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GreatSchools Rating

Olympic View Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 513 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
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2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
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11 reviews of this school


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Posted January 17, 2013

My daughter was in kindergarten for the first half of the school year at OVE before I transferred her to CHE. She came home exhausted and miserable everyday and had homework that would take her an hour to finish, in KINDERGARTEN. Kindergarten is supposed to be FUN! She said her teacher would yell at the class because they weren't sitting still and being quiet while she helped other kids learn to write one on one. There were approximately 35 kids in her class and a teachers aide only came in for an hour once a week. Her teacher even said at the orientation and parent-teacher conference that she was overwhelmed and needed parents to teach their kids how to hold a pencil, cut and paste, help with homework, etc. When I got a notice from the school stating my daughter needed extra help with reading I decided it was time to either transfer her to a different school or homeschool. I talked to friends who have kids at CHE and decided to give it try. So far it's a night and day difference. The school and class sizes are much smaller. The playground is bigger. Her teacher is very friendly and organized. My daughter actually comes home happy! The way kindergartners should be!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2012

This school is horrendous!!! I understand that schools are at a low point and that staffing is very difficult, but it hurts that these teachers are not truly enjoying teaching our children, not to mention the fact that they cannot control their tempers. My son went to this school for 2 years, while in the 2nd grade a teacher decided to put her hands on my son and scream in his face to sit down. When I spoke with the principal about the incident and that I was told by 3 separate students and a parent , her only response was "Are you really going to take the word of a child?" REALLY!!! Not to mention when I asked to press charges and have an investigation, "The school district does not have the time to look into false allegations!" Since then, he has been attending a different school and I can definitely see the joy in his eyes when it's time to go to school=)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2010

My son has special needs and he attended this school while we lived there. They were very accommodating to my sons needs, they followed his strict learning plan that was was placed in his 504. They always called me whenever there was a problem and we talked about it and ways to fix it. I never had a problem. They were great, so far the best out of all of the schools my children have been to. I wish I could say the same about the school he is currently attending here in California now but I can't even come close.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2009

We moved here in the middle of the school year. My son had been in preschool for a year, and kindergarten for half the year before we transferred from California. He was enrolled in OVE and placed in class with a teacher, who I was told, was quite good. I asked to volunteer in the classroom, and was told that they preferred parents volunteer in the library, lunchroom, office or on the playground- not in the classroom. As a parent who volunteered on a weekly basis in her child's class since he had started school, I was a bit taken back by this. Six weeks went by. I went into the class often to talk to the teacher about how he was adjusting and was always told that everything was going well. Then, I get called into a meeting with the principal and teacher. Apparently, even though my son was slightly ahead academically, he was 'a little rambunctious, and sometimes aggressive in class.' When I asked why his behavior wasn't brought to my attention earlier, I was told by the teacher that he didn't have time to talk to every parent every day about what their kids were doing wrong. I thought that was total bs, since I made it a point to approach him on an almost daily basis to ask about my son's progress. I was informed that since his birthday in in October, my son was only accepted to the school on a probationary status. I was not informed of this at the time of his enrollment. The teacher and principal requested that I withdraw him from school and send him back the next year to start all over again. It was a heartbreaking experience for both my son and myself. He cried every day for the next week, because he couldn't go to school. Then when it was finally time for him to go back- he didn't want to. His second try at OVE wasn't much better than the first. His teacher this time around was so disorganized and chaotic, I'm not sure how any of the kids learned anything. I volunteered in the class and was appalled at how out of control everything was. You can't give a group of five year olds three tasks to do, then just let them go and expect them to do it with no help. You'd think a teacher would know this. My son is now in third grade (although he should be in fourth), and it's a fight to get him to go to school or do homework. It kills me that this little boy- who LOVED school, who woke ME up every day, eager to get to school, now hates it. I believe this is a direct result of the experience at OVE, and the teacher's incompetence as an educator and unwillingness to work with parents to help their children. I feel like by not telling me the truth about my son having issues in class, he set my him up for failure because he didn't want to deal with his behavior, or me as a parent. I always got the feeling that the teachers at OVE didn't want to deal with parents. You drop your kids off in front of the classroom and an aid takes them in. You went to pick your kids up and an aid brought them out. The only time I was able to communicate with the teachers was when I went to them. OVE, to me, represents everything that is wrong with education in this country today, and I strongly recommend against sending a child to that school. Almost every parent I know with a child in OVE complains about the school. Several have requested that their child switch to OHE, and some have even put their children in private school, even though it is a huge financial burden.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2008

I had two daughters attend OVE. My oldest went through the 5th grade and my youngest went to 2nd & 3rd. I have to say that the teachers were good with what they had to work with. I know the academics that the teachers are using are below standards and the students progress lack because of that. The only reason some children are passing wasl is because the teachers commit most if not all of each lesson preparing for the wasl. I know the money for this area and school is just not there to make improvements on any level. The PTSA is lacking at this school, the knowledge base is just not there to have a great PTSA. I have since been to a superior, above average school and now know how they operate. I see now what my children missed by attending OVE.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2008

As a military family our transfer into and out of OVE was effortless thanks to an outstanding office staff. My son needed extra help in math and accomodations were made for extra help, and all of my sons needs were met in that area. We are now on the East Coast, and while the schools here are a bit ahead of the Oak Harbor schools, both my school age children were able to adapt easily,and continue to do well. Thank you OVE!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2008

I think if someone is going to give a bad review of a school and express regrets, they should offer more information. I have visited this school often and find the office staff and principal very receptive and the school atmosphere is inviting.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2007

I regrete ever sending my son to OVE, and would never recommend this school to another family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2006

Our daughter attended half of kindergarten and most of 1st grade here. If you are a military family, this school is awesome. They really know how to adapt to families who have spouses coming and going due to deployments. They also know how to welcome a child in the middle of the school year. Academically it seems a little on the slower side but the teachers seem to generally care how your child is doing. As far as I know, there is limited access to music, art & sports. They have a certain day of the week where they instruct in these areas. I believe parent involvment is high however, I have younger children and you are not allowed to volunteer if you have children with you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2005

The school as a whole is okay. It was recently remodeled in the past few years. The teachers are very nice and friendly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2003

Being a full time student myself and working a job it is difficult to acurately rate everything. However last year my child had an honest to goodness awesome teacher. One who was willing to get involved. I have nothing negative after last years experience to say about the teachers in this school. Let's hope this year is the same.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
80%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
48%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
30%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female58%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income57%
Not low income78%
Special education37%
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female79%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income78%
Not low income83%
Special education47%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students48%
Female48%
Male48%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic36%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Low income32%
Not low income61%
Special educationn/a
Not special education51%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female71%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income60%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students54%
Female55%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Low income48%
Not low income58%
Special educationn/a
Not special education57%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female43%
Male25%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander27%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income33%
Not low income33%
Special education18%
Not special education36%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female83%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander64%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income64%
Not low income70%
Special education27%
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students58%
Female67%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander55%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income56%
Not low income60%
Special education46%
Not special education60%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 55% 60%
Hispanic 17% 20%
Two or more races 11% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 9% 7%
Black 6% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 14%N/A8%
Special education 119%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 258%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 61%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Martha Adams

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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380 NE Regatta Dr
Oak Harbor, WA 98277
Website: Click here
Phone: (360) 279-5153

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