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GreatSchools Rating

Ray Elementary School

Public | PK-6 | 643 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 9 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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32 reviews of this school


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Posted June 1, 2014

This year this school is a joke! Classroom management bad, some of the teachers is terrible, and the principle worth of them all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2014

This school is the worst school since 2010. The principal do not care less about the special education students. Please think again about sending your child to this school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2014

No suuport to help students with learning disabilities. Especially student with ADHD. The teachers do not know how to work with the students. Sub- teacher been in the classroom since school began.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2013

I cannot believe that more parents have not posted poor ratings for this school. My child never felt that any of the adults at the school cared about the children.. My child suffered greatly academically but received high grades, possibly because there was such little expectation for the students in terms of growh and capabilities. There were practically NO hands on projects, material in language class was too advanced for younger children, and the librarian showed too many movies. The new leadership's plan to crack the whip academically does not include a plan for nurturing children, fostering a love for learning, and creating an environment where children will feel that they have a voice. I think the school is a disgrace. As in most schools, it's possible to luck up and get a good teacher here and there, but even they are stressed and barely able to focus on reaching each child in the class. If you have other choices, definitely try them before Ray. Also, NOT a nurturing environment for black children...boys in particular.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2013

My daughter is currently in the 6th grade and has been at Ray school since she was in 1st grade. Her first 4 years at the school were excellent - not perfect - but on par with any strong elementary school in the country. This exprience significantly changed when a new principal was hired for the 2011-2012 school year. The administration initially appeared to be energetic, visionary and intelligent. However, it was clear that her "visionary" goals for the school lacked planning, funds and overall competency. The principal has become a divisive figure in the school and the now defunct Ray University has nearly exhausted all school funds. Teachers report significant discontent to LSC and CPS board members and parents feel unwelcomed in the school. My strong hope is that a new administration will be able to lead the school back to previous strength and parents and students who left because of the poor leadership will consider returning to the school. Otherwise, I do believe that the school will continue to decline
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2013

The new administration is completely incompetent. There are so many problems allover,but especially in the higher grades. The new measures of security are laughable because there only recently has been action to make sure the students are supervised at ALL times. Many parents do not feel welcome. much work needs to be done or this school will absolutely end up on probation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 27, 2012

This school suffers academically and many of the teachers lack professionalism and character and are bad role models for students. The 2012 test scores for the most part went down considerably which is a reflection of the teachers ability to teach the children. Perhaps more focus should be on the classroom and not so much on recess.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2012

Ray School has had stagnant scores in the ISAT and NWEA for the past year. It is due to the majority of students that transfer out at the 3rd, 4th grades. And as for the ESL population, Ray School has a very small number of these students. It is a known fact within the department of Language and Culture. I wish parents would look ay data before posting such uninformed remarks
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 21, 2012

I have two kids at Ray and I've been pleasantly surprised with the school, despite my initial reservations. The new principal, Dr. Tatia Beckwith, is wonderful, an exceptional leader. I really think she's moving this school in a great direction. As for those who don't understand why it's rated a 5, the school has a large population of ESL students, which I think affects the scores, but the principal has been implementing great programs to address so many needs and issues, I think we'll be seeing some great improvements in the coming years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2011

Ray is a school with a diverse (racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically) student population, a dedicated professional staff, and a determined new Principal. Class sizes can be big but somehow the amazing teachers make it work. Ray has always had recess because the teachers have supported a longer school day which includes recess -- the new Principal has renamed recess "Brain Boost" because she understands the importance of recess for student learning. There is strong parent involvement at Ray. If you want a democratic and diverse school and you can deal with the challenges Chicago Public schools face, consider Ray. Ray families are great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2011

I don't really understand how do parents rank a school with 5/5 stars when the test scores are so average.... Ray school is on the campus of Univ. of Chicago. It should be doing at least a 8/10. I don't think some of the parents are aware or they are just fake reviews. There is a new principal so we will see. THe review I am giving is for 2010-2011 school year. THis is a new year so we will see.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2011

A great school has cooperation, collaboration and a strong sense of community. From the outside, Ray looks like it does, but it doesn't. The discipline problems in the upper grades are persistent. The staff has a few outstanding teachers, but the remaining are extremely rude and unprofessional. This new principal does have great challenges ahead of her.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2011

I have been so impressed by Ray Elementary. I couldn't ask for more in a neighborhood school. I love that my daughters go to school with kids in their own neighborhood. The classes are incredibly diverse, with children from all over the world. Their teachers are excellent, I can't imagine they could be better at a private school. Discipline is positive, and the teachers have independently chosen to stay longer in order to allow the children to have recess. Field trips are just often enough and not only fun but very educational and various. The administration is friendly and open to parental input. We've never had an issue abuot safety, either. We love Ray!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2011

I have been a parent in this school for the last 4 years, and I am convinced that this school is far away above the average. If the class size is not small (30 children average), classrooms are big enough to hold the actual groups. Teachers are really good professionals, from a wide ethnical and cultural diversity, as well as the students. This school is located into the University of Chicago Campus, and try to attend children from student parents at uchicago, but most of the university buildings for families are located outside the boundaries of Ray school district, this is something to be taken in count. Children Behavior at the school is very good, few disruptive events are well controlled.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2011

My daughter went to Ray School from the 2nd to the 5th grade. She had great teachers while she was there, and her social system revolved around smart kids who were working hard in school. In sixth grade we moved to the western suburbs (Glenbard) and my daughter started middle school. Teachers seemed less motivated, and social groups revolved more around appearance and popularity than academics. I can highly recommend Ray School. You can get a great education there. Also, Ray is one of the few schools left in the city with recess! Kids can go out on to the playground and play instead of just sitting in their classrooms during their breaks.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2011

BTW Ray used to go up to 8th grade for the person who did not know that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2011

I am very familiar with Ray, though no longer a parent. The quality of teaching in all grades is very high. The atmosphere of the school is outstanding with little commotion in the halls and very little fighting. Students play together well, an have the opportunity to do so because the school still has recesses. My son went there from 1st through 8th grades. That was long ago but I would be happy to have a grandson there today. The principal is certainly good. I have never figured out why many parents do not like her. Their experiences must be very different from mine.


Posted March 7, 2011

The teachers are good upt to about 3rd grade. Then a lot of things seem to fall off. There are a lot of cliques and parents who seem to be "in the know." If they do not consider you a part of the crowd, you and the child will have a lonely existence outside of the "neighborhood" school. The administration has been terrible the 4 years we have been there. If you have a child who has any challenges or concerns, send them elsewhere! A big disappointment!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 18, 2010

My child just finished the tuition based pre-school program at Ray and he loved the program and learned a lot. The teachers of the program are very caring and innovative, and really make the concepts that they are teaching come to life for the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Our son attended the school. The teachers and the principal were interested in the students, and created an enviornment conducive for learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female72%
Male65%
Black50%
Asian87%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income59%
Non-low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learners60%

Reading

All Students71%
Female84%
Male61%
Black56%
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income61%
Non-low income78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female49%
Male51%
Black31%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White67%
Low income30%
Non-low income68%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities56%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female69%
Male61%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White75%
Low income47%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students77%
Female79%
Male75%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income58%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female64%
Male60%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female74%
Male68%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female68%
Male58%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income50%
Non-low income76%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female68%
Male60%
Black51%
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income58%
Non-low income70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
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10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 49% 18%
White 21% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 12% 4%
Hispanic 10% 24%
Two or more races 7% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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5631 South Kimbark Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: (773) 535-0970

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