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GreatSchools Rating

Evergreen Internet Academy

Public | 6-12 | 600 students

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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6 reviews of this school


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Posted April 18, 2014

Waste of time for any student. My student lost a whole quarter because there were no teachers to help. Only time they were there was to tell you that your student was flunking! Find any alternative school just not this one! They don't even deserve ONE STAR!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2014

Worst of the worst. Registered in November due to med emergency issues. On a local level, the staff failed to move my child from approved to active even though I was inquiring daily by phone and email. I finally sent emails to all teachers and a higher up explaining the problem and made a fed up phone call to a higher up. The last class finally loaded on December 16. There has been nothing but problems with the laptop they sent us. They won't take back this piece of garbage for a functional computer. We have spent hours on the phone with numerous techs and gone through multiple logmein123.com attempts to fix the ongoing issues. To date, my daughter has gone from an honor roll student in public school and a teachers favorite, to flunking due to unreasonable circumstances. If you are considering this option, I suggest you look elsewhere. We will be withdrawing and enrolling our high achiever where she has a fair chance to reach her former status with competent equipment and staff that return calls and complete their jobs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2013

Positive: 1. Some of the teachers are really fantastic...flexible and willing to do all they can to help our child succeed. 2. The curriculum is preparing our child for academic success (i.e. college). 3. Our child is learning and retaining new information. 4. Exams are from home, so if your child has test-anxiety, it's the perfect recipe for success. 5. The academic advisers are terrific. Challenges: College Prep: This is a college prep school with curriculum that's demanding, time-consuming, and rigid. Time: Our children were working on assignments most Saturdays, and a full eight hour day Monday through Friday. Holidays at IQ Academy are for teachers, not students, because most teachers leave the full-week assignments in place, as though the students are attending a full week, even though it might be a two-day holiday. Teachers: Our experience has been that 4 out of 6 teachers are willing to work with our child to help them succeed (we wish it was 100%). Our recommendation: If your child is highly intelligent, learns well through reading and note-taking, and very self-motivated, then IQ Academy might be right for them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2011

I attended IQ Academy for a majority of the school year and went from being an honor roll student to flunking. Cons: The teachers are never online to help you, the classes move WAY to fast, and there is little to no interaction with your fellow students. Pros: Many classes to choose from, flexibility for students, and parents are able to look at grades and attendance. It's your choice, but I do NOT recommend this school to anyone.


Posted January 17, 2010

I really like this school, you can pick any class you want. Also, you can do these special classes with you teacher online! It's really fun and you can meet friends there too.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 8, 2007

The Evergreen Internet Academy is an outstanding asset to the Evergreen School District, it offers choices most can only hope for; when a child wants to take an extra course or make up for time lost, the child can start as late as the instructor allows. My child started a class over Christmas break and finished up in half the time as an ordinary class. It's Building and public computers are connected to the Homelink Academy Building where teachers and other student practice all subjects in case your child is Homeschooled. The Academy is centrally located in the district and easily accessable via public transportation as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
19%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
33%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
21%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
34%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
14%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
15%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
35%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
23%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students16%
Female8%
Male23%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White24%
Low income10%
Not low income22%
Special educationn/a
Not special education13%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female65%
Male48%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income41%
Not low income71%
Special educationn/a
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students20%
Female7%
Male32%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White26%
Low income13%
Not low income23%
Special educationn/a
Not special education22%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students48%
Female54%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Low income44%
Not low income50%
Special educationn/a
Not special education51%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students45%
Female54%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income41%
Not low income46%
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students17%
Female23%
Male10%
Black7%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White24%
Low income16%
Not low income18%
Special educationn/a
Not special education18%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Female56%
Male53%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income37%
Not low income62%
Special educationn/a
Not special education55%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students45%
Female49%
Male40%
Black7%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low income37%
Not low income48%
Special educationn/a
Not special education46%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
62%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
5%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
52%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
30%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students29%
Female21%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low incomen/a
Not low income36%
Special educationn/a
Not special education24%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students66%
Female71%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low incomen/a
Not low income75%
Special educationn/a
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students26%
Female30%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Low incomen/a
Not low income31%
Special educationn/a
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students37%
Femalen/a
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Low incomen/a
Not low income37%
Special educationn/a
Not special education38%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students8%
Female10%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education9%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

34 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
12%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
52%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

26 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
21%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students61%
Female69%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low incomen/a
Not low income67%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students59%
Female69%
Male44%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low incomen/a
Not low income63%
Special educationn/a
Not special education63%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 60%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Black 4% 5%
Two or more races 4% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 12%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 213%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school Brick and Mortar Public School
Homeschool
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 15N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 8N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 72%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Clubs
  • Science club

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
Media arts
  • Technical design and production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Japanese
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Clubs
  • Foreign language and culture club
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Julie Tumulty
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Part-time study
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Aventa curriculum by K12
  • Virtual school
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • None
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Japanese
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • None

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Mentoring
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • None
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
Media arts
  • Technical design and production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Book/reading club
  • Foreign language and culture club
  • Science club
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend local events
  • Attend parent nights
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Brick and Mortar Public School
Homeschool

Planning ahead

College preparation / awareness offered
None
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

13501 NE 28th St
Vancouver, WA 98682
Website: Click here
Phone: (888) 899-4792

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