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GreatSchools Rating

Prussing Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 632 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted January 12, 2013

i really like the school and the teachers are great.the staff in the office is very nice to the students to> but my one concern is the vice princibal and the princibal. They are always looking for ways to get the kids in trouble.Ever since we got a new vice princibal two years ago there have been thousands of detentions and suspentions.She and the princible need to be replaced.


Posted April 29, 2012

My daughter went to this school when she was in 2nd and 3rd grade. She had to move to many different schools every 2 years because of living arrangements and I hated this one the most. The teachers used to embarrass her in front of her classmates making her feel unintelligent as the rest of them. They literally would make her feel discouraged and did not care for the people they didn't like or were bothersome. She was little at this time and did not realize that they were not treating her properly until I transferred her to another school and remembered how her previous school before Prussing treated her. They offered piano lessons during class. The piano teacher would pinch my daughter's classmates and her spine because they weren't sitting straight enough. All she learned from that piano teacher were the main keys C, D, E, F, G for 3 weeks. It was a waste of money! My daughter got a detention for having too many tissues in her desk and that her desk was messy. Therefore, they felt it was right to move her desk away from her classmates and onto the center of the classroom crying as they tilted and dumped everything inside her desk on the floor in front of everyone in her class.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2011

1st year here, but before i brought my daughter to this school i heard & read negative remarks about itl. 1st day of school wrong info & paperwork were given. Its fine, things happe., 2nd day i went to office for paperwork & question regarding medications, place looked unorganized as staff. The teacher she has now is great, easy to talk to & personable. Office members,something else. Not all, just some.They are rude, act as if you're a bother, sometimes act as if they dont see you waiting. I've seen principal several times & doesnt seem friendly no eye contact or present himself. I helped out at Fall Festival (i loved) a Deputy Sheriff walked towards me (my husband) & so did principal thinking something was wrong. I work in Pediatrics for 7 plus yrs. When a client/patient walks in they are always to be greeted & asked if help is needed. This school does not offer that Mannerism. Last straw for me might be when a staff member came out of office being loud through hallway walked up to me as i was speaking to another staff member regarding reviews on this school, stating she didnt/doesnt like my tone when i come in the school. Really?! I come to find out it was the OFFICE MANAGER!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2011

This is our first year at this school and I am truly disappointed. First of all there is no communication between anyone. Trying to find out what is going on either in the class room or with the school is like pulling teeth. There is a monthly news letter, and that does not contain any information worth while. I went to a PTO meeting and it was a very disturbing display. If I could afford to send my children to the closest catholic school I would. I have had numerous conferences with the teacher and she is a wonderful person and is willing to do anything to help out. It really more the principle that I have a problem with. He is rude arrogant and need to be removed from the school. He says that his best interest is the kids, but I believe he is more interested in what goes in his pocket and at the front of his name. I tried to e-mail him and he does not put an email address on the web-page. Aren't principles suppose to be accessible to the parents. I guess he doesn't want us to contact him with our concerns. Parents if you have kids at this school please help us get him out!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2011

This is in response to the parent who wrote this school is a dump. I think it's very sad that they would leave their children in a dump for 4 years. My mother once said, "If it seems like the whole world is wrong, you should probably look once again at yourself."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2011

I think it's sad to have taken the time to craft this rant when, clearly, you have personal issues best addressed in person and not on a community post. The only thing your poor children are suffering from is your inability to cope, move, communicate effectively to end the "nightmare" or find a solution that doesn't involve slander. The staff at Prussing is professional, helpful and doing the best they possibly can. Constructive criticism is one thing, rambling rants are really unproductive.


Posted April 4, 2011

This school is a total nightmare!!!! My children have been in this dump unfortunately 4 years now due to being in area & not having much of a choice right now. My poor children have been suffering the consequences due this school's unprofessionalism and ignorance! For the record the principal of this school is rude & is totally unqualified for this job if you ask me because he can care less of the kids' education/well being or even the parents for that matter. As for his office staff they are all a total joke & should not be working with children either. Finally, as far as the teachers go I wouldn't say they are all bad, but yes, there is a BIG percentage that are absolutely awful. So please parents beware...if you are deciding to move into this area for this school I would definitely think twice about it for your children sake.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2011

My son is at Prussing for PreK. I feel the education is wonderful because of the teacher. She is compassionate, caring, intelligent, considerate and has a genuine passion for developing our children into educated individuals. She is a gift to our community. That being said, the office staff and principal have much to be desired. They have a rudeness and level of arrogance I have not experinced in my lifetime. I also have seen a Chicago Model of "Pay to Play Politics" that I find extremely disturbing and of much concern to parents as weli as the boundry being clouded between professional and personal relationships with the principle, the priciple's family and some parents. This issue causes an uneasiness in LSC and PTO meetings for the parents in attendance. The behavior of administration makes it difficult for the teachers who are very supportive and hard working to shine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2010

