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GreatSchools Rating

Dixon Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 650 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted January 9, 2014

I worked at Dixon. My experience was so horrific that I still have anxiety about it. The administration at this school are some of the most mean-spirited people I've ever met. I never felt supported by them - in fact, at times, I actively felt like they were out to get me or trying to catch me doing something wrong so that they could yell at me. The students are made to walk in perfectly straight, quiet, lines all day - which, in my opinion, is a totally unrealistic expectation for middle schoolers. This hyper-sensitivity about noise in the hallways contributed to students acting out in the classroom for the mere fact that they had no other outlet. The system of discipline at Dixon is dysfunctional at best - it does not benefit or support the students in learning proper behavior and it frustrates and undermines teachers - making their jobs ten times harder. I was never happier than the day I walked out of Dixon Elementary for the last time and saw the place disappear in my rearview mirror for good. I found this school to be a TOXIC working and learning environment - certainly not a place I would send my children or recommend to others.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 6, 2013

I have to agree with the parents on this one. I have had encounters with the office staff and the principal and they are all very rude and unprofessional. I recently went to a parent meeting and the teachers were unprofessional and dry. If they look like this all day no wonder kids aren't interested in school. Based on my personal interactions, I really would like for my children to attend somewhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2012

I worked at Dixon many years ago, and I found it was a very good school. I guess everyone has a different experience. Granted I can only speak for when I worked there more then 11yrs. ago.. Maybe times have really changed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2010

Principal micro manages and discourages the freedom and creativity of teachers and staff. it would be nice if they kept the staff and faculty but improved upon the principal
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2010

I find the office staff to be very rude. The other staff members are very uncooperative in communicating with the parents and helping provide help for the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2009

I really love this school for my son. The disciplinary action that the staff takes is so needed for these children with different types of nonparenting backgrounds. Another thing I love is when the children walk through the hall and don't speak, the staff makes them speak and have eye contact. There are also so many activities for the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2008

Dixon school provides my child with a principal & teachers who set high expectations; with numerous activities which enhance learning & social skills. The parents are also encouraged to get & stay involved. I am proud to say that my son (a First Grader) attends Dixon elementary.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2008

Dixon has provided my son, who is in Kindergarden, a safe environment that is conducive to learning. My family loves Dixon and their pricipal, who is always 'on it'!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2008

My son is a freshman now and he was in Dixon from first grade to eight grade. I love Dixon because they are strict and to me they care about the childrens education and well being.My son did not like the principle because she was strict on them and I like that. My daughter will be starting third grade at Dixon in the fall. The school that she is in now is horrible. They do not have art,music,sports,computer, or anything for them to do. I thank God for my child getting accepted into Dixon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2007

My children are currently a student at Dixon and she really enjoys going to school.Dixon school is well organized and really have teachers who care about there students.My youngest daughter is in the 5th grade and she comes home with good grades because she says she has teachers who are fun.My oldest daughter is in the eightth grade and says all her teachers are cool and explains stuuf very good.Overall Dixon is a wonderful school they have music art and physcial education once a week.The staff is wonderful and I think dixon is just wonderful
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2007

My daughter is a new transfer student from North Carolina and is having a terrible time adjusting at Dixon. The staff is very unprofessional in that whenever I come visit, they always have negative comments about her and seem to believe that she brings drama upon herself instead of considering that she is from a multicultural environment where children werent disrespectful and the staff truly cared. My daughter doesnt even like to go the counselor in fear that she will get yelled at! I remember one particular time I was in the office and the staff including the counselor were loud and making negative comments with me and my child standing there instead of taking the matter behind closed doors. Overall they are just unprofessional and If I cant get my child into a better school next year, I will send her back down South with my parents,where people really care!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2006

As a parent of a student at Dixon, I am not very happy with the school this year. I don't feel the administration is very concerned with teaching the students. I think they are more concerned with finding out about trivial things, like what is going on with the parents. Whenever I try and talk with someone all I get is I don't have time for this. If as a parent I can't talk to someone when I need to then what good are they? There is no professionalism there and I don't ge the sense they care about the students at all. I am seriously considering transferring my child. Luckily she only has one more year. I don't like the fact that I can't check on my child when I get ready, what I get is they don't want to interrupt the student. Bull!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 18, 2005

I am a former student of Dixon and am sending my child there. The faculty are outstanding and they offer so much more than regular schools. I know my child is receiving a quality education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2005

