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GreatSchools Rating

McPherson Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 617 students

Our school has the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 6 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted June 22, 2014

Improving, renovating, accelerating. My kind if neighborhood school. Promoting healthy lifestyle, parent volunteers always available. Staff is always caring and ready to help students and parents. Looking forward to next year!:)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2014

One thing to keep in mind is that most people who post on these sites are employees. It is an honor system. You can click on whatever you want at the end.


Posted March 8, 2014

McPherson is definitely full of caring administrators and staff who strive to make a positive difference and do their best every day. I agree with the last reviewer about being suspicious about an author's intentions and purpose in regards to to an unfair, untrue and attacking anonymous post. It is unfortunate that some people are just plain miserable and mean and need to blame others for their "frustration" in life.


Posted February 23, 2014

No SPED class room at McPherson has 33 kids. The maximum is 13 and includes at least one teacher and several aids,most classes are below this. Under Illinois rules, students with mild disabilities who spend less than 20 percent of their time in special ed must be in pull-out classes with 15 or fewer students (or 17 with a paraprofessional), while those with more severe disabilities who receive special education classes at least 60 percent of the time must be in classes with no more than eight students (13 with a paraprofessional). In preschool, special education classes are limited to five students, or 10 with a paraprofessional. There was an attempt to change this last year but was successfully fought by CTU, parents (I testified) and others. Mr. Chico the chairman of the State Board got the matter dropped for which he should be thanked. Please get your facts straight. If you need/want an explanation further, contact the principal or the case manager for McPherson. Either will gladly clarify the issue for you and explain the CPS Guidelines for Special Education Programs"
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2014

My daughter started Kindergarten this year at Mcpherson. We were a little nervous, because this (our neighborhood school) is not rated very high. But we are so happy that we made this choice. Our daughter loves this school, her teacher is a wonderful person. She is caring, motivating and extremely committed to her work. I see wonderful things happening at this school. This is a great school wish only needs more people out of the neighborhood to join!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2014

I find it horrible that in a SPED class from grades 3 -5 that I licensed teacher has to service 33 students! The kiddos are expected to pass the state testing standards and how can that happen when the teacher is overloaded with students. The teacher is trying her best and has high standards for her students. Unfortunately, I have heard she is looking for another position because of the poor working conditions. Doesn't CPS have a limit on how many students a SPED class should contain? If not, there should be! I would have for the school to lose such a valuable teacher. Please for the good of the kiddos and the teacher, please give the overworked teacher some support!


Posted November 6, 2013

My son started kindergarten at McPherson this year and we could not be happier with the school. He adores his teacher, and we are thrilled with his class size (17!). His curiosity has sky-rocketed about so many things -- math, nutrition, art, etc. We're very pleased with the differentiated learning that is happening through the RTI program. We feel confident that he is being challenged, and also that his love of learning is not being hindered. We love that weekly Spanish class starts already in kindergarten, and that he has access to many great after-school programs, including fitness, dance, and chess programs as we feel he's ready for them. We also enjoy having access to the Raz Kids reading program at home, and enjoy hearing that he's learning to build stories through the Writers' Workshop program already. Finally, we're so happy with the group of engaged parents who are working to make so many more things possible at the school, including a campus grounds redevelopment and new after-school programs. We feel lucky that he gets to spend his day in such a beautiful building, and that the children and families he's surrounded by share such a wonderful sense of community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2013

This is the perfect neighborhood school. The students represent true diversity while the teachers and administration offer best practices, individualized learning and attention, flexibility, compassion, and high academic standards. Regular ed children go to "specials" daily. Not only are the computer, music, Spanish, etc. teachers excellent, but they attend specials with all levels of special ed peers, learning to interact appropriately. If your child has ANY level of learning need, whether it is LD, BD, autism, or bilingual education, this is the school for you. The case manager and administration are some of the most committed, professional, reasonable people you will find in the state much less CPS in terms of dealing with special needs, and the whole faculty is competent and committed to the success of all students - special needs, regular ed, and advanced/gifted alike will flourish here. The school test scores represent an average of all types of learners who are welcome and well served, so some (like one of my children in a self contained classroom) will test in the 30's-40's and remain in special ed for all of K-12, while others test in the 90's and attend an IB program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

