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GreatSchools Rating

Agassiz Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 388 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted April 8, 2014

Agassiz has been a wonderful neighborhood school for our child who is in Kindergarten. It's truly a hidden gem in CPS. The parent involvement is fantastic. The principle and teachers are professional, supportive and commitment to see all the students shine at Agassiz. We have been very happy with the school and teachers. Highlights include small class size, excellent Arabic foreign language classes, rigorous academic standards, after-school programs and as our neighborhood school we cherish the opportunity to walk our child to school every day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2014

My son has had an IEP since entering Agassiz as a Kindergartener. The staff has been diligent in communicating my sons strengths and weaknesses in the classroom and working with us to create goals. In the course of a week, he works with an occupational therapist for fine motor skills, a speech pathologist, in class assistant (for the regular classroom), and his special ed teacher (daily) in a more restrictive environment. My son has attention issues and a processing disorder which affects his ability to read, write and organize. I could not be happier in the results we are achieving as a team.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2014

Excellent school with fine teachers and administrative staff. Principal is professional and not too chatty; that shows she wants to get her job done and not waste too much precious time on unimportant "chatty" issues. Parents should all appreciate that quality.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 26, 2014

I was very unhappy with the administration of this school. I felt the principal was very unprofessional when she was faced with a problem. I couldn't be in a school with a principal like this and transferred out. I didn't realize how bad the school was until I went somewhere else and my son and I were treated well and with respect. However, I do want to say that the teachers there are very good so if you attend, and don't have any issues where the principal could be involved, you'll probably be fine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2013

My grandson attends Agassiz, and while it is one half hour to 45 minute commute, his parents feel the drive is well worth it. The class size is small enough to give individuals the attention he/she might need, yet large enough for a very diversified class. I was amazed at the homework he had as a kindergartner, but it has laid a very strong foundation for him. He now has the discipline to be successful in his educational path.


Posted August 2, 2013

We have been thrilled with our experience at Agassiz Elementary! The teachers are wonderful, the students are engaged and happy, and the focus on the Arts and languages is fantastic for our inquisitive 6-yr-old. The staff and parent organizations are truly exceptional; can't say enough about Agassiz!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2013

This school is wonderful! It was great seeing all of the students cheering Agassiz's name today as they celebrated it's 100 year birthday. The staff are kind and very dedicated, administration is very helpful, and the parents are very involved. There are a wide range of in school and after school clubs that students can be a part of.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2013

I'm a Student at Agassiz Elementry School and I think that the Upper Grade(6-8) Staff is wonderful pointing out the wonderful Reading/History Teacher(room 306), Math Teacher (room 304), and Writing/Science teacher(room 305). Agassiz is very diverse and I have alot of intersting and fun things to do that wil keep students on track w/ schoolwork and student connection which helps the students flow. Agassiz could really improve with Admin. Staff involvement and respect for the children. Admin. Staff could listen to more of the students and not just their fav. 4 students.


Posted February 21, 2013

My children both attend Agassiz and we feel very lucky to have Agassiz as our neighborhood school. I have a lot of prior experience with CPS in my professional life, and Agassiz really stands out among CPS elementary schools. The teachers and families are great and the school has a warm, welcoming feel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2011

this school is great! Teachers are excellent. there is wonderful communication between teachers, staff , students and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2011

My children just finished their third year at this school and thus far, I am pleased with their progress. This year one of my children need some speech therapy and the school has a speech therapist on staff which was a wonderful in-house resource. Regarding the person concerned about the different academic performance between boys and girls, there is a lot of empirical data documenting that boys begin to lag behind girls academically as young as 4th grade. What this person witnessed in the higher achieving females is a wide-spread challenge that all educators and parents have to work against. While it is possible that the school treats children different based on gender, I won't pretend that does not happen, it's also a developmental pattern that must be addressed by everyone involved in the boys' lives.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2011

You can not go wrong with sending your children to this school. We send both our girls to the school and can not be happier with the quality of instruction, the fantastic teachers or the before and after programs. Mira Weber does a superb job at running the school in a way that is structured but doesn't feel overly coached. The teachers are the best. I would HIGHLY recommend sending your children to the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2011

