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GreatSchools Rating

Lenart Elementary Regional Gifted Center

Public | PK-8

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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32 reviews of this school


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Posted October 26, 2013

Continuing of lenart... Teachers each have their own personalities and teaching styles, with some being more effective teachers than others. The music department only has one "Do-it-all" guy. yes, he does a good job in placing in competitions but when it comes down to learning the fundamentals of music, he falls FLAT (lol). He manages many different bands and a choir, but he seems to favor some over the others. he isn't exactly the nicest person, but he does do A LOT for Lenart. The science teacher has been given the duty to teach boht science and social studies. she is a excellent science teacher, often teaching things above and beyond the textbook, but has to in a way, trim down her usual work to be able to cope with teaching 3 grade levels, two subjects. The math teacher...she's something. you learn to love her, if she doesn't like you, then you're kinda stuck. she teaches math well, but when I was in her class I sorta just learned something and then forgot it after the test. that's kinda why i'm re-taking algebra. She does help you, as long as you take the initiative to come speak to her, which is really smart, since that is what high school is revolved around, self-initiative.


Posted September 10, 2013

I was very optimistic about Lenart, but find that the teachers lack enthusiasm and the curriculum is uninspiring. I wish I saw the kids more excited about learning - as gifted students, there should be MANY MORE opportunities to showcase their talents outside the traditional classroom, as well as to gain leadership experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2013

Lenart Elementary is an Excellent school, if you want your child to be taught the fundamentals and NOT drilled just for test taking purposes Lenart is the place. The Principal, teachers, and parents are all about the students and ensuring they receive the best fundamental education. My daughters thirst for knowledge is being sated and challenged and I have learned some new things from her along the way. The school is very culturally diverse which is another plus in my opinion. Lenart can and will improve just like other schools with more funding. I have found the Principal to be very open to any and all suggestions regarding improving the school on all levels. This is a new year and my family is looking forward to the new journey this school year will bring.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2013

Is the new principal good for Lenart, that remains in the balance. The new principal last year (2012) created a power point presentation about Lenarts performance over the past 5 years or so. She stated our scores could be better. She said that the exiting principal and assistant principal did a good job, but the results could be higher. When a new principal with no experience in gifted teaching or leading a school of gifted students brings out a power point presentation with statistics, she will now be watched closely by many Lenart parents regarding performance. How can a someone who has not been at Lenart know how the school functions? The last time I checked, Lenart is in the Top 6 elementary schools in the state for more than 7 years and its only GOOD. So what is her goal? Since her start 2012, no Science Fairs, Speech Fairs, and other events to recognize Lenart students. She is changing things when they were working well. Lastly, she is not approachable in comparison to the last principal. Some parents have discussed that when they enter the main office, she makes eye contact from her desk, and does not acknowledge them. Oops, she is a principal. So far, no stats for 2013.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2013

My child has been at Lenart for a few years. I am optimistic about the new administration. Ms. Sims is young and very intelligent, however I wonder if she is experienced enough to be an effective instructional leader. Last year, the programming implemented for the additional hour of school was absolutely senseless! Basically the students did their homework or simply wasted away the time. I will be very interested in seeing the ISAT scores. As several parents indicated, Lenart needs to be more transparent. Overall, this school is easily above average. However, what remains unclear is whether this is simply because of the high performing students enrolled, or the result of exceptional instructional programming and delivery.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2013

We have been part of the Lenart community for the past couple years and we are loving that decision. We are kindly greeted and everyone knows my child by name (perks of a small school). We were fearful that attending this school was going deprive our child of a childhood, but it's a perfect balance (even with the commute & longer school day). My child enjoys this school and is challenged...he knows no other way. For those reviews complaining about the administration; that was the old. The new admin team started this year and has set even higher goals...continuing to make this school one of the best in the state of IL. Very pleased with where they want to take the school and how they continue to educate their teachers on how to differentiate instruction and make their practice even better. I too was concerned about the no recess, but now YES THEY HAVE RECESS! We have no doubt our child is receiving the best education! Before this we sent our child to a private school and the curriculum does even come close to that of Lenart's.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2012

My daughter has attended Lenart for 3 years & is an honor roll student; I am considering removing her. The school is wonderful academically in that the kids work at their level & are kept interested. My two greatest complaints are that the admin is horrible & the kids are spoiled. The atmosphere & administration of the past several years has not been very welcoming to parents. I hope with the change in principal there will be a shift in attitudes towards all parents. I hope that we are all welcome even if we are not the Parent Club president or Friend of Lenart Chair. As parents, we all should have pride in our kids and wish them nothing but the best, but there is a difference between setting our kids up with unrealistic expectations and preparing them for the future. I've heard several teachers and administrators tell our kids that they are "the best of the best," "future doctors, lawyers, judges," "the smartests kids around..." etc. What happens when that kid reaches their first obstacle? What happens when that kid actually wants to be a starving artist? What happens when that kid interacts with kids from other schools who are not up to their level?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2012

There is a very strong focus on academics and this school knows what it takes to motivate children to learn and accelerate. The teachers are outstanding. For the future, I hope there will be more time for recess and arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2011

My son is entering first grade and we absolutely love Lenart! We have found the teachers, principal, assistant principal, and counselor to be extremely accessible, engaged, and dedicated to the students. It is an academically intense program but we have felt that our son has been very supported by everyone at the school. He can't wait for school to begin again this year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2011

