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GreatSchools Rating

Learn Elementary Charter School

Charter | PK-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted December 19, 2013

I love the Excel campus. The teachers and principal are the best. I love the open lines of communication.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2013

Romano Butler use to be a great school but it is becoming worser and worser each year,the assistant principal bribes the kids, she is more worried about the performing arts in the school than the academics,more and more kids are transfering
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2013

I have three kids that attends school at Romano Butler. My Children have been attending this school for the past 4 years. over the years this school has changed a lot the staff are having a fashion show while the kids are getting out of control and grades are steady dropping, while the principal is always got her hands out talking about give me the money. It's time for my kids to go and get learn out of my pockets...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

My daughter attends the Hunter Perkins campus, I love this campus. When the children enter the building every morning the principal is there to greet them by shaking there hands and make sure they are starting there day on a good note. If for some reason they seem to be having some issues, she the pulls them to the side to see how she can help. Once it seems the situation has been turned around she dhakes there hand and send them on there way. So far so good, the school and staff have been very informative, and keeping us abreast of issues both inside and outside of school. I am very pleased with the interaction between my daughter's teacher with us, we are very pleased thus far and feel we made the right decision by coosing Learn Hunter Perkins for our childs source of eeducational learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2013

Don't send your children to LEARN. If you seek a quality education for your child, go elsewhere. This establishment is more like a 3 ring circus than an educational institution. The students are no longer disciplined for their actions; they spend numerous hours a day in a room governed by a pseudo-"warden" and NOT in a classroom learning. The majority of the teachers are great but will not remain and are desperate to leave. Nobody is happy at this "school." The administrators are a joke. If you request help, it generally takes days to receive action. They are simply too busy cleaning up the numerous messes than to aid their teachers in becoming better at their jobs. Students are bribed with various trinkets in addition to more valuable items in order to work hard on standardized tests. Their is also a huge racial divide at the school. Students have poor role models in the support staff whom are unable to provide a positive influence on these young minds. Instead, they choose to perpetuate the stereotype, thereby furthering as opposed to closing the achievement gap. Long story short: don't send your kids to LEARN Campbell. You'd be much better off ANYWHERE else!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 31, 2012

The quality of this school has really failed. They continue to change principal like every year. The new principal ms.johnson was great at learn when she was not in leadership meaning she showed she cared before she became a principal.Now all she cared about is parking her lexus across the street in front of the school showing her students her rims when alot of students need help to be on track with there reading and math. Then they charge for there summer school which only for 2 weeks what can a kid learn in 2 weeks and couldnt learn in a year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2012

My daughter has been attending LEARN Excel Charter School for three years now. The campus on Congress Pkwy. Academically its a good school, I love it! However, the staff is NOT on one accord! The leadership staff doesn't listen to the concerns of the parents and students. The concerns fall on deaf ears! The staff do work together!!!!!!!! The turnover rate is extremely high! A child needs stability! Teachers are leaving in the middle of the year, there's a new principle every year, its ridiculous! My child will be going to a different school next year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2011

My daughter has been at Learn for 3 years now. She did 2 years of PreK (she had a fabulous teaching team Ms. Bander and Mrs. Brown), they prepared her for 2nd grade and she was only going to Kindergarten. I love this school, I think it is one of the best schools on the Westside of Chicago and if you are in need of a school that will keep your child on target and help them to be successful and independent, your look is over. Learn Charter School (Romano Butler Campus) is the place you are looking for :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2011

We have been going to this school for 5 years. It's a great school to learn! My children are more advanced in math and reading compare with the other children their age. They have a long school day there and fewer holidays. Teachers are doing a very good job in educating students in Learn. The only one thing I wish for the school to become more diverse.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2011

