Share on Pinterest
There are no images.

GreatSchools profile data sources & information

 

GreatSchools Rating

The GreatSchools Rating is a tool to help parents compare schools based on standardized state test scores. It compares schools across the state, where the highest-rated schools in the state are designated “above average” and the lowest “below average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child’s and family’s needs as part of the school selection process.


Source: GreatSchools, 2016 | See more: More about GreatSchools Ratings

Test Scores

English & Math

The California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP)

In 2015-2016, California tested students using the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), administered through the online Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments. These are comprehensive, end-of-year assessments of grade-level learning that measure progress toward college and career readiness. Each test, English language arts/literacy (ELA) and mathematics is comprised of two parts: (1) a computer-adaptive test; and (2) a performance task; administered within a 12-week window beginning at 66 percent of the instructional year for grades 3 through 8 or within in a seven-week window beginning at 80 percent of the instructional year for grade 11. The summative assessments are aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for ELA and mathematics. The tests capitalize on the strengths of computer-adaptive testing — efficient and precise measurement across the full range of achievement and timely turnaround of results.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2016 | See more: 13 key skills teens need to be college and career-ready

Science

The California Standards Tests (CSTs)

In 2015-2016, California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in science in grades 5, 8, and 10. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2016 | See more: More about science in high school

College readiness

College readiness rating

The college readiness rating reflects high school graduation rates, SAT or ACT participation and performance, and AP exam participation and performance for this school compared to the state average.


Source: GreatSchools, 2015 | See more: More about GreatSchools Ratings

Graduation rate

Graduation rates for counties, districts, and schools across California were calculated based on four-year cohort information using the state’s California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS). Cohort means that the same groups of students were followed for four years in this data collection.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Helping students stay on the road to college; This page from the CA Dept. of Education website explains what the course requirements are to graduate from a California public school.

UC/CSU Eligibility

To be eligible for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) schools, high school students must complete required A-G courses. This data point represents the percent of 12th grade graduates who completed all of the A-G courses with a grade of C or better. This data includes summer graduates and does not include students with high school equivalencies, such as the General Educational Development (GED) test or California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE).


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Understanding the A-G requirements; This page from the CA Dept. of Education website offers more information about UC and CSU student requirements.

SAT participation rate

The SAT participation rate is based on the number of 12th grade students who took the test out of the total number of students enrolled in grade 12 at this school, as reported by the CA Dept. of Education.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Strategies to help your child prepare for college entrance tests

SAT scores

This reflects the average SAT score (out of 2400 total possible points) for all students at this school who took the SAT in 2015.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Our profiles currently reflect 2015 SAT information. The SAT test changed in March 2016. Check back soon to see updated SAT test scores for your school. In the meantime, learn more about the new SAT.

AP exam pass rate

Advanced Placement (AP) classes are rigorous classes with a national final exam. The AP exam pass rate reflects the percentage of students who passed the end-of-course AP exam.


Source: Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), 2014

AP course participation

Advanced Placement (AP) classes are rigorous classes with a national final exam. This data point represents the percentage of students in grades 10-12 at this school who enrolled in an AP class in 2014.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: All about Advanced Placement courses and exams

ACT participation rate

The ACT participation rate is calculated by using the number of test takers over the number of students enrolled in grade 12, as reported by the CA Dept. of Education.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: ACT vs. SAT: what’s the difference?

ACT scores

The ACT test is designed to assess high school students’ general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The ACT test covers four subject areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. Each subject area test receives a score ranging from 1 to 36. The composite score is the average of all four subject area test scores.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015

Students

% enrollment by Race

The state-collected student ethnicity and race information is gathered in accordance with federal guidelines based on the student’s primary enrollment information, using the following definitions:

  • Hispanic/Latino: A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) who maintains a tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African-American: A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: This page from the CA Dept. of Education website includes definitions for student race/ethnicity.

% enrollment of students from low-income families

The students from low-income families designation is based on the percent of students at this school who are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: California Department of Education information on student poverty.

% enrollment of English language learners

The percent of students at this school who are classified as English language learners.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: This page of the CA Dept. of Education website offers more information about ELL student classifications.

% enrollment by gender

The population of students at this school by gender.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Does your high school have a gender gap?; Inside the high school brain.

Teachers & staff

Teachers per student

This ratio reflects the total number of students enrolled compared to the total number of full-time equivalent teachers at the school. Please note that this ratio is not a reflection of average class size.


Source: Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), 2013-2014 (part of the U.S. Department of Education). Since 1968 the US Department of Education has collected data about key education and civil rights issues in our nation’s public schools. The data is collected every other year  in a survey of public schools to gather information on leading civil rights indicators related to access and barriers to educational opportunity at the early childhood through grade 12 levels. | See more: How important is class size?

Students per counselor

This ratio reflects the total number of students enrolled compared to the total number of counselors at the school.