Our son was in the autism program for k-8. The education and additional assistance he received was above and beyond. He is now in a very good high school in Chicago and is doing well. This is due to the preparation and care he received at McPherson for a large part. From the Administration down, there was an attitude of caring for the kids no matter their need or background. I was there all the time and saw the wonders that were done and the teachers and staff that went the extra to help their kids. For a look at something, see how well groups in the school like the PTO and LSC are so involved and even more how the Friends of McPherson has really stepped up with parental involvement and support. Note, please that one disgruntled parent below cites petty concerns and the remainder praise the school and poeople.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2013

In my opinion McPherson is the best school in the area. Thinking back 30 years ago, I realize that McPherson was the only school that had ESL at the time. McPherson revolutionized ESL, and Mrs. Radoslaw promoted it very nicely. Mrs. Chase was the best Business Woman/Principal of the time and in my eyes she still is. Mrs. Condon takes the title as the best teacher. SHE PUT UP WITH ME, DIDN'T SHE! Just kidding, great homeroom teacher!


Posted June 24, 2013

I have had 3 children graduate from McPherson, and have one left. This school has been a wonderful learning experience for my children, who we transferred here from a private school. The administration and teachers have always been available to discuss and help to solve problems, and have encouraged my children, who have varying levels of ability, to succeed. After leaving McPherson, I have ahad 2 children go to selectric enrollment high schools, and one in a magnet program, and all have done well academically. The auditorium is certainly old and even somewhat decrepid, but it does not keep the school from putting on musicals, operas, and other performances. With the sever budget cuts from CPS, one often has to choose between education and facilities, and the administration at McPherson has chosen in favor of teachers and programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2012

I have two children who attend McPherson who are having wonderful experiences. I had to make a last minute decision on enrollment and am just so happy that this occurred. This is not my area school and came across it accidently. My daughters LOVE going to school and don t want to miss even when they are sick. They have excelled in their classes. The only downfall has been my daughter s first progress report this year. They weren t her usual scores and after communicating with the teacher, it turned out that specific information that should have been taught last year had not been taught by her teacher (who is no longer at McPherson) then. This was a challenge which she has overcome. I feel that McPherson as a whole is awesome! There are wonderful teachers and wonderful volunteers along with other wonderful parents who are just as involved as I am. I would most DEFINITELY recommend this school for other parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2012

My children attended this school since pre-school. The teachers are great, except a couple that doesn't teach Science well enough for 5th graders that caused many kids in class almost failed. The administration is lack of communication & customer service skills that hurts me many times. I did mention to the leaders and hope for the change. The Assistant Principal is the Best.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2012

I have a daughter currently ready to start fourth grade who has attended since first. We were apprehensive at first since she had been in private for pre-school and kindergarten. She has continued to excel and has had great teachers here. We have never had any issues with any of the staff and have been impressed with how pleasant and helpful they are. We are also glad to see that students are encouraged to continue to performing and learning above their grade level. They receive the instruction that they need so as not to get bored or overlooked. They also have many events designed to bring the parents/teachers/community together. Very nice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2011

My son is has been at McPherson since Kindergarten and is now in 2nd grade, reading at a 5th grade reading level. His teachers have been consistently excellent, highly engaged, and focused on giving him opportunities to do extra and more creative work in subjects where he masters the basics quickly. The parents at the school are very friendly and involved and the before/aftercare program is a lifesaver. I am occasionally frustrated by the inconsistencies and poor communication of the administration at the school, but I try to put that aside an focus on the terrific education my son is getting at the neighborhood school two blocks from our home. Yes, you can indeed send your child to public school in Chicago and have a great experience!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2010