My kids used to attended Learn. One went through 3rd grade and the other spent two years in pre k. The school started out wonderful. Although I believe the leadership (board) disagree with the principals and it causes confusion for everyone involved. While there we had three different principles, teachers left in the middle of the year, and I was tired of the constant transition. When the fourth principal started she didn't communicate with the parents and there was no explanation for why the incumbent left. I think this school has the potential to be one of the best schools in chicago because of the dedicated teachers and parents. I left the school once I realized that several of the teachers were leaving (some of the best). We have since gone to private school to catch my kids back up educationallly. They need an educated, experienced professional as a Principal with appropriate teaching certifications.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

I have been a substitute at Learn Romano Butler for going on one year now and have had nothing but positive experiences there. I enjoyed seeing that the pricipal cared as much about helping the high achieving students as she did about the lower level students. The Saturday prograam that was implemented was excellent and took learning to another level. L.E.A.R.N is a great place to take your child. Pre-k is not just play it is full out curriculum and they leave reading!!!!!


Posted November 23, 2009

I was a little hesitatnt about this school because of the location on Congress Parkway. However, this school has exceeded my expectations! The exceptional quality starts at the head and filters down. The principal has a through knowledge of each student and what their academic needs are. No child is left behind! The students learn each skill and are made to have a detailed knowledge of that skilll inside and out -not just on the surface level. When several students were not meeting expected goals the principal emplemented mandatory afterschool tutoring... I can not say enough about the quality and care out into each child. Words can not express my gratitude.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2009

I love how that teach students to go above their expectations
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2009

This is a great school. My son is in third grade now and has been attending this school since Pre-K. He can read and write well above level and has been reading since Pre-K. This school has an exceptional curriculum that pushes the children above and beyond.I would recommend this school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2009

This is a Great school I am so impressed. My daughter is in the 1st grade her teacher in Ms. Nakanishi she is the bomb I couldnt ask for a better teacher. She really cares about her students if my child is slacking any area I know that day, I dont have to wait until report card pick up to find out anything. Learn has a great support system the whole staff seems to love what they do. Learn encourage parent involement so everyone can have an inpact on the students. I wouldnt ask for a better school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2008

My son has attended PK at LEARN and is currently enrolled in Kindergarten. His reading and writing skills are amazing. We do Phonics and Math homework every night, and the Kindergarteners are included in the schools mobile laptop program. My son raves about playing games on the Laptop in class. Results from LEARN Charter are of private school quality.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2006

I really like the fact that they have a teachers aid in each class reducing the student/teacher ratio to about 11:1. Also they require each child to read 45min per night (5 days a week). In addition, they stress character development such as requiring kids to 'fix it' when they mistreat or offend someone. These things plus their skilled and very dedicated faculty makes Learn one of the top schools in Chicago. I highly recommend this school to anyone who wants a quality education for their child. The test scores speak for themselves
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2006

I think that learn is a wonderful school. The class sizes are great and staff are very involved with the children. Learn is one of the best schools in chicago.I myself traveled from Calumet City every day,to take my daughter to school there, and it was well worth it. They even have teacher aides with small class sizes so that every child can get the help that they need. T.Johnson
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 25, 2005

I think the school is excellent. small class sizes It's like a Prep school atmosphere.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students44%
Female45%
Male43%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income44%
Non-low income53%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female52%
Male39%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Non-low income58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students55%
Female64%
Male46%
Black55%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income54%
Non-low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)16%
Students without disabilities58%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students42%
Female49%
Male35%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income40%
Non-low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)11%
Students without disabilities45%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students78%
Female86%
Male70%
Black78%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income77%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)50%
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students49%
Female45%
Male54%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income49%
Non-low income55%
Students with disabilities (IEP)27%
Students without disabilities53%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students39%
Female38%
Male40%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Non-low income64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female72%
Male53%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female66%
Male43%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income54%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)7%
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female90%
Male83%
Black87%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income86%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female71%
Male65%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income67%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students91%
Female94%
Male87%
Black90%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income90%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female60%
Male60%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female65%
Male53%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 93% 18%
Two or more races 4% 3%
Hispanic 3% 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 52%N/A49%
Male 48%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Sekou Robertson

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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1132 South Homan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60624
Phone: (773) 826-6330

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