The previous poster addressed issues regarding graduation that were erroneous. First, Agassiz has traditionally had boys and girls wearing maroon. To suggest that one was intended to highlight the incompetence of a group is ridiculous. That the inclusive nature of Agassiz be so misunderstood by highlighting a student who has always had full access to every part of the school day and year, including graduation, is also a great misconception. The writer apparently missed several other students with Autism who were graduating throughout the ceremony, and were neither highlighted or noticed. Third, out of a staff of approximately 30, nearly a third are males, and are excellent models for all of our students. It is unfortunate that the males in this graduating class were not as academically successful, and that issue should (and will!) be examined. But to make sweeping generalizations about a school based on a single observation of a class is limited and short-sighted. Know that Agassiz is the kind of school that vigorously examines itself, and is constantly looking for ways to improve. Please consider removing this review.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 14, 2011

I attended this years class of 2011 graduation and was pleased and disturbed with the overall instruction that is going on with the school.. I was pleased that many of the students were academic achievers however I was disappointed in the fact that most of them were female students. That isn't to say that I didn't appreciate their success but I felt that more/equal attention needed to be given to the male students. Maybe there needs to be more male instructors/role models in order to level the playing field. Also their cap and gowns were different The Girls wore white, while the boys wore red, which suggests that the dumb kids were the one whow wore red. Not to mention they gave the special needs boy his diploma, last. And they need to help him him find his seat afterwards. Achievement after achievement was handed out to the girls, while it seemed like the boys wanted to sink in their the boys just sat their slumped in their seats. They must have felt really low. It may seem like a small thing but I woudldn't send my son to a school where the girls are going to get preferential treatment. I'm sorry. It needs to be addressed.. Hire more men!!!


Posted May 25, 2011

I went to Agassiz in the 60's. graduated in 69. we live on kenmore. & there was many kids>167>who lived on seminary & kenmore.between diversey & lincoln.AGASSIZ had a mixture of races then. NOT only did AGASSIZ teach us what we needed to learn, WE taught the value of family & friends.! TO this day many of us are still in contact with each other. AGASSIZ has ALWAYS went beyond what is required. I EVEN HAD 4 of my kids go to AGASSIZ. WHO ARE NOW GROWN. AGASSIZ KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK. AS YOU HAVE IN THE PAST.


Posted September 27, 2009

It's diverse and kid-friendly
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

We are so grateful for Agassiz and the awesome staff. We had our 1st grader in a test into school, and found that the staff and Principle were very disorganized, unresponsive to our concerns and questions as a new family, and only focused on homework homework homework. In an afternoon, the staff at Agassiz returned our call, and our child is now set up in the lovely 1st/2nd grade classroom. Her needs will be met, I'm sure of it, and we know that this school honors and respects children and parents. So grateful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

The school has a great environment. Teachers/staff and parents that all really care about the school and are really involved to make it a better place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2009

This is an excellent school. My daughter was in a first grade class of 17 children. The administration fights to keep the class size small. She has music and dance/drama one time per week and Arabic three times per week. She reads very well and has benefited from the creative writing program. I went to the science fair and listened to a 5 year old from kindergarten explaining his science project, and it was quite obvious he understood the concepts. Apparently, the kindergarten teacher there is fantastic. She has been in 2 shows. They work very hard on behavior and maintaining order, and it shows. The aides are great. Even the security guard is actively involved. They have a decent after-school program with lots of art classes. They have gym twice a week. There is an autism program & a good special ed program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2009

I recommend Agassiz for the early grades (PK-5). Mira Weber, the principal for almost 2 years now, was formerly a teacher here, and the students like and respect her. She is doing a good job of involving neighborhood parents in activities and fund-raising. My child loves to read and enjoys math. The level of homework is appropriate - you don't spend every moment after school and work doing busy work or burning out on difficult assignments. Agassiz is especially strong at live performances. Parents and staff are working on getting a choir together, too. Hopefully band will follow. The student population is changing - this year's kindergarten and pre-k is much less diverse than the other grades. I suspect this is due to the recent recession. This causes some tension, but I am hopeful that parents will continue to work together as they have in the past.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female72%
Male63%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic62%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income58%
Non-low income76%
Students with disabilities (IEP)20%
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female83%
Male63%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income63%
Non-low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)20%
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female87%
Male64%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income75%
Non-low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students78%
Female84%
Male64%
Black78%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White82%
Low income75%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female97%
Male72%
Black89%
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income88%
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female70%
Male67%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female70%
Male42%
Black57%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income48%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students71%
Female87%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income65%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female80%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female92%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income71%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female83%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income65%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students92%
Female100%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income88%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students64%
Female82%
Male50%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income57%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female91%
Male64%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanic90%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income71%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 36% 23%
White 33% 51%
Black 26% 18%
Two or more races 3% 3%
Asian 2% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs. Doris Negron-Wilks

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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2851 North Seminary Avenue
Chicago, IL 60657
Phone: (773) 534-5725

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