I recently had the chance to work in Dixon as an intern and I must say as a future educator having worked in the Chicago Public School system that Dixon is one of the best schools overall. The principal has only one factor in mind when making decision and that is the students. The quality of the academics are well above those of other schools I have observed. They offer extracurricular activities that I did not receive in high school. Now, I may not be a teacher at Dixon nor a parent of a student at Dixon but, if I had a choose of what school would be the best fit for myself as an educator or my children as students, it would be Dixon.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 30, 2004

As a parent of two Dixon students I must say I totally disagree with the statement of the other two parents. I have had two children to attend Dixon and I found the teachers and the principals to be very supportive of the students and the parents. I have also noticed that neither the teachers nor the principals have the tolerance for direspectful, disruptive, and unruly parents or students. My children have been nurtured and supported by both the teachers and principals at Dixon. Education is valuable to some parents. If Dixon was such a lousy school why did you keep your children there?? Dixon teachers and principals provide both a nurturing yet disciplined environment for all students. Sorry the other parents don't think so.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2004

As I read the two negative comments from the parents about Dixon School, I realized that often parents do not want to be held accountable for their children. Yes, as a parent you are supposed to teach your children, after all, we only see them for approximately six and a half hours I believe they are with you the other 17.5 hours. I often wonder do parents think teachers are supermen and women. In an average day we may see 90-130 students. How can we possibly call or contact all of the students who did not turn in their homework etc. Wouldn't it be easier for the parents to call the teacher and leave a message regarding their child's grades or behavior if they are concerned? Of course not after all the teachers and Principals are always the scapegoat for everthing. If the students weren't unruly, discipling wouldn't be an option.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 29, 2004

Dixon is a well-rounded school that strives to set an environment of pride, academic excellence, good citizenship and cultural awareness. Many parents are not accustomed to this within inner-city schools with a 100% African American population. The school's zero tolerance policy is one designed to benefit the children in terms of their safety, their understanding of community/city-wide rules and laws and to teach accountability. All learning and discipline should start in a child's home. Teachers cannot effectively teach if children aren't following rules and in order. Parents must reinforce this at home. Unfortunately, those parents and children who cannot adjust or comform tend to tranfer out. However, there are rules and expectations at all schools. Dixon cares deply for all of it's children but parents don't always see teachers staying late, working at home, spending their own money and making tons of other sacrifices for other people's Education is no joke!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 6, 2004

I totally agree with the previous parent. Dixon is a big fat joke. The only thing the principal is concerned about is how many seminars she can sponsor and how much news coverage she gets. Some of the the teachers are good. The other parent is correct in saying you are not notified of anything that's going on with your child. My child has been in Dixon since kindergarten. They are so quick to try and discipline. They really should focus more on education. The principal wants to take credit for the scores the kids are receiving. Most of the kids at Dixon come from homes where the parents are educated and the parents are doing the teaching. Look at the transfer rate of kids coming in seventh grade from Perry. Half of those kids don't stay for eighth grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2004

I as a parent of two children who attend Dixon school one who recently graudated, feel that Dixon school is a big fat joke. The staff, the teachers, and the principal they could care less about the students they just care about the schools image. They say they have computers and resources for the children to use but if you ask the children about it they can tell you that they get on the computer about 2 or 3 times a year if that many. The children may recieve failing grades and most of the time the parent won't be notified. God forbid your child is in the upper grades they won't care they will talk to him/her any kind of way. Don't take my word talk to the children and some of the neighborhood parents. Dixon School is a big joke!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
58%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students40%
Female46%
Male31%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities44%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female56%
Male46%
Black51%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities58%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female83%
Male90%
Black85%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female83%
Male90%
Black85%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female97%
Male100%
Black98%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income98%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female65%
Male56%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income57%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students48%
Female52%
Male45%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities54%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students55%
Female65%
Male46%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female68%
Male46%
Black55%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female74%
Male71%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income71%
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities77%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female65%
Male58%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Not low income79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students83%
Female82%
Male85%
Black83%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income81%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female60%
Male58%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income58%
Not low income63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female67%
Male56%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income61%
Not low income69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 99% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 24%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Music teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Jazz band
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Sharon Ann Dale

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Music room
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Jazz band
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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8306 South Saint Lawrence Avenue
Chicago, IL 60619
Phone: (773) 535-3834

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