in these programs at CHS, and now at the collegiate level I can see that these qualities are hard to find at every high school. The education that I recieved at Cedarcrest is one that has prepared me very well for Unviersity, and has helped give me the skills to be successful for future endeavors. I am proud to be an alumni of Cedarcrest High school.


Posted June 16, 2003

I pulled my daughter out of this school after only two months. The teachers were rude and unwilling to help. It was like they didn't even want to be there. All the teachers,principals she encountered were unwilling to offer help and were extremely mean. While some kids do good in this school, I have talked to many kids who want to give up on school, they feel that they can't succeed in this school. Their teachers are unwilling to help because they don't seem to care! I would not suggest this school to anyone who wants their kids to succeed.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

119 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
87%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
48%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
80%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
94%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
19%

2011

 
 
32%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
62%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
77%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students78%
Female73%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income79%
Not low income78%
Special educationn/a
Not special education78%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students26%
Female33%
Male22%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Low income18%
Not low income30%
Special education38%
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students83%
Female87%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income59%
Not low income87%
Special education52%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students94%
Female96%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income100%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students30%
Femalen/a
Male18%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education27%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students30%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

198 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
53%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

234 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

204 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
61%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

233 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students92%
Female97%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income83%
Not low income94%
Special education77%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students94%
Female99%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income90%
Not low income95%
Special education77%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 60%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
Two or more races 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 217%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 70%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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29000 NE 150th St
Duvall, WA 98019
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 844-4803

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