Source: Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), 2013-2014 | See more: Helping your child be the first to go to college.

Teachers with < 3 years teaching experience 

This is the percentage of full-time equivalent teachers who are either in their first or second year of teaching.


Source: Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), 2013-2014 | See more: What does teacher tenure mean for parents?

% teachers who are certified  

This is the percentage of full-time equivalent teachers who are certified, meaning that they have met all applicable state teacher certification requirements for a standard certificate. A certified teacher has a regular/standard certificate/license/endorsement issued by the state. A beginning teacher who has met the standard teacher education requirements is considered to have met state requirements even if he or she has not completed a state-required probationary period. A teacher working towards certification by way of alternative routes, or a teacher with an emergency, temporary, or provisional credential is not considered to have met state requirements. (Source: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/crdc-2015-16-all-schools-form.pdf)


Source: Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), 2013-2014 | See more: What makes a great teacher?

Average teacher salary 

This reflects the salary expenditures for teachers funded with state and local funds over the total number of full-time teachers at the school. 


Source: Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), 2013-2014 | See more: It’s all about the teacher

Equity – Race/ethnicity

English & Math

The California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP)

In 2015-2016, California tested students using the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), administered through the online Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments. These are comprehensive, end-of-year assessments of grade-level learning that measure progress toward college and career readiness. Each test, English language arts/literacy (ELA) and mathematics is comprised of two parts: (1) a computer-adaptive test; and (2) a performance task; administered within a 12-week window beginning at 66 percent of the instructional year for grades 3 through 8, or within in a seven-week window beginning at 80 percent of the instructional year for grade 11. The summative assessments are aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for ELA and mathematics. The tests capitalize on the strengths of computer-adaptive testing — efficient and precise measurement across the full range of achievement and timely turnaround of results. This section of the profile breaks out student test score results by race/ethnicity.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2016 | See more: 13 key skills teens need to be college and career-ready

Science

The California Standards Tests (CSTs)

In 2015-2016, California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in science in grades 5, 8, and 10. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests. This section of the profile breaks out student test score results by race/ethnicity.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2016 | See more: More about science in high school

Graduation rates

Graduation rates for counties, districts, and schools across California are calculated based on four-year cohort information using the state’s California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS). Cohort means that the same groups of students were followed for four years in this data collection. This section of the profile breaks out student graduation rates by race/ethnicity.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Helping students stay on the road to college; This page from the CA Dept. of Education website explains the course requirements to graduate from a California public high school.

UC/CSU eligibility

To be eligible for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) schools, high school students must complete required A-G courses. This data point represents the percent of 12th grade graduates who completed all the A-G courses with a grade of C or better. This data includes summer graduates and does not include students with high school equivalencies, such as the General Educational Development (GED) test or California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE). This section of the profile breaks out student A-G course completion rates by race/ethnicity.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Understanding the A-G requirements. ; This page from the CA Dept. of Education website offers more information about UC and CSU student requirements.

Equity – Low-income students

Low-income rating

This rating reflects English, math, and science test scores for students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch compared to all students in the state.


Source: GreatSchools, 2016

English & Math

The California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP)

In 2015-2016, California tested students using the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), administered through the online Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments. These are comprehensive, end-of-year assessments of grade-level learning that measure progress toward college and career readiness. Each test, English language arts/literacy (ELA) and mathematics is comprised of two parts: (1) a computer-adaptive test; and (2) a performance task; administered within a 12-week window beginning at 66 percent of the instructional year for grades 3 through 8, or within in a seven-week window beginning at 80 percent of the instructional year for grade 11. The summative assessments are aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for ELA and mathematics. The tests capitalize on the strengths of computer-adaptive testing — efficient and precise measurement across the full range of achievement and timely turnaround of results. This section of the profile breaks out student test scores by family income level.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2016 | See more: 13 key skills teens need to be college and career-ready

Science

The California Standards Tests (CSTs)

In 2015-2016, California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in science in grades 5, 8, and 10. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests. This section of the profile breaks out student test score results by family income level.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2016 | See more: More about science in high school

Graduation rates

Graduation rates for counties, districts, and schools across California are calculated based on four-year cohort information using the state’s California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS). Cohort means that the same groups of students were followed for four years in this data collection. This section of the profile breaks out student graduation rates by family income level.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Helping students stay on the road to college; This page from the CA Dept. of Education website explains what the course requirements are to graduate from a California public school.

UC/CSU eligibility

To be eligible for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) schools, high school students must complete required A-G courses. This data point represents the percent of 12th grade graduates who completed all the A-G courses with a grade of C or better. This data includes summer graduates and does not include students with high school equivalencies, such as the General Educational Development (GED) test or California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE). This section of the profile breaks out student A-G course completion rates by family income level.


Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2015 | See more: Understanding the A-G requirements; This page from the CA Dept. of Education website offers more information about UC and CSU student requirements.