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GreatSchools Rating

Cedarcrest School

Public | 6-8 | 839 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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20 reviews of this school


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Posted January 22, 2014

I am in hi-cap classes and in advanced math. I feel that the teachers are great at teaching and getting you ready for the next grade. The only reason i think the others feel that Juarez goes to fast is that there is so many standards that have to be met for every district that most of the kids fall behind. Besides being a great school based on its teachers and staff, i absolutely hate the amount of cursing i hear every day, and its not just the 8th graders but new 6th graders that are coming from the elementary schools that are acting like they rule the school. In Conclusion for that little note there: The teachers and staff need to indorse a better no cursing rule. Its in the rule book but when they hear cursing they don't do any thing about them.all in all this is a great school and i recommend it for any kid who is looking for some fast knowledge. -Hannah (student)


Posted July 19, 2012

i love this school.i am a student at cedarcrest middle school.when i started poy in 6th grade i had a hard year most of the students were very rude.the math teachers were nice and did their best to help to help the students i feelt that Mrs Juarez moved way too fast and that mr.bickford take time to explain everything and help which most of the time he did not answer with questions. In 7th grade the teacher were more helpful expect foe a handful of them.


Posted February 3, 2011

I have a Son in 7th grade there currently and so far so good. I do feel that the Teachers don't really reach out to the parents from what I see so far. The exception is Mrs Juarez (6th grade math). She sends out weekly emails of what is coming up and what the kids are doing. She let us parents now when extra help was available. If a child didn't succeed in her class it was NOT her fault, she did her best. The other Teachers so far don't reach out to us but do respond if I contact them. My Son is a part of a Triangle between Him, Teachers and his parents. We hold him accountable for his work and keep an I on Skyward, his Teachers teach him the best they can and he asks questions if he has problems. If we notice his grades dropping a little we ask him questions and talk to the teacher if a little help is needed. So far the triangle has worked and the teachers have really held up there side as well. I always let him know that in order for it all to work he has to apply his best effort and then everything will fall into place. EFFORT is the most important, not the overall grade
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2010

This school does not teach that if you fail to do the work, you fail the grade and will repeat it. The explanation I have been given for this is that it is emotionally detrimental for the child to be held back. I say: garbage. If they continue to pass my child on that is not doing the work it will re-enforce that I, as his parent, don't know what the heck I'm talking about when I tell him what real-life consequences are AND it will be far more detrimental to his future to have to learn these lessons when he is in high school and beyond. He now has bad habits that will affect the rest of his life: where/if he goes to college, his job, his self-esteem, his work ethics.. the list goes. The teachers blame parents, I blame the school for not supporting my efforts at home.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2009

I agree with another post, the discipline and order is out of control. I don't know if this is because of the ratio of students to staff is too many or what. My grandson is now attending another district and he is doing much better.


Posted December 16, 2009

I am a parent, a daughter of a teacher and alumni to Cedarcrest. I believe the teachers do an excellent job at reaching out to the parents and students. It is the parents who fail to connect with their children and to the teachers. It is also the students who fail to take accountability for their work. I believe the standards should stay high because if they don't continue to challenge them then what does that tell our kids about working hard to reach a goal?


Posted February 20, 2009

The discipline and order in this school is awful. I teach there and have inside view. There is no intervention by administration unless students do something extreme. Chronic, low level disruptive behavior by many students is what is destroying the learning environment. I wouldn't allow my own child to attend this school!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 20, 2008

I go to this school and I think that ALL the teachers are wonderfull and supportive. They also push us to do our best and achieve our goals. Written By: Hailey and Jessie
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 2, 2008

This school makes constantly failed efforts at improving discipline and staff/student relations. They don't attempt to connect to parents or the community at all. Their test scores aren't too bad so at least the basic information is getting thru to most students but I agree that the one's who struggle are overlooked. I work there but I am not a teacher.


