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GreatSchools Rating

Kentlake High School

Public | 9-12 | 1753 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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23 reviews of this school


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Posted February 6, 2012

Reading another comment, I strongly agree. Many KL teachers would make you believe if you didn't make one deadline on a project you might as well give up and fail the project or even the class. I transferred my senior year not only because teachers were unhelpful, but also because the students really were allowed to be defiant and outright rude to faculty and other students with little or no punishment. (I even witness students cuss at teachers with no repercussions) Also - SERIOUS drug problem. Students smoke and drink and get high on pills at school and almost never get caught.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 29, 2011

I've taught at 12 of the 13 secondary schools in the Kent District, and of those 12, Kentlake is the only one with a serious attitude problem. The kids there act like they run the school, because they do. They have more power than the adults because the school is run so weakly. Example: I was talking to a security guard who said that security there never takes phones away from students by force. He said it could injure the student and that the students must be tiptoed around. Neither the adults nor students seem to realize its supposed to be the other way around. The result is a rude, defiant, dishonest student body despite their not being that way at the feeder middle schools. Test scores are OK, although they'd be higher if students cared and did their work honestly. Easily my least favorite school in the district since I love the other Kent schools.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 30, 2011

I had to stop by Kentlake when the bell rang for the day to end. OOPS wrong time to be at a busy high school. I was pleasantly surprised that the students were polite and did not run me over to leave. The office staff was kind and helpful. Then it was time to leave along with 1600 students. I was again surprised at the polite way the drivers (mostly students) took turns. They drove carefully and even allowed people from a nearby housing development to merge. I was proud of the students!! Today was teacher conference; the teachers were well prepared and very nice. I met with my son's school counselor; she helped him arrange a class he needed. Wow, it was painless. I am thankful my son has the opportunity to attend KLHS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2011

3 of my children graduated or will graduate from Kentlake in the classes of '09, '10, and '11. Overall, I feel there are a few good teachers that care about student progress and one administrator that puts the students first . There is a new principal this year and it is too soon to tell if there will be any improvements. But, during the years my children were at Kentlake, there was a definite disconnect between administrators, teachers, and students. Numerous teachers made it very challenging for students to seek help from them, were apathetic when a student was struggling in class, and favoritism was prevalent at the school. Teachers were also allowed to dock a students grade for non-academic matters. I found this to be ludicrous and received no support from administrators when I attempted to address the issue. Academics are the only thing that should be reflected in a grade. I will say this, if you want to be an athlete, attend Kentlake. Sports and the athletes are favored here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2010

Poor leadership and direction and focus. Lack of diversity in teaching methods and materials. Teacher apathy and minimal effort exhibited by majority of staff. Heavy presence of cliques and grouping by stereotype, or ethnic heritage. Kent schools in general are below average, if you want evidence check the state department of education web sites
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2010

I am a student at Kentlake and this is my first year and so far i strongly dislike it. The teachers expect you to be perfect and never make a mistake. They mess up on attendence all the time so if your parent checks skyward alot you get in trouble! Alot of the teachers favors the students who are into sports and cheerleading. So if your someone who doesn't like stuff like that then your not going to really like the class. Alot of the students have drug problems so that was another downer. I don't really like the school because a) out in middle of nowhere' b) administrative makes no effort on concerns c)students are rich stuckups d) gotta watch teachers closely
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 10, 2009

to me kentlake is the best school i had ever been to. The teachers are so nice and they dont grade you as hard as you would really thnk they do.Its almost the end of the year and this whole year i had kept my grades up to like A or A-. I love the teachers. They dont give as much hw as someother schools. And the students there are the best..... come to this school and you will see what im talking about....have fun
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 7, 2008

Kentlake is a great school. Extremely sprited. i really enjoyed my time their this year.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 22, 2007

What happened to teaching children to make them well rounded, educated individuals? Focus here is on WASL preparation. Each teacher is given latitude to create their own rules and policies so students must try to remember six different sets of rules and policies. Students can be punished academically for minor class disruption. Message given to students is if you miss one deadline in a large project you might as well give up because if you miss one deadline you get a zero on the entire project. Wow! This is not the message that our children should be given by those in charge of educating them. As for the principal, do not expect her to respond to your concerns in a timely manner. After three months I requested that someone else assist me with my concerns. The assistant principal did not even give the courtesy of being prepared for a scheduled meeting.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2007

