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GreatSchools Rating

Salmon Bay School

Public | K-8 | 119 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted yesterday

My kids love this school. They have developed an amazing love of learning at Salmon Bay. They are challenged to think critically, to think outside the box, and to be able to present their ideas in a multitude of formats. That is the kind of education I want for my kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The description on the school website about this school is how the school wants to be seen, not how it is. This school has great pe, music and art (which is parent funded so it could dry up) but it stops there. There is a long history the predates our child's attendance where teachers avoid parents, don't proactively reach out to parents and raise academic concerns or check homework. Parents can go a whole year and have no knowledge of issues until the state test and teacher report cards aren't congruent with state assessment results. Many parents pay for outside tutoring and other mitigation. Against Parent's wishes, Elementary parent teacher conferences are young kids doing ineffective presentations and real concerns don't get discussed. A handful of behavior problem kids impact the ecology of the K-5 school and Admin has ignored bathroom safety problem. It gets worse as you go up each floor of a 3 story building and you should insist that your child go to the bathroom in twos or threes. 5+ key support staff left and a few teachers as well have left. There is a definite elite parent group that gets better access to staff and resources.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2014

There are positive aspects of this school. They strive to create "whole" child learning. Lots of field trips, camp ect but there is a yearly fee to cover these. The parent group raises money that does/have paid for partial salary of staff..only works if parents continue to pay. If your child is advanced or has challenges services poor and teachers do not support integrated classrooms. If your child doesn't qualify for special service, run from this school. No tutors, no differentiation in classroom, Admin talk a good game but no follow thru. During short time here, we know of 7 kids and their families that have felt driven out because their child didn't fit into the average mold.The building is run down, the bathrooms are inexcusable, the building doesn't even meet minimum earthquake safety let alone recommended. There is a growing discontent between new admin and teachers. New principal is not available and does not respond to any emails, does not answer phone, guarded by admin staff unless you are the "in" group. Some parents have never seen principal despite picking their kids up everyday.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2013

A new principal and vice principal are working hard to make positive changes. Elementary: Works best for self motivated learners who enjoy project based learning and varied routines as even K-1 leave the classroom up to 3 to 5 times a day for a variety of activities.(pro for 1 of ours) It can be difficult for students that need routine and memorization to learn well. Few/poor resources for struggling or advanced students.(con for 1 of ours) What we have found is that the primary grades are focused strongly on developing social skills and community. There is PE everyday, library and art once a week, music(instrumental and vocal), drama, dance, 4 to 5+ parent driven field trips to enhance academics and yearly camping trips even for the littlest ones. Science and social studies are strong. The project based science programs are impressive. Reading is average. Math and writing are weak though effort is being made to improve these areas (as is most grades still fall above or around average for state). Impressive given the amount of time focused on developing the whole student which can not be evaluated by tests and overall seems successful. Improving every year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2013

Wow. Reading thru these reviews is interesting, especially the ones regarding non-inclusion. They are seeing something else entirely. I find this school amazing. While the diversity is average for a north-end school (give current neighborhood districting) with Asians predominant and a lower rates of African Americans and middle-eastern kids. The teachers work their butts off providing extras such as the winter enrichment program, fall and spring camp, dances, and field trips. Lots of hands on activities in science and social studies - inclusion and the school as a joint learning community are emphasized. Very active, supportive, and helpful parent group - ask any teacher and they will say they could not do it with out this support. Good test scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2012

Salmon Bay School has high academic expectation but enhances this with art, drama, music, and everyday PE. Students and teachers respect each other (everyone at the school calls each other by first names-- even the principal). Kids are taught to work out differences. Families are expected to be involved in the school. It is a good place and the faculty work hard and really care. It is also a K-8 and I like the smaller middle school experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 6, 2011

I went to pub school in Seattle & was hoping this would be a step up. Unfortunately, I found my experiences are very similar save for the overly rude, disrespectful behavior displayed by kids, parents & teachers. In 3 yrs I've seen kids use teachers 1st names, parents are more interested in social hour than education & the school draws wealthier people than most. We've had a very difficult time with the kids (bullying that has NEVER been adressed other than to say my son is "too sensitive") & their parents (very uninclusive & more interested in status). It's been said there's a lot of parent involvement but it's the same parents who volunteer - many do nothing. There are very few black people & I've heard statements of "those people" & use of the "N" word. When mentioned, I was told to go to a south end school?!? Average parent age is 45yo & they have a tendency to treat younger parents badly. The best thing I can say - the P.E teacher is awesome but he pushes them really hard (mile runs for kinders). There is a yearly fee, but I guess it isn't considered tuition as funds are for field trips. If you're looking for inclusion, diversity & a modicum of respect, look elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2010

This school had the diversity of a box of saltine crackers, and none of the taste. Not kind, not inclusive, not even safe.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2009

Salmon Bay School is a wonderful learning community, where students are encouraged to reflect on their studies and think about how they relate to their communities and world at large. The administration and the teachers encourage experiential and service learning, and incorporate these into students' required subjects. My organization, Bridges to Understanding, has conducted Digital Storytelling programs at Salmon Bay for several years, and I and my colleagues are consistently impressed at the quality education happening at Salmon Bay.


