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GreatSchools Rating

John Sedgwick Junior High School

Public | 7-9 | 779 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted October 11, 2013

Just happened to come across this website and decided to check out the reviews on my children's school. There are quite a few negative reviews that are a bit outdated. Here is a recent review to hang your hat on: We moved to Port Orchard in the middle of my son's 6th grade year at South Colby. We just moved from TX. He is on the smaller side for his age, and shy. The kind of kid that doesn't mind being left alone reading a book. In TX, he struggled with making friends, and was even bullied by some of the bigger kids. He blossomed at South Colby thanks to the friendly staff and students. In going to JSJH, he was nervous that he would be bullied by the 8th and 9th graders. Instead, he's become a social butterfly, and is stepping out of his comfort zone...in a good way. The classwork is challenging, but he's stepped up to meet that challenge and is striving for excellence, without us having to force it on him. My son plays football there as well, and the Coaches do a great job of encouraging the players and reminding them that they are students first. Overall, this is one of the best schools we have been a part of. Having served in the Navy, we have been to alot of them!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 10, 2011

I'm in the 8th grade at John Sedgwick, and I think this school is awesome. The only reason that people would complain is if they're the students are the ones that talk back to teachers, don't care enough to do their work or pay attention and really need to learn the meaning of respect. The teachers are amazing, and the classes are fun and challenging for me as a learner. Many people think this school is great, like my friend who goes to Cedar, is constantly bullied and the school refuses to do anything about it. Her mom and herself know that Sedgwick has no tolerance for bullying, so they are seriously considering switching schools. I would recemmend this school to anyone who wants to succeed amd learn and make friends.


Posted November 12, 2010

My kids attended Sedgwick for a little while until I pulled them out. It was a nightmare in all respects. The teachers are horrible, the kids come from families where they must not be taught any basic respect for humanity. I did not want my kids in this environment, thinking that it was okay.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2009

Oh, my gosh! This school is horrid! The STEP program is ludicris, and it makes no sense to abandon your students when they do not pay attention or goof off. The policy about fights is ridiculous, and I feel isolated and unimportant- I get this from both students AND staff. Is THIS the idea of 'Five star schools' that we want other schools to notice? I think not. Don't waste your time here- it's so not worth the $20 for P.E. clothes, let alone 180 days of your life.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 17, 2009

I hate this school. The STEP thing is so dumb, teachers don't thoroughly teach the lessons. I just started going to this school and it is the worst school I've been to in my life.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 5, 2009

Up to this point JSJH has been responsive and caring to the educational needs of our 8th grade son. Both academic and athletic departments have been 1st rate. Thank you staff and vols.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2009

The first semester is coming towards the end at Sedgwick. In the beginning of the year all the kids who came from Olalla grouped together, kids from Manchester grouped together, etc. Later, people started grouping together to make fun of others. The lunches are cool, sometimes there are activities and some picking on (the picking on is not cool). The teachers are awesome. Especially math. So right now I am having a good time at Sedgwick.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 28, 2008

Segwick Jr. High is the worst school I have had the unfortunate experience of working with. I have moved my family several times to schools across the country. The STEP program is a waste of time. Most students choose to be on steps 1 or 2 just so they do not have to pay attention in class. The teachers, overall, do not care about their students and just give out assignments without teaching. With rare few classes for academically inclined students, this school is one that I wish my daughter would not have attended. I suggest Marcus Whitman Jr. High, or any other school but Sedgwick.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2007

We've been disappointed with our experience in the last two years at Sedgwick. The academics have been unchallenging, grading criteria often structured in ways that do not capture the child's true efforts in the class, and most teachers do not use the ClassNotes.com tool consistently (making it difficult for parents to truly be active partners in the process). The school also seems to deal with frequent disciplinary issues that create ongoing disruptions in the classrooms. Administration is not immediately responsible to inquiries, and seem inconsistent and reactive in their application of policy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 2, 2007

I am about to go into the 8th grade at this school. For the most part it is a great school, the step program doesnt really do anything. The student body leaves some to be desired not a lot but a little.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 21, 2007

We have a son just finishing three years at this school and another just beginning there in the fall. Overall, we have been pretty happy with the school. The counseling office concept should be re-thought. The teachers overall are educated, committed to teaching, and well liked by the students. More teachers should be using the technology tools our tax dollars are paying for. Communication with busy families is right at the click of a button and most don't use the on-line web-based tools they've been provided. Overall, I would recommend this school though. Our first one through really enjoyed it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2005