The office staff at Prussing has been so helpful as far as my daughter and I are concerned. My daughter transferred in from out of state and had a very difficult time adjusting. The office staff went out of their way to make her feel welcome and comfortable. I have nothing to say but thank you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2010

My child called sick from the classroom and when I called back not knowing the kids can call from the classroom the office staff acted as though I was bothering them wondering why I saw Prussing School on my caller ID. My child sat in class for another 2 hours with a toothache & earache til she came home wondering why I did not come get her! Only then did I learn that she called from the classroom.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2010

The office staff and principal have to be the rudest people I have ever met. After sending my children to private schools, I can see the difference in consideration, honesty, and concern. This was the worst choice I could have made for my child!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2009

I agree with the parent who feels that the office staff is very rude. I also do not feel welcome. Every time I ask for help, or come in to ask questions or look for resources, they are very rude and I feel they are judging me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2009

I love the school. The primary and middle teachers are wonderful! The assistant principal and office staff have been really helpful and kind to my children and I live the fact I can pick up my children homework the next day when they are sick. The school is very clean and as a working mom it is nice to know my children can print their work at school. Prussing gets an A+
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2009

This school needs to focus more on student learning than ISAT scores. More emphasis should be placed on two important subjects such as Math and Science. There is also not enough parent and teacher interaction.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2008

This school is ok, I like the my son's teacher but alot of the teachers there have a weird sense of entitlement. And to the person who posted about not getting involved after going to only 1 meeting, what a cop out! I mean give me a break, you went once and never went back because you thought that the person was only trying to get her point across wasnt listening....If you want change for your kid get involved in the school! maybe she was only pushing her point because she is one of the only people who ever does anything for the school because parents like you just want to offer ideas and not participate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2008

First: the office staff, including the Principal, was not very friendly or comforting on the 1st day - and thereafter. Second: they may have good ratings with test scores, maybe because they require 2-3 hours of homework a night. My child is in 1st grade, & that is just too much. He was so consumed with school & homework, even on the weekends & holidays, that he doesn't want to go back to school. Third: they have no recess - at that age, they've got too much energy to be confined in school all day. Fourth: They only have after school programs for 3rd grade and up! We're moving out of the district so my son can go to a better school for 2nd Grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2008

I think Prussing school came a be a great school but I think the Principal needs to be more polite to the students and parents and provide more resources/after school programs. I feel he focuses to much on grades and less on the problem areas children are having. The office personnel needs more training on what is going on in the school and less on being rude. I also disagree with the way they handle student with problems in Math and Reading. They need more after school programs for our children. They expect a lot from our children with little resources for our children and the parents. Submitted by a parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2008

While some may feel the school may be operated very poorly it's certainly not for lack of trying. If more parents got involved I think there would be a huge turn around. The lack of parental participation is terrible, and I think if parents want to look for somewhere to blame the need to look in the mirror! Take some time and get involved!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2008

I think this school is operated very poorly. The staff is very unorganized.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2007

Prussing is a school that really cares. The teachers have tried their best to help my kids achieve their goals. The building is always clean and the staff are polite. The principal and the teachers are always willing to take an extra mile to make things better. My kids have spent a lot of time using technologies before and after school, which they couldn't do at their previous school. If all Chicago schools are like Prussing, there wouldn't be bad words about the system anymore.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female65%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low income60%
Not low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learners26%

Reading

All Students69%
Female65%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income61%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learners24%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female72%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White82%
Low income67%
Not low income80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learners46%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female75%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White56%
Low income56%
Not low income70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female86%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White82%
Low income75%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learners46%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students72%
Female79%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Low income66%
Not low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female61%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White72%
Low income53%
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female58%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income66%
Not low income72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities77%
English language learners20%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female61%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Low income59%
Not low income57%
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities68%
English language learners10%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students75%
Female69%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income71%
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female89%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income71%
Not low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students88%
Female92%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income84%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)60%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female78%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income74%
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female81%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income63%
Not low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
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Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 50% 51%
Hispanic 41% 24%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 4%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Black 1% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Performance stage
Music
  • Choir / Chorus

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Lloyd M Ehrenberg

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Cross country
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

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4650 North Menard Avenue
Chicago, IL 60630
Phone: (773) 534-3460

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