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GreatSchools Rating

Franklin-Pierce High School

Public | 9-12 | 1132 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted November 29, 2013

I have gone so far as to get an exception for my children to goto Franklin Pierce. Both my girls love their school, are active in sports and are honor students in a couple AP classes that are difficult enough to actually make them study. My oldest is going into running start this next year because of teacher support and curriculum available to give students the tools todo so. Thank you FP, GO Cardinals!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

okay first off i am current FPHS Cardinal and proud to be one. when i looked at all the reviews it really brought me down because they were all negative. FPHS is a great wonderful school, it has great educations and high test scores. the teachers are great and connect well with the students. the school programs like S.A.D.D (students against destructive descision) and Leadership are real fun and i suggest studnets to try them out. also our school is a very sporty kind of school. people show up to every game and join the Scream Team ( a team that screams motivation cheers like " we have spirit yes we do we have spirit how about you.") we also have a great school band and choir. im not sure about quire since im not in it but i cant tell you about the band. the band plays at every home game. we consist of flutes, clarinets, saxphones both alto and bass, trumbets, trombones, tubas, french horn and percussion. its a grreat program its fun and i highly suggest it. FPHS is a overall a great school for your child, im sorry if this comment was a waste of time. so anyways thankyou for suggest FPHS the home of the Cardinals
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 20, 2012

When I attended F.P. ( class of 79 ) it was a better institution than it is today . The instructors with very few exceptions where professionals and behaved in a manner that demonstrated it . I have now been witness to the substandard habits of immature teachers who belittle and ridicule some students while they groom and care for their favorites. I am certain that there are still some stalwart professionals that attempt to ply their profession in this school , but with the current curriculum that is dictated to them I fear that that they will not be able to succeed. All the wile there are those who would further degrade their chosen profession by trying to deceive and mislead both student and parent so as to conceal their own inept behavior and moral shortcomings. As both a parent and a grandfather to students in this district I am appalled and infuriated with some of the administration and faculty who are no better than swine gorging themselves at the trough .


Posted March 5, 2010

I graduated in 2007, and went to franklin pierce all 4 years of my high school career. I recommend it over any other school, because it offers great culture, and all of my classmates whom went to college immediately after graduating are very well rounded. There is indeed a problem with students being able to skip class when and where ever they possibly can, because there is a lack of security guards or faculty patrolling the ground while classes are in session. It's a big sports school, when I was a student, all of our sports teams excelled to state championships, there's plenty of school spirit, and for a public high school, Franklin Pierce is the best you can hope for in that area. All other surrounding schools have high crime incidens, low testing scores, and disciplinary problems. I would recommend FP highly.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 27, 2008

I have a son in special ed and the spec. ed department is great but there has always been a lack of tolerence from a lot of the general ed staff and students. My son is legally blind and they no remenial classes or in school teacher assistant slots reserved for these kids. I feel they would benefit fcrom the general ed student exposure! Maybe it is due to the lack of dicipline and accountabilty for students, thus fearing the sp. ed students safety????
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 15, 2008

The school does not take any action with student disipline...they worry too much about distractions like hats or cell phones but when a student is in need of dicipline they dont do anything about it....I'm a living example of that and thats why i'm not going back to Franklin Pierce. Don't get me wrong I love the school, the teachers, my friends, but the dicipline needs to increase in certain areas, because now I feel unimportant and that's taking me away from all the things I love at Franklin Pierce.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 28, 2008

the school has certainly seen better days. the teachers are not to blame for the students lack of discipline at home -- there has been a fall of lack of respect for one another, as well for teachers. FPHS has aonderful business program, and medical program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2007

My husband and I grew up in this district and are saddened by the fact that our schools have deteriorated rather than advanced. I think either it's time parents, teachers and the district kick into making this school a place to succeed or watch as parents like myself remove their child from this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2007

I think that there are parents that have very little knowledge regarding programs offered at FP. Franklin Pierce has one of the most respected Choir teachers in the area. Futhermore, it offers Medical Rotation, a program which students come from all over the county to attend. Millions of dollars have been spent in the past few years to upgrade the sporting facilities, as well as creating a central meeting area and bathrooms in order to create more supervision and minimize fights. While some teachers may be mediocre, there are several that I distinctly remember as great contributors to my success in college. The science teachers there are exceptional.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 16, 2007

I am currently a student at FpHs and I think the parent involement is very poor. franklin pierce is not a bad school it just needs a little work. and i do not like the time periods either. but other than that it is a pretty good school
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 9, 2006