Posted December 12, 2007

I am a student at Cedercrest and truthfully I think most of the failings is due to the fact that some, not all, of the teachers set standards too high and fail to take in the general picture of their class, and so their students fail. Although it is very clean, I hope to get transferred soon too.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 28, 2007

I used to be a student at CederCrest and honestly it was one of the greatest schools i have ever attended. The staff and students are amazing and the academic classes are wonderful.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 16, 2007

Cedarcrest is a great school. I love it there! The staff and teachers are so nice.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 5, 2007

I initiated contact with all of my daughter's teachers at the beginning of school. I am home schooling her next year! No, the teachers do not give regular feedback to students and challenge them to achieve their personal best. They do not go to great lengths to care for and support students personally.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2005

This school is not very engaged in the success of the student, they often comment 'I have 30 students how can I focus on one'. If you do not monitor Basmati closely you may not realize your student is in trouble as the teacher's will not contact you. They are not agressive on discipline and allow inappropriate classroom behavior from both students and teachers. Teachers in my opinion to take ownership for the success of their students. The school is clean and maintained.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2005

I think that the teachers try very hard at getting kids ready for the following years. I do beleive that the school is over populated and so there are many kids that are left at the end of the school year behind some of the other children. The reading program needs to be worked out and have a revised and better program brought to the school. Over all I think that the teachers care and try to manage with what they have.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2005

Discipline? What needs to be done? Discipline? I have found that some Teachers just assume the worst in children. You know when I was in school we had kids that were distruptive and had a really difficult time sitting down and learning because they were hyper. No doubt that this is a problem, when they determined that there was a child that was special in that way they put them in a special classroom with other kids that they could relate to and maybe learn to understand how they are acting by seeing it first hand. Yes I admit it took a special teacher to deal with it, but it seemed to work very well. What happened to this system. Hyper children are not lost causes so why are they being treated this way. This school I have found to be the worst about that. seems unfair for the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2004

A student that has failed over 90% of his classes for two years does not deserve to move on to the next grade. Your school is setting these children up for a let down in life. If they don't do the work, they shouldn't pass. Don't move them forward for doing nothing. That's like getting a reward for doing no work. If we don't show up for work, we do not get payed. Same rules shall apply for our children. If they don't do their home work, they don't pass, if they don't turn their work in, they don't pass! That is reallity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2004

I went to this school and my experience was not at all good. This school has the worst security and discipline system. They suspend a student for the most ridiculous reasons, most suspensions are not justified in any way. Considering this is the best middle school in Marysville, it makes the basic middle school and junior high system in this town completely screwed up.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 3, 2003

You guys are awesome. [I] am a former student of yours and the best teacher is Mr. Vanderver be good to him because he s the best. All you staff is excellent!


Posted June 17, 2003

Disruptive children in the classroom inhibit my child's ability to learn. The administration does not do enough to improve discipline.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

302 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
46%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

301 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

260 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
45%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

261 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
52%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

242 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

290 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
36%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

289 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

292 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female53%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asian58%
Asian/Pacific Islander57%
Hispanic31%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Low income41%
Not low income47%
Special education4%
Not special education51%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female69%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asian83%
Asian/Pacific Islander79%
Hispanic53%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Low income57%
Not low income70%
Special education13%
Not special education72%
Limited English6%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students39%
Female43%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asian47%
Asian/Pacific Islander44%
Hispanic35%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income28%
Not low income51%
Special education5%
Not special education45%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female68%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander78%
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low income52%
Not low income68%
Special education8%
Not special education68%
Limited English24%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students48%
Female62%
Male34%
Blackn/a
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander78%
Hispanic37%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Low income39%
Not low income56%
Special education10%
Not special education54%
Limited English18%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students39%
Female43%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander55%
Hispanic24%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White44%
Low income31%
Not low income47%
Special education0%
Not special education45%
Limited English13%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female68%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asian65%
Asian/Pacific Islander64%
Hispanic51%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income52%
Not low income70%
Special education8%
Not special education69%
Limited English19%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students46%
Female45%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asian55%
Asian/Pacific Islander55%
Hispanic28%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Low income37%
Not low income54%
Special education5%
Not special education52%
Limited English6%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students94%
Female93%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White95%
Low income96%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 59% 60%
Hispanic 20% 20%
Two or more races 10% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 3% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 16%N/A8%
Special education 113%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 253%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 51%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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6400 88th St NE
Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 657-6479

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