Kentlake is an astounding school. I have just transferred in, and yes, there are a few things that need furtherance, such as how papers are graded, however, the teachers and students are welcoming and helpful. Kentlake overall has been a great experience for me.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 12, 2007

With an ineffective leader in charge, Kentlake continues down its path to mediocrity. While there are a few good teachers, most leave for the neighboring school district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2007

I feel that over the last 2 years that the reputation Kentlake had is in steady decline with much of the problems coming from teachers who are far too eager to be friends to the students instead of mentors and role models.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 15, 2005

I attended Kentlake for three years and now I am working full time. Kentlake taught me many things while I was there. Although while learning at kentlake I felt like I was in a prison. The teachers will only let you get a drink of water and/or go to the bathroom if you rasie your hand and ask nicely. Also I did not like the principle. I felt she wasnt involved enough in the school and that she was 'to good' for kentlake. The sports and extracurricular activities were really good.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted November 3, 2005

Tis School is the best. The teachers are Outstanding and the Principals are Superior.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 21, 2005

Kentlake really is a nice school. There are a few details parents need to keep on top of, such as grading, and making sure your student is getting good grades, and that is assisted with Kentlake's online grading server called Basmati, a nightmare for kids but a wonderful tool for parents. Basmati is upgraded by teachers and shows your student's grade in that class, which is a great system that I have found helpful. It has band, choir, drama, orchestra, and LOTS of clubs such as Ski Club, and Key Club.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 18, 2005

the school is great but they need to cut back on students in each classroom.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2004

Kentlake is an awesome school to attend. I have never seen a school with so much school spirit. It is amazing. The football games are always packed, no matter where the boys are playing. We have incredible athletic programs and coaches. Our new administration this year is amazing. Hats off to them. They made each and everyday so much fun. Without a doubt, i would recommend kentlake high. Go falcons!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 3, 2004

Kentlake is one of the worst things ever to happen to me. It is a very exclusive environment. Due partly to its location out in the middle of nowhere, almost all the students have gone to school together since they were really young and generally have no interest in building relationships with outsiders. Only the star athletes and their fan clubs are shown appreciation in assemblies and such, as well as through favoritism in class. Those teachers who are there to teach, not to coach sports, are usually excellent. The pretentious atmosphere in the student body leads to a lot of bullying and harassment, and it is the exceptionally bright or nonconforming students who get the brunt of it. Nobody in power cares. A lot of my good friends, all incredibly intelligent, dropped out of school because of this treatment. It's tragic that the school doesn't watch out for these students.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 17, 2004

As a student at Kentlake High School I feel that Kentlake has given me alot. Kentlake is a wonderful place to go to school. Kentlake is an awesome school. The students show their school spirit, they are really nice most of the time and the staff controll us with care unless we get into fights then they have to take action.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 11, 2004

After leaving Kentlake, and attending the University of Puget sound, I realized just how inadequetly Kentlake prepared me for college.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

152 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
34%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
72%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
24%

2011

 
 
25%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

385 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
53%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

164 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
51%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
35%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students36%
Female37%
Male34%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander10%
Hispanic14%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Low income29%
Not low income43%
Special education29%
Not special education36%
Limited English11%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students88%
Female87%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic82%
Multiracial90%
White90%
Low income86%
Not low income90%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students16%
Female22%
Male10%
Black0%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Low income5%
Not low income32%
Special education0%
Not special education22%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students65%
Female64%
Male65%
Black35%
Asian61%
Asian/Pacific Islander53%
Hispanic45%
Multiracial91%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income43%
Not low income80%
Special education14%
Not special education71%
Limited English6%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students64%
Female63%
Male65%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander62%
Hispanic50%
Multiracial92%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income50%
Not low income76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education65%
Limited English18%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students26%
Female10%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low income23%
Not low income29%
Special education20%
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students31%
Female27%
Male33%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White47%
Low income39%
Not low income23%
Special educationn/a
Not special education32%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

390 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
54%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

394 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

411 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
51%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

386 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students83%
Female86%
Male80%
Black69%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic80%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income70%
Not low income93%
Special education35%
Not special education89%
Limited English25%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students87%
Female92%
Male82%
Black73%
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income77%
Not low income94%
Special education43%
Not special education92%
Limited English39%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 66% 60%
Hispanic 11% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 7%
Black 7% 5%
Two or more races 6% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 15%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 234%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 22N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 65%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Nurse(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Swimming pool
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Joe Potts

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Swimming pool
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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21401 SE 300 St
Kent, WA 98042
Phone: (253) 373-4900

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