I have a child who has been at FP for 3 years. The students like the school. I, however, believe the teachers are unexperienced and below par. There are also concerns about fights. If you want to know how the kids do there, you should obtain a copy of their newsletter from (I believe) Summer 2006. It tells you the percentage of kids that actually passed their classes. I do not believe the principal is pro-active. I believe the school tries to minimize the number of fights, although this year fights do not seem as regular. Lastly, the school is very crowded. I really thought I liked this school district because I thought the teachers in the middle school and elementary school were fabulous. Very disappointed with the high school level.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2006

My daughter likes the school, staff, students, and sports activities, but that's a teenager's views. Parent and community involvement is lacking, with dismal turnout for girls sporting events (even most parents don't bother, what a shame). This is an old facility that could use some upgrades in the academic areas.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2006

Most of the teachers there actually care for the students and want them to excell in all they do. Others are just there to get their pay checks.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 7, 2006

The academic programs were just mediocre. I felt like the activities available were limited & the parent involvement was lacking. There wasn't much school spirit & most people don't even know the school exists!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 1, 2005

I am currently a student at FPHS. I have to admit,at first I did not expect it to be that great. However,once I went to school, I liked it. My peers, and most of the teachers are nice and make you feel safe. I would recommend Franklin Pierce High School over any other school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 17, 2004

i am currently enrolled at FPHS. i went to WHS the last two years, but i took a summer school class to get ahead in some credits at FP. after attending FP for summer school and meeting some of the FP teachers, i felt like i would be better off going to FP then Washington High School. i enjoy the kids here way more and i feel that the learning environment is a lot better quality also. the teachers are great and block scheduling has been a nice change. the only thing that i dont like about the school is the portfolio and all the requirements with it. we already have enough things that are required to graduate... all we need is another thing to hold us back.. i understand it is to help us succeed, but i think we would do just as well without it. thank you.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 26, 2004

This was the perfect choice for my kids. FPHS has a wonderful staff and student body who work together as a whole. My children's teachers encourage them to be themselves and strive for excellence. The students are courteous and respectful to one another and to the faculty. This reflects upon the kind of teaching that goes on at this school. One of my children is in Special Education and her counselor and teachers work together with her to make sure she is benefiting from her classes,and is able to achieve success. I recommend this school to any parent. My children will be attending for 2 and 4 more years and I wouldn't send them anywhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2004

This school is very safe, and involved. They have high standards, and are well known in the community. It's one of the most diverse schools in our area, there is no minority or majority, it's pretty well balanced. It's a great public school full of many different people.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 13, 2004

I am a grad of the class of 2002 and I just have a few words about FPHS. It is a great school with loving teachers who really care what goes on with the students. One in particular is Mr. Tom Oldoski. He made my high school experience a wonderful and meaningful time. I would just like to say that FPHS is one of the best schools around. Thank you all.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 17, 2004

franklin pierce is an awesome school. the kids have a great time going there. teachers make it a fun and safe place to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
37%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
72%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
16%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

176 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
61%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
34%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
6%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
19%

2011

 
 
17%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students59%
Female62%
Male56%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander67%
Hispanic48%
Multiracial46%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income51%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students95%
Female91%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
White96%
Low income93%
Not low income97%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Female40%
Male30%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White38%
Low income26%
Not low income45%
Special education14%
Not special education38%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students68%
Female65%
Male71%
Black53%
Asian57%
Asian/Pacific Islander65%
Hispanic64%
Multiracial71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income65%
Not low income73%
Special education64%
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students69%
Female65%
Male73%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income64%
Not low income76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students9%
Female7%
Male11%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White15%
Low income10%
Not low income9%
Special educationn/a
Not special education7%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students39%
Female40%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income33%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education36%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

291 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
41%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

264 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

250 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

262 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students92%
Female93%
Male91%
Black85%
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander89%
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income89%
Not low income96%
Special education46%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students94%
Female99%
Male91%
Black93%
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanic94%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income92%
Not low income97%
Special education67%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 57% 60%
Hispanic 15% 20%
Black 12% 5%
Two or more races 7% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 256%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 54%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
College counselor(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Industrial shop
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Design
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Jennifer Shaw

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Industrial shop
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Learning lab
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Power lifting / Weight lifting
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball
  • Wrestling

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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11002 18th Ave East
Tacoma, WA 98445
Phone: (253) 298-3800

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