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GreatSchools Rating

Lincoln Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 810 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 11 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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36 reviews of this school


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Posted April 28, 2014

Lincoln Elementary is a great school because its teachers are so dedicated. They go the extra mile to help Lincoln's students achieve. Many of them are parents themselves so they speak with experience, knowledge and empathy. Lincoln is awesome!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2013

The principal has been doing a poor job communicating with parents. I got almost no feedback on my child's progress in the conference. I feel the teacher barely knows who my child is. Maybe because the class size is 32.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2013

This is still a CPS school and adheres to the same CPS bureaucratic agenda that is expected of all CPS schools. So, in that sense, it is not special. IN other words, same overtesting, common core, NWEA BS that has been proven to be useless for children. It is only helpful to the ones making those tests. They are profiting off of our children. The parent involvement is high, enough that the school has now gotten approval to expand. There seems to be an elitist mentality here and the Principal I dont know enough to comment about. My child loves school, and I guess for CPS this is the best it is going to get. I do not think the teachers and Principal do a good job of collaborating with the parents. Parents know their children best. No one asked for a snapshot of my child's strengths and they have not identified my childs strengths. A good school/great teachers will do that. Dont expect it here. I just get the standard report card, and comparing to the norms. You will be find that at any school, even if you pay for it. But otherwise my child is just a "brick in the wall".
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2013

Question for parents at the school....is the October 5th post representative of the mindset of the families at the school? And this is coming from an upper middle class, right-leaning white male that is relocating his family to Chicago....wow.


Posted October 24, 2013

Lincoln School is a nice School ,my daughter attend one year and has a quick improve at math and english. It's very helpful for her.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2013

Lincoln is the best neighborhood school in Chicago area. Strong leadership and vision from the principle, excellent teachers, active parents. It has low percentage of blacks and Hispanics, very low percentage of low-income students. In terms of students exceeding state standards, it outperforms all magnet schools and even a few selective enrollment schools. At least as good as the schools from the burbs. Imaging what the rumored $30~50 mil new building could do for the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2013

Lincoln is a wonderful school. The teachers are engaging and the children have fun while being challenged. There are numerous field trips throughout the year beginning in first grade, and in addition, numerous guest speakers, presenters, and performers are brought in. The children receive a well-rounded education that prepares them to enter the most competitive high schools in Chicago.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 25, 2013

Had to laugh at May 17 poster who missed the point entirely- if your child gets into a selective enrollment (college prep) HS in Chicago they are definitely on the right hand side of the curve. The May 2 poster AGREES WITH YOU!!! It sounds like the May 2 poster had one child like the May 17 poster and another who needed assistance and the school fell down. Hard to disagree with a single family who has experienced both the good and bad at one school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2013

I have to strongly disagree with the 5/2/13 posting - this school is a real gem! The teachers and principal are committed to excellence in education as well as personal development of the children. My child transferred to Lincoln in 4th grade from a highly regarded, private school in Lincoln Park and is now thriving - getting good enough grades to be accepted into a college prep high school. No school is perfect but for a public school, this comes pretty darn close.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2013

This is a great school if your child is on the right hand side of the bell curve. Strong fundraising means techers never lack for equipment or supplies. Teachers are decent and along with dedicated room parents things are pretty good. Sports and band programs are solid. However if your child is below the mean Lincoln's ability (and sadly among some staff, willingness) to help isn't great. One of our kids has had a wonderful experience but our other has been poorly served. If you're willing to push and work the system it's a pretty good school but if you think you can go on autopilot and be assured the school is watching out for your below average or special needs child you're making a sad and dangerous mistake.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2013

I would like to clarify the misleading information in the 3/19/13 review. My first grader is in the classroom NEXT TO the boiler room (no class meets IN the boiler room), which was a music room for years. Not only is there a window in the room, but it is the only classroom with a second exit (fire door) that goes directly outside to the back of the school - - something I took comfort in the day that a gunman went into Sandyhook Elementary. Also, there are only 23 students in each of the first grade classes - - pretty wonderful for a CPS school. As for the kindergarten, there are two full-time, experienced kindergarten teachers in one over-sized classroom (specially designed for kindergarteners) teaching about 18 kids each. Again a nice student-teacher ratio. There's no question that having full-day kindergarten at Lincoln next year will put additional pressure on the school, but having more space available at DePaul for the older grades will help the school to address this challenge next year and possibly beyond. I have been a parent at this school for many years and, while it is not the small school it was when we first arrived, it has done well as the population swelled.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2013