I have two children at Lenart. For the first time in their lives they are challenged and loving it. The children at Lenart are motivated and ambitious - they love to learn. Very few discipline problems, if any, as a result. We love the fact they are learning French and Latin. They work a solid two grade levels ahead, the pace is very accelerated. Don't apply if you child can't work at a very fast pace. Because of the fast paced environment parental involvement is really important and mandatory for your child to succeed. This does not mean that parents are doing all of the homework - what it means is that you have to be engaged with your child while they are doing homework and be available to answer questions about the instructions. The environment is nurturing, the front office staff is welcoming and lovely. The Principal is always around, and always talking to parents - she does not hide in her office like other schools that we have experienced. In fourth grade the children have departmentals so they move every period from one class to another. The Social Studies teacher is amazing - every teacher is excellent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2010

The Lenart administration is only interested in the test scores. They don't care about the child emotionally, physically or emotionally...just the test scores. The school is not welcoming for parents and lacks personality. I wish Lenart was more like Keller with afterschool programs etc. Strongly thinking of pulling my child out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2010

My son has just entered 1st grade at Lenart and one thing I am truly able to say is that your child will be as successful as you are in helping them. Some parents use school as daycare, and expect the schools to do all of the work. At Lenart, parents are expected to take part in their childs education. I don't see anything wrong with that. The key is communication. The teacher's have not let me down, nor my son. We are here to stay and proud to be a Lenart Lion!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2010

My son has been a student at Lenart since kindergarten. He is now in the third grade. I have to admit that I was a little uneasy about my child attending a school that had such a strict program, according to the principal. However, it has been the best thing for my son. He has done nothing but a have a fantastic time learning. Everyday he is challenged and he absolutey loves it. My husband and I participate on the Parent Club and LSC and love these activities as well. Wherever we can help, we try to do just that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

I took my child out of Lenart after 2 years. Unprofessionally run, non-gifted teachers teaching gifted children, no after school activities, no recess, 20 min lunches with no talking, too early start and too early release times, teachers that put fear into the children instead of nurturing, not up on technology (just check out their website - it shows they do not care and it's been the same look for years). The test scores are high because they take advantage of the the kids intelligence and give 4 hours worth of homework a night to make up for the short school day. As the parent, you are doing most of the teaching. If you have 4-6 hours a night to do homework with your child, can deal with the unprofessional administration and policies, good luck. Warning...Don't believe the hype!!! Scores are high but there is a price to pay.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2010

My son attended Lenart from K thru 8th grade. I honestly feel this is one of the best elementary schools in the state! Great Principal, great Teachers, great Student Body, and a great environment for learning. The kids are challenged to reach their fullest potential in the classroom and they are encouraged to be independent and creative thinkers as well. Plus, the kids standardized test scores are always among the best in the state. My son was in high demand when it was time to select a High School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2009

We have two children at Lenart and have been very pleased with the program. Yes, the curriculum is challenging but the teachers and administrators are more than accessible to help the children, and their parents, navigate the program. Despite the lack of funding from CPS, the Lenart team does a phenomenal job of bringing great resources to the school. The only drawback is the absence of recess. Weather permitting, the administrators allow the children staff-supervised outdoor playtime before classes begin. This, coupled with a twice-weekly gym class and many trips up-and-down the school stairs seem to get the kids through the day. Despite what others have said, we have found it very easy to get involved in activities to support the school. No, parents are not allowed to volunteer in the classroom but there are many ways to get involved and help the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2009

My daughter had to go back down to Kindergarten because of her date of birth. Contrary to reviews of other parents, I do not think that the school is organized very well. Students and parents aren't always given specific instructions on homework, projects, field trips, school events, etc. We're lucky if we get a note the day before an event to tell us about the event. Such was the case with the correction in time for the Parent Night for which we were obviously late. There are no afterschool programs so it is a huge inconvenience for working parents. This school constantly frustrates me. If it not were for some of the positive reviews and more aggressive curriculum, we would probably not be attending.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2009

So far so good. My daughter started in 1st grade this year. The administration is professional and super on top of things. They are so organized it puts other schools to shame. The teachers demand excellence and the curriculum is rigorous. They truly work two grade levels above - which is perfect if you have a child who is advanced and talented.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2008

My grandson has been at Lenart since kindergarten and he is now in the 6th grade. The staff and administration are always in pursuit of resources, techniques, and programs that not only geared toward academic success but socialization and personal growth of each student. I feel especially fortunate that my grandson attends Lenart and I know that this quality education will serve him long into the future.


Posted December 5, 2008

For educational pruposes solely, Lenart is a wonderfully competent institution. The work is challenging and the range of topics covered is a great foundation for high school and college curriculums. I feel as though my child, with this foundation, is well prepared to successfully attend any high school or college in the country. Also, the emphasis placed on english, math and reading studies is pronounced. It may lack in areas peripheral to academics, but on that criteria alone (academics), Lenart is TOPS!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female92%
Malen/a
Black94%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female88%
Malen/a
Black88%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female88%
Male100%
Black90%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students94%
Female88%
Male100%
Black90%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students97%
Female100%
Male92%
Black96%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students97%
Female100%
Male92%
Black96%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income100%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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State
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 60% 18%
White 20% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 4%
Hispanic 5% 24%
Two or more races 3% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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8101 South La Salle Street
Chicago, IL 60620
Phone: (773) 535-0040

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