Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Oak Harbor High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

30 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 3, 2014

We are very happy with this school. They have high expectations for students, excellent school communication, a wide variety of student programs and activities, and are very organized and on top of things. We'd definitely recommend this school to others!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2014

Like most public schools, they push the kids through, collect the money and ask for more. No accountability for employees and blatant lies to parents. The whole district has this issue, to bad there is no other options for parents and children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2014

Oak Harbor HS is one of the best I have been to. The staff and the Administration care. There is a great level of parent involvement and school spirit. It has been a very easy transition for the kids
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2013

One important note:the school was completely renovated in 2010 so all prior reviews on the facilities are not completely valid. This school is competent, and beautiful. Offers a wide variety of award winning career and technical training: auto shop,metal design,CAD,culinary and video production. The school website will reveal many AP courses (13). My child took 5 over the course of 2 years. He scored a 4 on AP-History and 2/1 on the AP physics, language, calc, and World History; so not stellar performance. Can't necessarily blame the educators,but want to note that he received A's in regular class room; possibly due to the RE-DO policy. I am not impressed with the English instruction - see parent Nov 2010 review, still holds true today. Only major complaint is the fact that my child will receive A's on work that I would evaluate as B- or below. There is hardly any homework, and the school implements a "RE-DO" policy that hardly encourages the kids to try hard the first time around. As with any school, there are great teachers and teachers that should have retired long ago,who have lost their zest for education. Staff parental communication is hit or miss.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2012

I enjoyed this school. I just graduated last year, the first class to graduate from the completely renovated school. The hallways are slightly bigger and classrooms are too, but I think they could have better shaped classes and all indoor hallways. All of the teachers and administrators are interested in the well being of students and their success. I felt very close to each of my teachers. I think it helps that many teachers are in their 20's or 30's, and are coaches and club leaders, making them more relatable to students and more access-able. The perception that "drug use is on the rise" can be misleading as the students move through the grade levels and more people are exposed and start using. But no one knows how many people in each grade are using drugs except if they see them using. accusations and surveys cannot be an accurate representation because nothing is honest. I think that the career and tech classes and AP classes prepared me well for college and the school definitely works very hard to prepare students for a future that will be productive. Some rules seem unreasonable from a student stand point, but they are not up to the school, rather the district and state.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 20, 2011

Our family is very happy with OHHS. A lot of schools are cutting important programs like AP and career and tech. Others are eliminating sports and activites. OHHS has maintained very strong programs in all these areas. Plus, the school facilities are amazing! We are impressed!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 16, 2011

This school has so much potential, the facilities are fantastic but true to the entire district, appearances are more important than substance. Teachers here are generally uninvolved and uninterested, administrators are worse, a large number of students are miltary and fairly transient, only here for a few years so the staffs accountability level is pathetic. The english and math departments are rediculously lacking. Example of staff involvement.. the last teacher or staff post here was dated 2006.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 18, 2010

the new building is nice, but the curb appeal doesn't bring excellence into the classrooms. I would say from watching my student, the English dept. is extremely lacking. There is little accountability to be held by the teachers and unless you have a very proactive teacher, students slip through the cracks. Thankfully our student has been blessed with 3 good teachers the past 2 years; teachers who try different teaching methods for different students and work with the parents for added success. Other than that, if it wasn't for additional home-schooling, my student wouldn't even know how to use punctuation, capitalization or proper grammer. It's hard to only blame the middle school, when the high schools giving him A's on such work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2008

Hi-- No offense to the student posting on 8/25, but OHHS's WASL scores are far from outstanding. Look at the state average and see how the hgh school compares--I haven't seen 2008 data, but science and math scores from last year aren't outstanding
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 25, 2008

Everyone keeps saying how awful ohhs is, but I've been to 2 other highschools and I think it's amazing. Our wasl scores are outstanding and all of the problem are finally getting fixed.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 3, 2008