Lincoln was a great school but the overcrowding situation is deteriorating the quality of the school. A first grade class now meets in the boiler room with no windows, half the library was taken away last year and now they are talking about taking away the full library for next year. We lost the music classrooms and now band meets in the auditorium at the expense of assemblies and opportunities for kids to gain experience on stage. Currently there are 36 kindergarteners meeting in a single classroom. With the mandated full-day kindergarten the situation is worse. We know the principal and teachers will do their best, but a school with no library and no music classroom cannot be a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2012

I have no idea why so many people think this school is so great. We were here for 5 years and had very few good experiences. It is over crowded, the principal is not approachable. I contacted him about an issue and his response was sorry to hear about that and left it at that. The french program is a joke! The school spends so much time preparing for the ISATs that the kids get stressed out! I could go on and on about all the problems at this school. They boast about having smart boards in all the classrooms but all that means is the teachers play videos on them for the kids. My kids came home with terrible headaches almost everyday from them. Don't let test scores fool you! There are only a few teachers here that are amazing. If you think knowing how to take a standardized test and filling in test bubbles properly are skills your child needs then this is a great school. If you want your child challenged and given positive criticism then avoid this school. Some one said that the principal is great with the kids. I have to strongly disagree. I personally saw him screaming, yes screaming at kindergarten children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2012

Wonderful school, wonderful principal. Principal sets high expectations but also has sense of humor that makes him approachable and establishes rapport with kids and parents alike. Parents welcoming, incredibly involved resulting in multiple enrichment opportunities unavailable in other schools. Band program a great program for all kids (with funding for those who can't afford an instrument) - whether your kid is a superstar musician or just wants to participate, they'll get a lot out of it. Separate music teacher and band teachers all first rate. Core subjects all strong, absolutely filled to the gills with teachers who strive for more.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2012

This school is fantastic. They have a fun, active school, with Junior Great books, sports, music and art. They also begin French in kindergarten. There is a bit of overcrowding, because everyone is trying to move into the area. It is a great since of community and friendship, where people are willing to help each other out. The school is extremely clean but dated. They have smartboards that the FOL raised funds for and they encourage summer reading.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2012

My son is a third grader at Lincoln. This school is excellent. Great teachers, good environment, and very engaging parents. The academic progress is very competitive. We are lucky to go to this school because this is better than a lot of private schools!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2011

This is an excellent school that provides a balance of challenging academics with top notch after school activities. I see involved parents, devoted teachers and a motivated principal who is approachable and available to work out any concern. The end product of this school are happy students who are nurtured and have great friends. This is truly an exceptional school. Go Lincoln!!!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2009

The teachers, principal, staff, parents and students. It is an awesome school dedicated to doing the best for our students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

I love this wonderful public school because their fabulous teachers nurtured my son right into a challenging college prep High School and now continue to teach and nurture my daughter. Their wonderful PTA and FOL work hard and well to provide extracuriculars like Art, Music, Band, Computers & Technology, PE and even a Climbing Wall. And now, we are even going for a Greenhouse Rooftop Garden !!! How wonderful is that? My children have always felt safe and at home when they are at school. I love this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2009

Lincoln is a wonderful school. It has many programs like band and sports, but the truth is, it's the parents. Many of the parents come from relatively wealthy families, and are kind to put their time and money into Lincoln. We also have a wonderful principal, who has organized many new oppurtunitiess for students. My children were both in I.B, and they were challenged evry day at Lincoln. The teachers are not the best in the city, but they do not have any teachers worth criticizing. Most students also live close to school, and the surrounding neighborhood to Lincoln is very welcoming. Overall, Lincoln is a great school, especially for a Public School.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female88%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income36%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female90%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income64%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female100%
Male95%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Low income91%
Non-low income99%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female95%
Male87%
Black91%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income82%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female88%
Male96%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income69%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female91%
Male86%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Low income54%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students91%
Female95%
Male87%
Black77%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income67%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female93%
Male78%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income71%
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students93%
Female94%
Male93%
Black82%
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income81%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female92%
Male90%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income69%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female92%
Male98%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income81%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female83%
Male91%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial81%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income46%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)47%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female85%
Male87%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial69%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income46%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)53%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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State
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 63% 51%
Black 12% 18%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 4%
Hispanic 8% 24%
Two or more races 8% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
Performing and written arts
  • Dance

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mark C Armendariz

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
Performing arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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615 West Kemper Place
Chicago, IL 60614
Phone: (773) 534-5720

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