Posted March 6, 2009

My 2 boys attend the middle school program at Salmon Bay, and I love it. My son with a learning disability is integrated into the classroom and the teachers put forth so much effort into seeing that he excels to the level of expectations we set for him in his learning plan. He has higher self-esteem and a greater love of learning than at any other time in his education. My other son, who is very bright, is also challenged to produce his best effort and is blossoming under the rigorous curriculum. The teachers expect a lot, but they are so caring and understanding. They make sure the students have all of the tools and support they could possibly need to succeed. They communicate wonderfully with parents and make perfect teammates for parents striving to help their children have the best education within an inspiring environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2009

I am a student and like salmon bay. Theres is homework so you do learn stuff. Its light on homework compared to other schools but thats a good thing. You dont hear kids complaining. Parents you need to let up. This school racks. Your not going there your kids are. Back off.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 18, 2008

i attended salmon bay K-8, i am a 8th grader now and i couldn't be happier, this school is everything a kid wants. you feel comfortable and confident. some parents don't like the school because its structure, but all the students will tell you they understand their role in the school and are being pushed to achieve. i am not in highschool yet but i feel more than prepared
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 13, 2008

Principal shows distinct lack of organization and, sadly, minimal interest in students; vice principal is amazing, however! Super teachers, lots of parental involvement, and a palpable sense that the students care about each other make it a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2008

I'm a current (new) student at Salmon Bay. I've attended for seven days, an already observed that this school has an extremely long wait list, almost no new students, ect. It's so highly desired but I don't know why. It's a somewhat unique school in the way of extracurricular activities, but otherwise, it is completely normal. Nothing special.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 17, 2007

I attended Salmon Bay through two buildings, three names, four principals and grades K-8. I went to traditional highschool, and transferred to Nova this year. If your expectations are so high that even Salmon Bay's academics are shoddy, homeschooling is ideal. Another Salmon Bay alumna and I were apparently the only students to find the district-mandated highschool curriculum painfully redundant. When asked how high school compared, I replied with complete sincerity, 'I miss learning.' This was especially true where math was concerned. I learned everything from my 10th-grade biology class four years earlier. I'm having trouble grasping special-ed students being 'scary', because they're mostly Apsergers, i.e., generally uncommunicative. Once a boy threw a desk. He took math independently therehence. If they weren't integrated with 'regular classrooms' I wouldn't have my best friend, who, by-the-way, was neither a major distraction nor did he have daily breakdowns, or, in fact, breakdowns at all.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 21, 2007

This school is committed to social justice and academic excellence. They work to make students into their own individuals and be part of the larger community. Community building is one of the most highly regarded ideals here, reflecting what is most needed in this world we live in. The staff are so dedicated many spend weekends and late evenings working hard to make this school the best.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted February 21, 2007

Academic expectations are very low. They have a full period for home room every day for the entire year, but only get 1/2 year of science (Most schools have full year science for 6th grade). No history or world culture curriculum to speak of. Special Ed. students are integrated into regular classrooms...seems lovely, but they cause major distractions, and have daily breakdowns. No progress, and the behavior is so bad, the teacher can not teach. All I can say is don't do it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2007

This school has a lot of isssues, beginning with poor leadership. Many children at this school have behavior issues, are disrespectful and rude. They treat each other rude and they treat the teachers disrespectully. Academics are poor. Very poor. My son is very bright (tested into spectrum), but needs tutoring just to keep him at grade level, because expectations are so low. School told us he would get 30 minutes to an hour of homework per nigh, but he hasn't had homework in months.If you have an ADD child or kids with special issues try this school, but otherwise look elsewhere. It's not pretty.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2007

This school has been a nightmare. There has been a change in Principal and Vice Principal and the school is going down hill. Academics are weak. Communication is very very poor. Teachers are OK, none really great. There are a lot of children with behavior problems and it can be scary at times. Our bus is always late, making my sons bus ride an hour and half each way! Playdates don't happen much, because the school is all city draw and kids live all over the city. No neighborhood feel at all. We are pulling our child out mid year, it's that bad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2006

I attended Salmon Bay from th grade through 8th grade and am now a Sophomore at Lakeside School. Salmon Bay was a wonderful experience and the rigorous academics prepared me for excellent and challenging course work at Lakeside. Everyone said freshman year at a school like Lakeside would be extremely difficult, but I believe that the teaching I received at Salmon Bay more than prepared me for it. All of the teachers (when I was there, 2002-2005) were of the highest caliber. I recommend Salmon Bay.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
38%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
79%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
70%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

119 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students83%
Female77%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low incomen/a
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female91%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low incomen/a
Not low income80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female80%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low incomen/a
Not low income73%
Special education36%
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female100%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low incomen/a
Not low income95%
Special education91%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students75%
Female84%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low incomen/a
Not low income75%
Special education64%
Not special education78%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female72%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low incomen/a
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female93%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students96%
Female97%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students69%
Female74%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic55%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income57%
Not low income71%
Special education53%
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female91%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income79%
Not low income88%
Special education74%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students62%
Female66%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income52%
Not low income65%
Special education36%
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female78%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income44%
Not low income76%
Special education39%
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students74%
Female81%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income52%
Not low income80%
Special education46%
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students62%
Female74%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income37%
Not low income67%
Special education20%
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female86%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income63%
Not low income80%
Special education40%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students84%
Female86%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income74%
Not low income86%
Special education63%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
89%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students83%
Female85%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White83%
Low incomen/a
Not low income81%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 79% 60%
Hispanic 7% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 7%
Two or more races 5% 6%
Black 3% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 119%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 213%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 64%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Visual arts
  • Architecture

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Architecture
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Jodee Reed

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Softball
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Architecture
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1810 NW 65 St
Seattle, WA 98117
Phone: (206) 252-1720

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