I'm a student at this school and I agree with the poster two posts ago. Drug use is pretty much on the rise. I know of several fellow freshman that are at least smoking and skipping their afternoon classes. A few sophmores that smoke pot and skip days entirely. I also feel that the acidemic level of this school is terribly low. Maybe i just had too high of an expectation. I also would like to add that I'm glad we got a new stadium. Our old stadium was muddy, and horrible. Band was a complete disaster for the marching season. Our new one is nice, but I'm glad there is going to be a modernization of our high school. Our hallways are so small, and the doors open into the hallways sometimes making everything come to a stand still. (there is mold in the stage and the band room leaks)
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 1, 2007

The previous writer is not being fair or honest. A new $8 million stadium, yes, but the writer fails to mention that a $74 million modernization of the entire high school is underway. They're not just going to fix Parker Hall. They're building a complete new one, along with bigger classrooms and wider hallways. And, by the way, drug use is NOT on the rise. Iit is well below state averages, according to very thorough and long-term surveys.


Posted October 2, 2007

Oak Harbor High School lacks in maintaining the educatonal levels found in other school districts in the state. The disciplinary problems a the high school are rampant with drug use on on the rise. The school board found it appropriate to build a nine million dollar football stadium, yet Parker Hall continues to flood when it rains, the classrooms are small and the hall ways very narrow. Overall, Oak Harbor High School is a disgrace to the community unless of course you are a football fan.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2007

I think the running start program and other alternatives to the high school are the best things about Oak Harbor High School. There are some really good people that work at the school, but its the exception not the rule. I have had three children attend this school over the past six years and feel the overall condition is only getting worse.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2006

Running Start is fantastic Acedemics at the High School needs more funding to be successful. Plenty of Extracurricular activities with good competitivness considering this school has a large military attendence that comes and goes over few years. There is plenty of opportunity for parent involvement, just ask where needed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2006

Although the school is up for a 'remodel,' it's too late to help those students already there. Hopefully, with the onset of the remodel, they will further improve the quality of their staff. There is a good selection of electives and, as long as you are willing to keep 'on them,' you can make sure your student has 'good' teacher. The sports teams will, hopefully, have a stadium soon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2006

Oak Harbor High School is intentional about improvement. The administration, staff and parents are engaged in ongoing data collection and review in an effort to improved student learning and student experience. It is an exceptionally caring community.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 23, 2005

Great experience. Lots of extracurricular activities and opportunities for future planning. Nice campus.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted November 21, 2005

this is truely a great school i recomind it to anyone that wants to raise thier child in a good academic atmostshpere.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 29, 2005

The administration needs to take better control of their special needs children, whether they are on an IEP or 504. They lack the complete knowledge/training to identify and be responsable for these kids. What is important is not only the advanced kids, but ALL kids in the district.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

205 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
92%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
96%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
29%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

253 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
65%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
74%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
45%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students61%
Female62%
Male60%
Black72%
Asian61%
Asian/Pacific Islander61%
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Low income57%
Not low income64%
Special education70%
Not special education61%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students93%
Female94%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income89%
Not low income95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low income96%
Not low income100%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students24%
Female19%
Male27%
Blackn/a
Asian36%
Asian/Pacific Islander33%
Hispanic19%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White20%
Low income20%
Not low income27%
Special education0%
Not special education34%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students64%
Female64%
Male63%
Black42%
Asian61%
Asian/Pacific Islander59%
Hispanic46%
Multiracial60%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income55%
Not low income70%
Special education25%
Not special education71%
Limited English17%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students73%
Female65%
Male79%
Black50%
Asian77%
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income70%
Not low income76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Female35%
Male30%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low income44%
Not low income23%
Special educationn/a
Not special education37%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students42%
Femalen/a
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White46%
Low income46%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education44%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

390 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
39%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

353 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

376 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
42%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

349 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students81%
Female79%
Male83%
Black75%
Asian89%
Asian/Pacific Islander87%
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income71%
Not low income87%
Special education33%
Not special education88%
Limited English36%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students82%
Female89%
Male76%
Black76%
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income73%
Not low income88%
Special education41%
Not special education87%
Limited English55%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 14% 7%
Black 9% 5%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Two or more races 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 236%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 71%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

950 NW 2nd Ave
Oak Harbor, WA 98277
Phone: (360) 279-5701

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Homeconnection
Oak Harbor, WA




Coupeville High School
Coupeville, WA


Cedar Program
Coupeville, WA



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT