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GreatSchools Rating

Lincoln Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 810 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 11 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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36 reviews of this school


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Posted July 22, 2008

Fantastic. My child was in the pre-IB and was always challenged. He was well prepared for one of the top selective entrance high schools. The band program is FANTASTIC. The sports programs are good too. The principal has a great manner with the students. Boys are well appreciated in the school, which can sometimes be a problem in strong academic programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2008

Our daughter has been at Abraham Lincoln for 3 years now (grades 1-3). We have been uniformly impressed by the school, in particular the quality of the teachers and the high level of parental involvement. The qualities that make this school so wonderful are not the obvious, quanitifable ones (test scores, student-to-teacher ratio, etc), though Lincoln holds its own in these areas, but in the care, attention to detail, and esprit de corps of the place. Everyone, from the principal to the teachers, students and parents, cares deeply about the school. To give an example, in second grade, our daughter's teacher organized a toy drive for children in Tanzania, and her daughter, a member of the Peace Corps, personally delivered the toys. There are many other stories like this. We really feel our daughter is becoming a 'citizen of the world' at this school, learning far beyond the standard curriculum.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2008

I agree with the 12/14/07 poster. This is an excellent public school but it is still a public school. The point about the teachers union I think simply means that the teachers will not be uniformly excellent. The more important point is that roughly 10% of Lincoln students in our experience (three years) are disruptive or 'acting out'. You have to be a really excellent teacher, as was our 2nd grade teacher, to create a great environment for learning despite 2-4 students being incorrigibly off-task and attention-needy. But the overall environment, including the diversity of student personalities and attitudes, is one of Lincoln's great _positive_ features. Real life involves making success with sometimes anarchic situations and imperfect but real people.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2007

For a neighborhood public school in a big city Lincoln is outstanding. Measured against schools in more affluent subsurbs or even the city's elite gifted schools it holds its own but is not at the very top tier. Highly involved parents and fairly affluent district boundaries relieve some of the financial pressure an urban school might face. Fund raising is continuous but the result is better equipment and facilities. I sympathize with the reviewer whose child had a negative experience but you have to realize that a big bureaucracy and strong teachers union create challenges. You have to be more aggressive than you would in a smaller suburban or private school. Follow the protocol but don't be afraid to escalate your concerns to the principal or area level quckly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2007

I'm in the 7th grade and all the teachers are wonderful and they won't let you fail. None of the teachers will. I must admit it is a little crowded but other than that, it's an excellent school with excellent teachers.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 2, 2007

We were terribly disappointed in Lincolon Elementary. Although we had heard wonderful things about Lincoln Elementary, we found that safety and academic quality were lacking. We reported numerous problems with our child being verbally and physically bullied by one specific child, but we felt the school did very little to address the problem. My daughter's first grade teacher was mediocre at best. Her second grade teacher was little better, but certainly not of the caliber we expected, given Lincoln Elementary's reputation. Parent involvement in the school is very high, so that was one positive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2007

This School is exceptional! My child is very well educated. I love all the programs this school has like the school's impressive band and sports program. There are so many ways for parents to volunteer too!! it's an amazing school and I am very proud to send my child there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2007

Lincoln has everything: music, art, French, P.E., recess, small class sizes in the lower grades (this is a recent development), band, chorus, afterschool programs starting from 3rd grade up, and committed teachers. There are a myriad of opportunities for parental involvement in the classroom as well as at events like science fairs, book sales, spring auction, etc. The classroom work is challenging because the children come from relatively affluent families, most of whom could pay for private schools but choose Lincoln instead. Best of all, we can walk to school and my daughter has become friends with dozens of kids who all live in our neighborhood.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2006

Lincoln is a wonderful neighborhood school. The parental involvement is great...a real sense of community in a big city. There is a great deal expected of these kids. The curriculum is advanced and accelerated. If your child is an average student, they are likely to feel behind. If your child is advanced, they will be challenged every day. I am thrilled my kids go to an academically superior school with kids from all different backgrounds. Its great prep for 'real life'.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2006

Parents are very involved. Class sizes are above 25 for most grades. Teachers seem to have long tenure at school; same with administrators and staff. Facilities are historic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2006

It's great. The Open Court Reading Program is one of the best per literacy experts and used here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2006

Overall it is a good neighborhood school. At least all my neighbors like it. But I am concerned about their course work. The students seemed not that interested and involved in their course works. And I do hear stories of students being bored at class and reading novels in math class, etc. The principal was not listening to your questions and always replied in a very political way. The students who are in preIB are totally different than those who are not. But overall, it still has its good reputation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2006

Lincoln has 3 schools within the school, neighborhood, pre-IB for 6-8th graders and EFAC. French school K-8th for native french speakers. All programs are good. Also available is great band program 5-8, tution based and sports programs for 5-8 (mostly parent run)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2006

Really high level of parent involvement. The PTA sponsors the art teacher. There is music class and band practice. The school really emphazises the humanities. french is the foreign language taught since Kindergarden. There is a climbing wall in the gym. Afterschool activities such as basketball and running. Excellent neighboorhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2005

Great institution ! My child received excellent preparation and now is applying for the best high schools in the city.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2005

Lincoln is a wonderful neighborhood school with an extremely competent principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female88%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income36%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female90%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income64%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female100%
Male95%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Low income91%
Non-low income99%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female95%
Male87%
Black91%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income82%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female88%
Male96%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income69%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female91%
Male86%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Low income54%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students91%
Female95%
Male87%
Black77%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income67%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female93%
Male78%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income71%
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students93%
Female94%
Male93%
Black82%
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income81%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female92%
Male90%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income69%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female92%
Male98%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income81%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female83%
Male91%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial81%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income46%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)47%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female85%
Male87%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial69%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income46%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)53%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 63% 51%
Black 12% 18%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 4%
Hispanic 8% 24%
Two or more races 8% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
Performing and written arts
  • Dance

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mark C Armendariz

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
Performing arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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615 West Kemper Place
Chicago, IL 60614
Phone: (773) 534-5720

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