My son is a special education student at this Jr. High. I have been actively involved with special education for years and I am absolutely delighted with the programs that he can participate in. He is actively participating in regular classrooms and enjoys going to school. (Even though he is non-verbal.) I also am actively involved with the Kitsap County Parent Coalition. They provide training and education (through PAVE) for understanding the IEP process. Knowing what can be provided and what you can do to help, will help your child and teacher communicate your child's progress. Remember, you are the Expert on your child, and this is one school that will listen!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2005

Their 504 program is a nightmare and the STEP program shouldn't be allowed. On the other hand, they have quite a few top-notch teachers, a very active group of parent volunteers, and the school is clean and well-cared for. Overall, given the slim resources and giant student population, they do strive for quality - except in a few spots. The student population, on the other hand, is rough-mouthed, naive, racist, homophobic, and has no idea what it takes to succeed in the world. But that's the fault of the parents, not the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2004

The STEP program is ridiculous. Follow up from administrators and teachers is laughable. I actually hand delivered notes to each teachers box that I wished to speak with, left 5 messages in an 8 day period to speak to my son's counselor and received no return call from counselor, one teacher called, one sent mail. Overall the entire organization seems completely chaotic, reminiscent of 'just who is running this asylum?' One teacher actually seemed totally okay with the fact that her class average grade was a 54%. Unbelievable. There are a couple of good ones (Ms. Matthews is one).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2004

Sedgwick Jr. High is lacking in quality leadership, this principal is not an on hands educator. As quoted to me by teachers 'the principals duties are solely administrative'. Additionally Sedgewick fails to meet the needs of many special education students ie: lack of quality tutors, lack in quantity of tutors. Sedgwicks policy on discipline is counter productive, they have no problem removing special education students who are failing from the classroom for the smallest of infractions placing them in a room for hours causing the kids to miss other required courses. Many times they fail to contact a parent or relative to inform them of these actions. I have found that admistrators at Sedgwick act worse than the children we pay them to educate, many disagreements between teacher/student boil down to personality conflicts or the fact the teacher is simply having a bad day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2004

Academically I think Sedgwick is a good school. They have a nice variety of classes to choose from and I like the 7th graders program in which they kind of get to 'sample' future class choices throughout the year. They don't get a choice as to which ones they are and actually I've liked that because they have had to take classes that they normally wouldn't have chosen (drama, cooking, art, languages) and have even liked some of them. The principal is doing a great job and it's easy to get to know him as his presence is seen at functions all the time. Volunteers are made to feel very welcome at the school and the coordinator is always on top of things. One thing they have there that I don't care for is the 'Make your day' program. Students and teachers give or take points based on whether they stayed on task, got their work done etc. If they don't 'make their day' they can get a phone call home or have to talk to a councelor etc. They spend too much time on this and I don't think it's very effective. All in all it's a good school and I'm glad my kids go/went there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2004

This school is one of the first to implement the new 2008 graduation requirements. The staff at Sedgwick work as a team incoorperating the opinions of parent's, student's and the community.


Posted November 21, 2003

It's not a very good school. I like the mojority of my teachers, but...there is way to much prejudice and stereotyping going on from the students and some teachers. And that is NOT cool. It really effects the educational well-being and the secure atmosphere that should be there. Makes a lot of students self conscious and makes them feel the need to change themselves. Not good, not good at all.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

232 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

232 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

229 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students65%
Female65%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic53%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income58%
Not low income68%
Special education14%
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female78%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income61%
Not low income77%
Special education32%
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students72%
Female81%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic63%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income66%
Not low income74%
Special education41%
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female66%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic57%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income59%
Not low income66%
Special education22%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female78%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic57%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Low income61%
Not low income71%
Special education33%
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students71%
Female72%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income67%
Not low income72%
Special education48%
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
99%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

159 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
84%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students98%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students76%
Female77%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic77%
Multiracial82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income71%
Not low income78%
Special education40%
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 75% 63%
Hispanic 10% 18%
Two or more races 10% 5%
Asian 2% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 118%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 21%N/A8%
Special education 214%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 73%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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8995 SE Sedgwick Rd
Port Orchard, WA 98366
Phone: (360) 876-7376

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