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GreatSchools Rating

Harrison Preparatory School

Public | 6-12 | 500 students

International Baccalaureate MYP Programme
 
 

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted June 11, 2014

This is a great place to learn, mature and participate in school and community activities. My son has so enjoyed the relationships he has been able to make with teachers during his high school years. Having the same caring teachers for four years did wonders for him. He is now prepared for anything life may throw at him. Parents who make the effort to partner with this school will be greatly rewarded.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2014

My family has been dealing with HP for the past two years, and have never been more disappointed with a school, or a district, ever. The administration at the school are mostly rude and short, and it is hard to get anything accomplished. Phone calls are not returned and the fact that they have a principal, a VP and a dean of students and still can't run a school well should tell you something.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2013

My daughter is in 6th grade and it is her first year. The school seems very disorganized and staffs/teachers are poorly guided. It seems there seriously lack communication and do not even respond to parents' calls. I am going to wait to see how the rest of this year goes and if it continues like this, I am definitely putting my daughter in another school. It just seems there is no pride in quality of education and mentoring students. Perhaps their focus is more on older students in high school...I am not sure. It has been very disappointing dealing with them as it seems they do not take responsibility. I plan on bringing this to the principal's attention to see how she handles. - a very concerned parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 28, 2013

i went to Harrison prep during 7th grade and sense i moved to fort belvoir in Virginia because of being in the military i miss the teachers that helped me during school and after school i also miss the students.I liked how the teachers helped when you were failing classes by explaining it better.i think Harrison prep should be a little bigger and have locker rooms and only have 6-12 grade because everyone got along better and just adding like kids will be very distracting because of the screaming and etc.... this school is the best out of all schools i have been to.i wish it didn't have to changes.


Posted March 11, 2013

I am not sure what Harrison the other people are talking about here but our experience with Harrison has been lack luster, The Principal is rude and unengaged and the teachers are for the most part awful. My daugheter's test scores and gpa have plummetted due the lack of teaching. They are disorganized and horrible to work with. If you complain then they take it out on your student. Diligently looking for another school for my child to attend!!! 6th grade was a waste of time..I only pray that it is not too late to get my child back on track!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2012

LOVE THIS SCHOOOOOL!!! it is amazing! I love how small it is and how excited my child is to go to school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2012

Hello, I am a mother of a child with special needs, I think this is the school is that he needs, I would like to make an appointment with the school counselor as soon as possible, and that can help me as to their needs. Thank you very much!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2012

Hi I am a 7th grade student and I used to go to harrison prep this was one of my very favorite schools my family is in the military so we move around alot and this school is so welcoming and kind the teachers are good the kids are nice the kids there don't bully people. At the school that I have been going to there has been bullying like nothing I've ever seen. I went to freedom park elementary but the teachers were terrible so this is my first day being homeschooled. Harrison prep is one of the best schools I have ever been to the only thing that I would change about it is maybe to get lockers.


Posted July 15, 2009

This school feels like a private school without the high price tag. My son has always been bored to death at school but now faces challenges that make him push himself to new learning. The staff and the principal are caring people who will work hard to make sure that kids are well taken care of. We feel lucky to have our student at a school where high academic rigor is the norm.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2009

i am a student here, i love it, i am on this site because students need to be also, to help the adults understand us better, i say this but i am more of an adult in the way i act then i am a child. also this is the best school i have been to. i went to camas prairie in spanaway, also i went to park lodge, it is a school in lakewood also. but of all the schools this is the absolute best. it is very small, only 400 students in the entire school. no way it should get less than 5 stars!
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 21, 2008

This is a small truly progressive school based on principles founded on the Coalition of Essential Schools. It is excellent for students who are interested in science and technology and plan on being college ready. The one thing our family really likes is they do not tolerate disrespectful behavior or bullying. Mrs. Boyd the principal is very proactive as are the staff of young professionals. This school is not for everybody. It has students from 5th grade through 12th grade who are hard working and seeking a more rigorous academic environment but may enter the school struggling. This school was almost our last resort. We were tired of the bullying and lack of curriculum and help in other local public schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
54%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
30%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students55%
Female52%
Male60%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Low income52%
Not low income59%
Special educationn/a
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female79%
Male75%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income71%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female77%
Male72%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic59%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income73%
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female71%
Male70%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income76%
Not low income65%
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students69%
Female80%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic55%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income70%
Not low income68%
Special educationn/a
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students49%
Female47%
Male51%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic41%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income28%
Not low income69%
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female75%
Male69%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income59%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students65%
Female65%
Male64%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic63%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income51%
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
47%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
80%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
86%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
64%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students79%
Female82%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low incomen/a
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special education100%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students80%
Female65%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income75%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students86%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students86%
Female93%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

25 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

41 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
60%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 51% 60%
Hispanic 20% 20%
Two or more races 13% 6%
Black 10% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 12%N/A8%
Special education 12%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 245%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school CPSD Elementary Schools
Percentage of students going to 2-year college 10% (2013)
Percentage of students going to 4-year college 80% (2013)
Percentage of students going to the military 5% (2013)
Percentage of students going to vocational programs 5% (2013)
Colleges most students attend after graduation University of Washington
Central Washington University
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 4N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 75%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff German
Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • Washington State Achievement Award (2012)
  • Washington State Achievement Award (2011)

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Science lab
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Computer programming

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Industrial / graphic design
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama
Clubs
  • Anime club
  • Drama club
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • German
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Kitchen
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Advanced placement courses
  • International Baccalaureate (IB)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Clubs
  • National Honor Society
School leaders can update this information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School start time
  • 9:00 am
School end time
  • 3:30 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Lisa Boyd
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (253) 583-5417

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Advanced placement courses
  • College prep
  • College preparatory
  • International Baccalaureate (IB)
  • Project-based
  • Standards-based
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Computer programming
  • Industrial / graphic design

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • German
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Career/college counseling
  • Counseling
  • Differentiated learning programs
  • Mentoring
  • Remediation
  • Tutoring
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • In-district transp. only.
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Computer lab
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Music room
  • Playground
  • Science lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Intramural Interest-Based
Girls sports
  • Intramural Interest-Based

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Anime club
  • Chess club
  • Drama club
  • Game club
  • National Honor Society
  • Student council/government
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
More from this school
  • Harrison Preparatory IB School is dedicated to working collectively with parents and community partners to develop a premier school of choice in the Clover Park School District. We are committed to provided an excellent college preparatory experience which will prepare students to actively participate in a global society.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?


10 out of 10students were accepted for the 2013-2014 school year.


Students accepted for the 2013-2014 school year
200
Applications received for the 2013-2014 school year
200
Students typically come from these schools
CPSD Elementary Schools

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
University of Washington
Central Washington University
College preparation / awareness offered
College prep programs/courses during the year
College presentations or information sessions
SAT/ACT prep classes
School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Students' post-graduation plans in 2013
2 year college - 10%
4 year college - 80%
Military - 5%
Vocational - 5%
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

8800 121st St SW
Lakewood, WA 98498
Website: Click here
Phone: (253) 583-5418

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