I'm a proud parent of 2 McPherson students. I love how McPherson's entire staff acknowledge the students. For example, when the students walk through the hall ways they're always told "Hello, How are you?" or "Great job!" when they're behaving. They have incredible programs to help students with special needs. My son has a speech impediment and I already see improvement after 2 months of speech therapy. It really does feel like a great big family. The principal Ms. Mendoza, as busy as she is, is always seen in the hallways talking to the students. Ms. Mendoza is very involved with the students and parents. Whenever you need to talk to her, she makes herself available and makes you feel important. She really goes out of her way to make McPherson feel like a home for every student and parent. I highly recommend this school!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2010

After concerns with attending a CPS school, we reluctantly took the plunge with McPherson due to the cost (free!) and location near our home in Lincoln Square. We are so glad we did! My daughter's teacher is Dawn McCarthy and her assistant Dina Mentor. We couldn't be more pleased; its been an exceptional experience and we truly feel like we've won the lottery. My daughter has made huge leaps and bounds since she began in September. While the program is definitely play-based, their is a clear academic approach as well. We will consider this school for Kindergarten. The downside is the lack of visability/involvement of the principal and limited Parent involvement that you see in other schools. However, this school is definitely worth considering, especially for this magnificent neighborhood, I'm sure in a few years, it will be on the 'buzz' list. I should also add we love the diversity too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2009

My daughter was placed here in a special ed program by the district for third grade this year. I have been impressed by this school in so many ways. Teachers are caring and professional, the principal is a strong leader, there is a nice thriving parent community and the emphasis on academics is strong and consistent. We didn't want to leave our old school, but McPherson has won us over!! It is a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2009

My daughter is in her first year of preschool. I couldn't of asked for a better teacher. Ms McCarthy is a great teacher. Her and Mrs Mentor make a great team. My daughter loves being in her class. I'm very glad that my daughter will be in her class again next year. I know she'll be ready for kindergarten.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2008

My Child is in his second year of Pre-K at McPherson and I have been very impressed with the pre-k program, esp. his teacher Miss McCarthy, who is a true gem. She really cares about each child as an individual and i feel that she 'gets' my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
67%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students41%
Female45%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learners15%

Reading

All Students40%
Female46%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic34%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities46%
English language learners16%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female47%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic51%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income48%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities61%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female50%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income46%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
Students without disabilities59%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students84%
Female80%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic86%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income84%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)42%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learners58%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female40%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income40%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students44%
Female55%
Male31%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students45%
Female33%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female43%
Male44%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income43%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities46%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female46%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic51%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income52%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female54%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income48%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)7%
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students83%
Female83%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)53%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students46%
Female48%
Male44%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic41%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities54%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female70%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 78% 24%
White 9% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 7% 4%
Black 4% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Two or more races 1% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
Computer specialist(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Gardening teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Reading specialist(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Nurse(s)
School psychologist
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Security personnel
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many needs and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program for very challenging needs such as autism or complete visual impairment
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Science lab
Clubs
  • Gardening

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Opera
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Poetry
Clubs
  • Dance club: Ballroom
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Foreign languages
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
Clubs
  • Gardening
  • Girls on the run

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • International Baccalaureate (IB)
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School start time
  • 8:00 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • Carmen Alicia Mendoza
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Age at which early childhood or Pre-K program begins
  • 3 years old
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • International Baccalaureate (IB)
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Foreign languages
  • Global
  • Humanities
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many needs and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program for very challenging needs such as autism or complete visual impairment
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Counseling
  • Differentiated learning programs
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • Transportation provided for special education students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Learning lab
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Music room
  • Parent center
  • Performance stage
  • Playground
  • Science lab
Partnerships with local resources and organizations
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Flag football
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Opera
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Dance club: Ballroom
  • Gardening
  • Girl scouts
  • Girls on the run
  • Student council/government
  • Yearbook
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Monitor the playground
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

4728 N Wolcott Ave
Chicago, IL 60640
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-2625

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